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Specialized Rockhopper '91 build

Old 08-27-22, 01:21 PM
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@Positron400

Looks good from here, great job.

One small niggle, I would encourage you to deflate and move the valve stems around to get them straight and unstressed, if they squirm around enough as they sometimes do, you may end up with a flat that cannot be patched on the trail. Also a good reason to carry a spare tube as well as a patch kit.
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Old 08-27-22, 01:29 PM
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Originally Posted by merziac
@Positron400

Looks good from here, great job.

One small niggle, I would encourage you to deflate and move the valve stems around to get them straight and unstressed, if they squirm around enough as they sometimes do, you may end up with a flat that cannot be patched on the trail. Also a good reason to carry a spare tube as well as a patch kit.
Thanks! I really like the look of it - I always carry a spare tube and a patch kit on every ride, so i got that sorted.
Will do regarding the valve stems. I recall trying that, when i put the tyres on, but they seemed to "get crooked" again. might have to give it a more "robust" try.
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Old 08-27-22, 01:38 PM
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Originally Posted by Positron400
Thanks! I really like the look of it - I always carry a spare tube and a patch kit on every ride, so i got that sorted.
Will do regarding the valve stems. I recall trying that, when i put the tyres on, but they seemed to "get crooked" again. might have to give it a more "robust" try.
You're welcome.

Yeah, its another one of those little PITA things that seems like it should take care of itself in an intensive process that wrangles so many other PITA's and yet, no.

I almost always inflate and deflate newly mounted tires and or tubes 3x to "walk" the tube around inside the tire and get them straight, eliminate wrinkles, etc.
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Old 08-27-22, 02:15 PM
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Glad you got the Rockhopper out on the trails. Since you mentioned traction issues, you might wanna try some wide knobby tires if you're primarily riding this off road. My '93 Sport has 2.2" wide tires on it with room for 2.4"s.
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Old 08-27-22, 02:35 PM
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Originally Posted by Clang
Glad you got the Rockhopper out on the trails. Since you mentioned traction issues, you might wanna try some wide knobby tires if you're primarily riding this off road. My '93 Sport has 2.2" wide tires on it with room for 2.4"s.
Yea, not sure if i will be sticking to trails, if my first experience is anything to go by - always thought trails were supposed to be more dirt and less rocks. I will try a different one, which, judging from the video i watched, should be a lot less rocky and more "earthy/flowy".
I really dont like the look of knobby tyres - might try'n find a panaracer with less aggressive treads. 2.1'' is as wide as I am willing to go, due to looks It's already an adjustment, coming from 700Cx28/30ties on my retro rebuild road bike
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Old 08-28-22, 11:51 AM
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Originally Posted by Positron400
Yea, not sure if i will be sticking to trails, if my first experience is anything to go by - always thought trails were supposed to be more dirt and less rocks. I will try a different one, which, judging from the video i watched, should be a lot less rocky and more "earthy/flowy".
I really dont like the look of knobby tyres - might try'n find a panaracer with less aggressive treads. 2.1'' is as wide as I am willing to go, due to looks It's already an adjustment, coming from 700Cx28/30ties on my retro rebuild road bike
Your DTHs are good for pavement and light gravel, not so much for roots and rocks, as you've discovered. You don't have to go full knobbies, but small knobbies would be a big help for trails. Ride your bike everywhere, get to know each other, then try that trail again.

Seth of Berm Peak made a short series of beginner mtb. videos BITD. You can find some useful tips in there. HTH.

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Old 08-29-22, 06:03 AM
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Originally Posted by Korina
Your DTHs are good for pavement and light gravel, not so much for roots and rocks, as you've discovered. You don't have to go full knobbies, but small knobbies would be a big help for trails. Ride your bike everywhere, get to know each other, then try that trail again.

Seth of Berm Peak made a short series of beginner mtb. videos BITD. You can find some useful tips in there. HTH.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=arwx...tmCveT&index=1
thanks for the tips! I ordered some Panaracer Dirt/Smoke tyres (tanwall) and I will give it a go again. Had a trial run on a different more "flowy" trail the other day, and that worked a lot better in comparison.
Seth defo helps, since i wanna get into wheelies/bunnyhops/manuals eventually.
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Old 08-29-22, 08:56 AM
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Your build looks great! I've got a pink stumpy from the same era and you're giving me some ideas. Have fun!
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Old 08-29-22, 09:03 AM
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Originally Posted by TXtea
Your build looks great! I've got a pink stumpy from the same era and you're giving me some ideas. Have fun!
Thanks! Do let me know what you get up to with your bike and send some pics
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Old 08-29-22, 09:30 AM
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Originally Posted by Soody
very nice project.

for next time, try this Sheldon Brown trick:
Get a bolt/nut and some washers. Do it up on the fixed cup and keep turning it.
You can apply a lot of force this way, with a long pipe over the wrench (I use a tow-bar bike rack).

I’ve never been able to make the Sheldon Brown method work. I also seen cups damaged by using that method. I’ve developed a different method…and a different approach…to loose bearing bottom bracket removal.:

My homemade tool is for removing the fixed cup on the bottom bracket.

I’ve come to the conclusion that we have been taught to remove fixed cups wrong for a long time. I, like most everyone, have been taught to remove the adjustable cup first, followed by the fixed cup. We avoid removing the fixed cup because it can be difficult to remove. I realized that I needed to stand the procedure on its head. Remove the fixed cup first since it is the hardest one and the wrench needs the most stabilization. The spindle can be used to hold the tool but it will allow the wrench to turn with the cup so that the tool doesn’t even need to be removed to completely remove the fixed cup.

Since there are 2 types of spindle, the procedure and fastener used will depend on which spindle is present. The nut or bolt used on the spindle can be used to hold everything in place.

Tool Assembly
The parts for the nutted spindle needed are shown here. Most everything can be found in just about any shop. The large fender washer is probably the only thing you’ll have to go to a hardware store for.

A large fender washer, an adjustable cup, and the spindle nut are needed. Another washer may be needed to get the spacing right. The order of assembly follows







From above it should look like this

Turn the wrench as usual. If more leverage is needed, a cheater bar is needed.

For bolted spindles, the order of assembly is the same except a bolt is needed.



This method is much easier to use than other methods I’ve used. The spindle stabilizes the wrench and turns with it much like a cartridge bearing does. It makes it easier to remove the fixed cup and results in less blood spilled.
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Old 08-29-22, 01:43 PM
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Originally Posted by Positron400
thanks for the tips! I ordered some Panaracer Dirt/Smoke tyres (tanwall) and I will give it a go again. Had a trial run on a different more "flowy" trail the other day, and that worked a lot better in comparison.
Seth defo helps, since i wanna get into wheelies/bunnyhops/manuals eventually.
Good! I should warn you, he got four videos in and then moved to S. Carolina. The Fluride Mountain Bike Instruction YT channel might be useful.
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Old 09-01-22, 06:00 PM
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Originally Posted by cyccommute
I’ve never been able to make the Sheldon Brown method work. I also seen cups damaged by using that method. I’ve developed a different method…
I like that. Makes sense and I will compile your tool in future. Re the Sheldon method though, and damaging the cups, of the last dozen loose bearing bbs i've removed recently, all had badly pitted surfaces. I view it as a near inevitability to replace with a cartridge unit. Even if the damage question is wrong vs feels wrong. The exceptions for keeping an original bb would maybe be esoteric vintage bikes (even then), low mileage classics, or very low end things on a strict budget.
As a side note, have you got an opinion on the Sheldon (bottom brackets should almost all be set with some play, except campagnolo, to be adequately smooth), vs Jobst Brandt (bottom brackets should be set slightly binding with some preload to have the bearings work properly)? Because i've never been that satisfied with the smoothness of an overhauled even nicer loose bottom bracket, compared to a good cartridge unit. As UN55s become harder and harder to buy cheaply i may re-consider my adversion to loose bbs. The new Tourney shimano cartridge units are often notchy out of the box and seem pretty crap and IRD or Tange are a big step up in price shipped here.
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Old 09-01-22, 06:07 PM
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Originally Posted by Positron400
As promised, here a are a few pics from my first trail outing with the Rockhopper. I have never ridden a trail before and am a complete novice when it comes to MTBking. I found a local trail nearby which was advertised with the difficulty "green". Seemed fairly innocent enough, so out I went. While the first few meters were fairly tame, I quickly came across rather steep sections with rocks popping out where there was no traction to be had. Almost went over the bars several times. The parts where there was mostly dirt track, were quite enjoable, but the steep rocky, twist ones with trees in between, were definitely not .
Now I know why "proper" MTBs use hydraulic brakes and whatnot. Also, the seatpost turned out to be a massive issue when going downhill. Since there is no dropper post installed, I couldnt shift my weight back enough to safely go downhill. Will definitely look for one of them saddle-grip-actuated dropper posts for the next one (feel free to reccomend one for a 27.2 seatpost). Furthermore, I don't even wanna imagine what a "black" difficulty trail must have in store, when such "tame" (which to me it ABSOLUTELY was not) trails are that nerve wrecking.

Moral of the story: Offroad is fun, steep rocky sections without hydraulic brakes are not. run-of-the-mill flat pedals are awesome if you wanna properly ding your shin bones. Not giving up on MTB yet, but will try'n find more flowy (that's a word i learned from the MTB lads) and waaaaaay less technical trails in the "easier than green" difficulty. - And install a dropper post.

Peace and see you on the trail/road

Some pics below:


Rockhopper in it's natural habitat. Propped up by a stick, close to a tree, looking cool

Same tree - different angle

More different angles

Innocently looking "trailhead" :E

Same trailhead - different angle. No pics from the actual trail riding, because I was busy trying not to go OTB and die
Very cool build. Underbiking is fun. Those mtb trails might be boring on a more competent bike.

I think you're being severely limited for trail riding with those pedals. Modern pinned platforms are far more secure and add a lot of confidence.
And if you want better braking, some Kool Stop eagle IIs would also be a major upgrade over those cheap generics. The salmon ones.
Your fit is also probably a major problem for control on trails. There's just too much bar drop, especially with drop bars which add more in the position with the most control. That's a larger issue than not having a dropper. Sussing fit is a lifelong endeavor though.

It looks really fun as is
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