Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Classic & Vintage
Reload this Page >

1984 Centurion Pro Tour 15

Notices
Classic & Vintage This forum is to discuss the many aspects of classic and vintage bicycles, including musclebikes, lightweights, middleweights, hi-wheelers, bone-shakers, safety bikes and much more.

1984 Centurion Pro Tour 15

Old 09-07-22, 11:14 AM
  #26  
Senior Member
 
StarBiker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 2,029

Bikes: Bianchi Grizzly, Cannondale F700,

Liked 155 Times in 124 Posts
Chrome bikes are tough finds...

The only one I ever found last year. If it was a mountain bike instead of a road bike I would have kept it. It was my size but as usual bothered my neck like most vintage roadies. Paid $35 with a rewards card, and a coupon. Dig spot wanted $100. I ultimately had $100 in it. $20 to replace that bizarre seat post which I gave the eventual buyer annoyed me. Sold $380.....

StarBiker is offline  
Old 09-07-22, 02:11 PM
  #27  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Madison, WI USA
Posts: 6,163
Liked 1,763 Times in 1,198 Posts
Dang, I was kinda liking the beausage/patina look of the semi-stripped finish. In any event, especially down there, I would leave it chrome.

"Symmetric", BTW, refers to how those shifters operate. As you move the right shifter toward smaller cogs, a little humunculus inside the housing shuffles over and pulls the front shifter a little, to move the front cage to the right to keep the chain from rubbing. All the more reason to just shoot some lube from the outside.

The Golden Boy , the 40-spoke rear is not a big surprise for a canti-equipped bike of that era; the '87 Nishiki Cresta I picked up a couple months ago is so equipped. The sealed bearings are, however, an especially tasty treat.
madpogue is offline  
Old 09-07-22, 02:25 PM
  #28  
Full Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Sep 2019
Location: Tulsa, OK
Posts: 214

Bikes: 2005 Orbea Spirit + 2018 Specialized Diverge + 1974 Raleigh Competition + 1983 Centurion Pro Tour 15

Liked 236 Times in 98 Posts
[QUOTE=madpogue;22639545]Dang, I was kinda liking the beausage/patina look of the semi-stripped finish. In any event, especially down there, I would leave it chrome.

"Symmetric", BTW, refers to how those shifters operate. As you move the right shifter toward smaller cogs, a little humunculus inside the housing shuffles over and pulls the front shifter a little, to move the front cage to the right to keep the chain from rubbing. All the more reason to just shoot some lube from the outside.

I'm usually a fan of patina, too, but the asymmetric semi-stipped finish was going to really gnaw at my slightly OCD brain.

But, wow, I'm glad to learn about the shifters. I hadn't looked into them before. Nifty, if not exactly necessary, and very Japanese.
dbhouston is offline  
Old 09-07-22, 03:58 PM
  #29  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Posts: 2,061
Liked 1,096 Times in 530 Posts
Originally Posted by madpogue
The Golden Boy , the 40-spoke rear is not a big surprise for a canti-equipped bike of that era; the '87 Nishiki Cresta I picked up a couple months ago is so equipped. The sealed bearings are, however, an especially tasty treat.
Yeah I believe most if not all of the big brand tourers came with 36/40 in the mid 80s, no? My 86 Voyageur also did.

As for the sealed bearings, doesnít this actually just mean there is a rubber seal to help from dirt getting in? Not that they are actually sealed cup?
polymorphself is offline  
Old 09-07-22, 04:04 PM
  #30  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Madison, WI USA
Posts: 6,163
Liked 1,763 Times in 1,198 Posts
^^^^^ A *LOT* of '80s and '90s vintage Japanese hubs I've re-greased have had the "SEALED MECHANISM" decal on the hub body, which indeed really only means there's a rubber seal over conventional cup/cone bearings.

Just noticed, also, that this bike is a 5-speed in the rear, from a time when 6-speed was well into the mainstream, especially for mid-level and higher bikes. My Nishiki was likewise equipped (per spec). I reckon the idea was that a wheel built around 5-speed would have less dish. I'm curious whether the rear triangle is spaced at 120 or 126mm (My Nishiki is 120).

Last edited by madpogue; 09-07-22 at 04:13 PM.
madpogue is offline  
Old 09-07-22, 09:10 PM
  #31  
Car free since 2018
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Location: Vancouver, BC
Posts: 691

Bikes: Mostly japanese ones

Liked 270 Times in 135 Posts
The hubs on my 83 Pro tour are cartridge bearing, like the ones that were on my Nishiki Internationals (84,85) and Sequoia (85). I'd guess the ones on the 84 are also cartridge bearings.
rgvg is offline  
Old 09-08-22, 12:44 AM
  #32  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Madison, WI USA
Posts: 6,163
Liked 1,763 Times in 1,198 Posts
Originally Posted by rgvg
The hubs on my 83 Pro tour are cartridge bearing, like the ones that were on my Nishiki Internationals (84,85) .....
Interesting, Nishiki reverted to conventional bearings by '89. Wonder why cartridge hub bearings didn't catch on more BITD.
madpogue is offline  
Old 09-10-22, 06:45 PM
  #33  
Full Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Sep 2019
Location: Tulsa, OK
Posts: 214

Bikes: 2005 Orbea Spirit + 2018 Specialized Diverge + 1974 Raleigh Competition + 1983 Centurion Pro Tour 15

Liked 236 Times in 98 Posts
Progress



I can definitively say these are cartridge bearings. The rear wheel was running rough, so I got in there to service them today. Thankfully, MiamiJim shared a great illustrated tutorial on BF.

Building back to stock, more or less, is getting close, with a few changes:
  • The battle scarred seatpost is in the parts bin, now. I had an old 27mm carbon one to slip in.
  • I replaced the Sakae road bars with a Sakae Randnner I had here. Looks a little cooler and a little wider.
  • Replaced the Gran-Compe levers with another DiaCompe set I had, mostly to avoid removing the existing hoods.
  • I had a fresher feeling chain on a hook, which turned out to have the same number of links as the original, so I swapped that on.
  • And that's a nice leather Vetta Transverse saddle on there for now.
The bike has been relatively easy. I needed to re-tap a couple of bottle cage mounts, and service the cartridge bearings, but everything else has been pretty typical. A part is dirty, greasy, rusty, whatever; you make it clean and lubricated, then put it back on! I spent a long time on the front wheel, just using an old fork in the vise for the truing stand. I'll do the rear once I get the brakes set up to use as a guide.

All that's left is cabling. Maybe later tonight. It is so satisfying to go from unrideable and ugly to something downright neat. Looking forward to a good test ride soon. Maybe I'll throw on a rack and test it in a brewery run!

Late night addendum: Cabling hasn't gone so well!
  • The rear derailleur hanger was bent inwards, so the cage hit the spokes. I don't own the proper tool, so settled for wrenching it back to what looks like straight. Probably a good excuse to add a useful tool this week.
  • The Suntour Symmetric shifters are causing lots of pain. Without disassembling them, I simply put them back on and proceeded to set things up like normal. But, no! These are apparently not normal at all. I'll retry soon enough with printed BF discussions of how to do it. I didn't understand I needed to do the rear, then put that in the biggest cog before doing the front. Also, neither lever seems to have the tension to hold a gear, and the left lever is downright wobbly. Glad there are plenty of discussions on here about them.
  • I didn't even try cabling the brakes, yet. But Kansas and Tulsa both won football games tonight, so that kept me distracted from my mechanical failings!
Finally, there is an old REI bike on the market locally that has a full set of Shimano RSX 3x7. Cheap. Seems like that group might be a good alternative build for this bike?

Last edited by dbhouston; 09-10-22 at 10:22 PM.
dbhouston is offline  
Likes For dbhouston:
Old 09-10-22, 10:00 PM
  #34  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Baton Rouge La
Posts: 1,217
Liked 347 Times in 231 Posts
That turned out great. Were the hubs the Suntour's that take the special wrench? (.Suntour TA260 Hub Tool)
Hobbiano is offline  
Old 09-10-22, 10:18 PM
  #35  
Full Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Sep 2019
Location: Tulsa, OK
Posts: 214

Bikes: 2005 Orbea Spirit + 2018 Specialized Diverge + 1974 Raleigh Competition + 1983 Centurion Pro Tour 15

Liked 236 Times in 98 Posts
Originally Posted by Hobbiano
That turned out great. Were the hubs the Suntour's that take the special wrench? (.Suntour TA260 Hub Tool)
I think in an ideal world, I'd have had that tool. But it was pretty intuitive to simply leave that side intact and make adjustments on the other end of the axle. I worked on the rear, which has the special fitting only on the non-drive side, so just lucky, perhaps. The front feels fine, though it's messing with my brain to buy an old bike and NOT play with the wheel bearings.
dbhouston is offline  
Likes For dbhouston:
Old 09-13-22, 11:48 AM
  #36  
meandering nomad
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Newport,Rhode Island
Posts: 446

Bikes: eleven bikes no car

Liked 16 Times in 12 Posts
About the the shifters, the little bit of "play" is normal. It worried me when I did mine and once I read up on them it was ok. I am used to having to trim the front DR for rub with the triple and half step rings on a different bike.

Last edited by billew; 09-13-22 at 11:50 AM. Reason: clarify comment
billew is offline  
Likes For billew:
Old 09-14-22, 09:42 AM
  #37  
Full Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Sep 2019
Location: Tulsa, OK
Posts: 214

Bikes: 2005 Orbea Spirit + 2018 Specialized Diverge + 1974 Raleigh Competition + 1983 Centurion Pro Tour 15

Liked 236 Times in 98 Posts
Finished building the stock-ish version last night, except I'm getting very futzy shifting from the Suntour Asymmetric shifters. I'm going to print out and follow to a tee the set up instructions I found in another post. Grrr. I also need to replace the headset and replace the sealed bearings in the rear wheel. But it would be a rider with a few fixes and easily sellable when I'm in the mood.



Took a quick spin in the dark and believe it'll be a fine bike and close enough fit for it to be a keeper, at least for a while. Which has me thinking about a re-build ... that's what happens. Anyway, the changes I'd want to make would include a somewhat more modern drivetrain, wider handlebars, probably fenders and a rear rack. Again, more a citified tourer. Poking around FB Marketplace for potential donor bikes, I stumbled on this (early-1990s?) oddity:


Villiger Gottardo Comfort - https://www.facebook.com/marketplace...6183783036571/

Honestly, I'm almost curious enough to want to own that thing just for the novelty, but I don't have room to accumulate curiousities and can't help but see a whole lot of Pro Tour donor material on there:
  • Trekking bars with 3x7 flat mount shifters and levers
  • Shimano Nexave drivetrain - seems to have been pretty short lived
  • 700c wheels including hub dynamo and lights
  • 700c mudguards
I'd be left with the sad sight of that very unusual frame and its suspension hanging from the rafters, but the Pro Tour would acquire some pretty interesting improvements. Other potential donor bikes would be mostly for the drivetrain, but it would be hard to find more parts for less money if the Nexave is suitable for transplantation. Would love to hear any thoughts on this or other potential plans.
dbhouston is offline  
Old 09-14-22, 03:41 PM
  #38  
Senior Member
 
DiegoFrogs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Scranton, PA, USA
Posts: 2,570

Bikes: '77 Centurion "Pro Tour"; '67 Carlton "The Flyer"; 1984 Ross MTB (stored at parents' house)

Liked 93 Times in 61 Posts
The dynamo might be okay, but I wouldn't bother with the lights on that thing. Even cheaper modern dynamo headlights will be far superior. Maybe the rear is LED, but I'm not sure.

I'm not sure I'd "upgrade" to 7-speed. Probably has a freewheel. There's nothing wrong with that, if that's what you have, but the only time I've done this I went directly to 8-speed. Budget minded parts can be had easily and the freehub is an improvement.
DiegoFrogs is offline  
Old 09-14-22, 06:46 PM
  #39  
Senior Member
 
icemilkcoffee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 2,559
Liked 1,890 Times in 1,051 Posts
As powerful as modern rechargeable lithium batteries and LED lights are, I don't see the point of dynamo hubs any more.
icemilkcoffee is offline  
Old 09-20-22, 11:07 PM
  #40  
Full Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Sep 2019
Location: Tulsa, OK
Posts: 214

Bikes: 2005 Orbea Spirit + 2018 Specialized Diverge + 1974 Raleigh Competition + 1983 Centurion Pro Tour 15

Liked 236 Times in 98 Posts
Just a quick progress report ... on just a little progress.


Y'all talked me out of using the crazy Villiger as a donor bike. Plus, it would have felt like killing off the last of an endangered species. I won't be surprised if that bike ends up in my garage soon, just for the novelty ...

But, some quick changes:
  • Brakes: I had these modern Tektro brake levers and decided to throw them on. Aero routing is so much nicer, and my greatest irritation in vintage bike life is when the cable end slips out of its slot inside the levers. If there's a good tip for keeping that from happening, please share it for future reference. Also ordered Kool Stop pads, but they are a hair too long for the front. I'll have to find something shorter for that.
  • Shifters: Man, I wanted to like the oh-so-clever asymmetric Suntour Symmetric shifters and their elegant top mount, but I just couldn't get them to work as designed. But I found a reasonable pair of Suntour bar end shifters on EBay and figure that'll be an improvement. Looking around, it seems like there's a clear divide as to cable routing for them: following the bars to the top or shooting out from the drops. Again, any advice would be welcome before I waste another set of bar tape. I had a Suntour downtube double cable stop clamp thing, so that's going on there in lieu of the elaborare workarounds described elsewhere on BF.
  • Freehweel: The RD on the bike is a Suntour Cyclone Mark II, and it seems they should work fine with a 5, 6, or 7 speed freewheel. I have a Shimano 6 speed 13-28 and plan on trying it out after I install the shifters. Seems like it should work fine, but we'll see.
  • I also found a good deal on a Vetta leather saddle that I think shoud be the rough equivalent of the original. No harm in a spare old saddle at the right price, so if it doesn't work here, no harm.
  • That Ibera rack is on loosely as a test, but I like it.
  • In a bit of a splurge, I've ordered a full set of original decals in "Brick Red" from Velocals, plus the Tange #2 ones and a very retro Japan decal. Should look pretty cool.
I'll toss in a plug for St. Louis Bicycle Works, particularly their EBay store. This week, I ordered the saddle and barcons from them as well as a Campag cassette I needed for another bike. They use auctions, but seem to attract very little attention to interesting stuff, so give them a look: https://www.ebay.com/str/stlbicycleworks.

And finally, I get a kick out of this advertisement for the 1984 Pro Tour. It's a preview of the wilder graphics Centurion soon adopted:

Last edited by dbhouston; 09-20-22 at 11:12 PM.
dbhouston is offline  
Old 09-20-22, 11:22 PM
  #41  
Full Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Sep 2019
Location: Tulsa, OK
Posts: 214

Bikes: 2005 Orbea Spirit + 2018 Specialized Diverge + 1974 Raleigh Competition + 1983 Centurion Pro Tour 15

Liked 236 Times in 98 Posts
Apropos of nothing above, the gradual realization that I'm going to end-up as a four bike household (road, gravel, this one, and the next project) made me rethink my shop layout. So I've moved things around, sent old frames and wheels into the rafters, and installed two easily accessible hangers to a post. So I thought I'd share a picture of my happy place, where I fiddle with old bikes while listening to music or watching sports and sometimes even drinking beer. I expect many of you have a similar space ...

dbhouston is offline  
Old 09-20-22, 11:54 PM
  #42  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Madison, WI USA
Posts: 6,163
Liked 1,763 Times in 1,198 Posts
Originally Posted by dbhouston
Also ordered Kool Stop pads, but they are a hair too long for the front. I'll have to find something shorter for that.
I just installed a set of those Kool-Stop canti pads on my '89 Nishiki Cresta, and yes, the very back tips hit the insides of the fork blades when I release the brake, keeping the arms from opening all the way. They still work fine, and provide plenty of room for a 27 x 1-1/4 tire to clear when I remove the wheel.
Looking around, it seems like there's a clear divide as to cable routing for them: following the bars to the top or shooting out from the drops. Again, any advice would be welcome before I waste another set of bar tape.
Before you waste any bar tape, ride it without tape for a while, just electrical-tape the cable housings to the bar. Good to do that anyway, and get a sense of the right brake lever position, before the full taping. This will also give you a chance to try routing the shifter cables both possible ways, just get a sense of how each affects the shifting feel, and what the housings do when you steer, and how your hands/arms interact with them, etc. Don't be afraid to ride for a while that way. I only finally taped up my Nishiki last Saturday night in the wee hours before the Bike the Barns ride here in WI on Sunday.
I'll toss in a plug for St. Louis Bicycle Works, particularly their EBay store.....They use auctions, but seem to attract very little attention to interesting stuff....
You may well have blown that "little attention" cover just by posting here... But yeah, some definitely nice stuff, and several items with a BIN / auction option (including TWO sets of those symmetrics you couldn't quite fall in love with....).
madpogue is offline  
Old 09-29-22, 07:46 PM
  #43  
Full Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Sep 2019
Location: Tulsa, OK
Posts: 214

Bikes: 2005 Orbea Spirit + 2018 Specialized Diverge + 1974 Raleigh Competition + 1983 Centurion Pro Tour 15

Liked 236 Times in 98 Posts
Decals!



The bike was on hold while I made some choices, then waited for the Velocals envelope to arrive. Went all "brick red" with the right Tange ones, the correct or nearly so Centurion and ProTour15 ones, and a traditional style arrangement on the seat tube of stripes and a head badge. The other head badge didn't make it, but will be here soon.

There's also a little retro silver "Japan" because it makes me smile, remembering when those stickers became ubiquitous in this country.

Before doing those, I had to strip off the wax I had used on the frame, a liquid carnauba from Meguiar's that I wasn't happy with. Seemed like it really wanted to take on fingerprints. If you have a suggestion for a better, harder wax finish, I'd love to hear it.

Parts will be ready to go when the frame is.

The Suntour bar end shifters are here. They ratchet in one direction with just friction in the other. One is quite stiff. I assume I can clean and re-lubricate them like any others, but you know what they say about assuming. I'll dig around the forum for tips and see if I can find a diagram before starting in on them. The rubbery grips don't want to be removed ever again, so no dunking into degreaser, I guess.

Rear rack and panniers will finish it off in time for fall weather in Oklahoma.
​​​​

Last edited by dbhouston; 09-29-22 at 07:51 PM.
dbhouston is offline  
Likes For dbhouston:
Old 09-30-22, 12:34 PM
  #44  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Posts: 2,061
Liked 1,096 Times in 530 Posts
Wow this looks great with those decals.
polymorphself is offline  
Likes For polymorphself:
Old 09-30-22, 12:38 PM
  #45  
Senior Member
 
noobinsf's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Oakland, CA
Posts: 3,269

Bikes: '82 Univega Competizione, '72 Motobecane Grand Record, '83 Mercian KOM Touring, '85 Univega Alpina Uno, '76 Eisentraut Limited

Liked 1,214 Times in 705 Posts
Originally Posted by dbhouston

The Suntour bar end shifters are here. They ratchet in one direction with just friction in the other. One is quite stiff. I assume I can clean and re-lubricate them like any others, but you know what they say about assuming. I'll dig around the forum for tips and see if I can find a diagram before starting in on them.
​​​​
You can adjust the tension when you reassemble them after cleaning. Don't forget to use blue loctite on the little rounded locknut -- it's the part that is frequently lost on these.
noobinsf is offline  
Likes For noobinsf:
Old 09-30-22, 10:03 PM
  #46  
Full Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Sep 2019
Location: Tulsa, OK
Posts: 214

Bikes: 2005 Orbea Spirit + 2018 Specialized Diverge + 1974 Raleigh Competition + 1983 Centurion Pro Tour 15

Liked 236 Times in 98 Posts
As always, C&V commenters know their stuff! I didn't have much time this evening, but made some progress.
  • I gave it three coats of Mother's carnauba paste wax, and the surface seems very nice and is more resistant to fingerprints than the Meguiar's liquid produced.
  • Cabled up the brakes and was happy to see the pads fit behind the forks just fine with room to remove the wheel and tire.
  • Sure enough, Noobinsf, I'm missing one lock nut on the Suntour shifters. Hopefully, I'll get around to cabling them this weekend to see how things work.
At least it looks like a bicycle again!
dbhouston is offline  
Likes For dbhouston:
Old 09-30-22, 10:13 PM
  #47  
Senior Member
 
Sir_Name's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Connecticut
Posts: 3,448

Bikes: are fun!

Liked 865 Times in 274 Posts
Very cool. An Ď83 Pro Tour 15 grounded my interest in C&V quite a ways back now. I still have it, but itís unfortunately retired. The decals on chrome of yours reminds me of my BMX days back when. Looks slick. Enjoy, thatís a very nice platform to build any number of bikes from.

Donít try to disassemble the OEM shifters unless you want a puzzle. Barcons are a good choice for replacement as youíve done. Also, mind that rear derailleur. Ride on!
Sir_Name is offline  
Old 10-01-22, 08:37 PM
  #48  
Full Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Sep 2019
Location: Tulsa, OK
Posts: 214

Bikes: 2005 Orbea Spirit + 2018 Specialized Diverge + 1974 Raleigh Competition + 1983 Centurion Pro Tour 15

Liked 236 Times in 98 Posts
We have a bike!

Shifting works great in the stand. Will see on the road tomorrow. I've also made no real efforts to adjust the fit. I'll close the thread with sunshine pictures after that. If you spot any glaring errors, let me know. Really pleased with this ...



Last edited by dbhouston; 10-01-22 at 09:59 PM.
dbhouston is offline  
Likes For dbhouston:
Old 10-03-22, 08:55 AM
  #49  
Senior Member
 
cooperryder's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Dallas / Ft Worth
Posts: 1,188
Liked 1,623 Times in 429 Posts
It looks terrific!
Nice job!

I'm fond of Centurions and chrome frames so yours really appeals to me.

If I could find one in close to a 60 cm c-t I would jump on it.
cooperryder is offline  
Likes For cooperryder:
Old 10-03-22, 10:50 AM
  #50  
Veteran, Pacifist
 
Wildwood's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Seattle area
Posts: 13,445

Bikes: Bikes??? Thought this was social media?!?

Liked 4,984 Times in 2,293 Posts
What a good thread. Thanks dbhouston for all the incremental updates.
I owned a 1985 ProTour15. My first adult bike and only one for many years - served me well.

Prior to sale


It was one of five bikes sold to a BF member. Years ago.


But I lived - and started buying lighter, sportier, non-touring models. The only bike I kept at the time was an AD Olympian. The only one I really missed was the Bianchi Special with Ishiwata022.
__________________
Vintage, modern, e-road. It is a big cycling universe.

Last edited by Wildwood; 10-03-22 at 10:55 AM.
Wildwood is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Your Privacy Choices -

Copyright © 2024 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.