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1992 Trek Antelope 800

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1992 Trek Antelope 800

Old 12-18-22, 04:04 PM
  #1  
rje58_too
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1992 Trek Antelope 800

I happened onto one of these recently at very low cost. It's in pretty rough shape, of course it needs tubes and tires - not sure yet if the shifters would need to be replaced or not, but they well might.

Does anybody have any thoughts on this model? Is it worth the effort to put it back into riding condition? I'm not looking to resell it. I would either see how it rides as an extra backup (or maybe special purpose?) bike, or use it as a loaner for friends or perhaps give it away to someone who needs a bike.

Thanks in advance.
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Old 12-18-22, 05:25 PM
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Assuming the frame is in good condition, go for it. Trek steel MTBs - even the base models - are fine riders.

You'll probably want to consider doing a full rebuild, as rough shape + two decades can be pretty hard on internals & grease.
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Old 12-18-22, 06:32 PM
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Originally Posted by rje58_too View Post
I happened onto one of these recently at very low cost. It's in pretty rough shape, of course it needs tubes and tires - not sure yet if the shifters would need to be replaced or not, but they well might.

Does anybody have any thoughts on this model? Is it worth the effort to put it back into riding condition? I'm not looking to resell it. I would either see how it rides as an extra backup (or maybe special purpose?) bike, or use it as a loaner for friends or perhaps give it away to someone who needs a bike.

Thanks in advance.
You building out of love or to flip? if out of love, then I will not tell you no. if to flip, your time and whatever parts needed are a consideration you have to make.
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Old 12-18-22, 08:50 PM
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Sounds like a good gateway bike into the wonderful world of bike hoarding.
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Old 12-18-22, 09:05 PM
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I have a couple a few some Treks of this type and era in my back yard at the moment. They were intended to go to Rusty Spoke, but the Spoke is chock full o' bikes at the moment, and a few of them need their shifters either degunked or replaced.

I've seen them as entirely worthy of rebuilding, as they typically have good frames, decent components, and better-than-zero resale value.
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Old 12-18-22, 10:11 PM
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Originally Posted by RCMoeur View Post
I've seen them as entirely worthy of rebuilding, as they typically have good frames, decent components, and better-than-zero resale value.
This ^^

TREK's like the Antelope, and the early 800s, along with similar models from Giant and Specialized, are sort of the "Universal 26" Bikes". They're pretty standardized, and usually Japanese 3x7, so even a "parts -bin" build can produce a solid, functional bicycle.
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Old 12-18-22, 10:48 PM
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I agree with Richard and Ironfish about functional bicycles, although as Richard knows I prefer to replace gunky rapid shifters with friction thumbies on a basic transportation bike. But if the OP has any thought of flipping, I am seeing signs of the bottom falling out of the used bike market. These bikes are better for rebuilding than a lot of newer bikes, but better-than-zero resale value is not the same as profitable resale value.
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Old 12-18-22, 11:15 PM
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Thanks for the great replies, everyone! I am NOT looking to resell this one. I will either use it as an extra backup bike, or for use as a niche bike or as a loaner for friends who want to ride with us but don't want to lug their bike out our way, or who are visiting from out of town. I am going to start working on it tomorrow, figure out what parts I need (re: how much it will cost) and go from there. I will most likely move forward to make it ridable, barring some major setback when I start working on it.
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Old 12-19-22, 05:44 AM
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Do you have a bike co-op near you? That could be source of some cheap stuff.

Originally Posted by rje58_too View Post
Thanks for the great replies, everyone! I am NOT looking to resell this one. I will either use it as an extra backup bike, or for use as a niche bike or as a loaner for friends who want to ride with us but don't want to lug their bike out our way, or who are visiting from out of town. I am going to start working on it tomorrow, figure out what parts I need (re: how much it will cost) and go from there. I will most likely move forward to make it ridable, barring some major setback when I start working on it.
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Old 12-19-22, 09:42 AM
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Originally Posted by albrt View Post
I agree with Richard and Ironfish about functional bicycles, although as Richard knows I prefer to replace gunky rapid shifters with friction thumbies on a basic transportation bike. But if the OP has any thought of flipping, I am seeing signs of the bottom falling out of the used bike market. These bikes are better for rebuilding than a lot of newer bikes, but better-than-zero resale value is not the same as profitable resale value.
we’ve been able to ‘revive’ low end Shimano Rapidfire shifters that sat for decades with WD-40 and/or Tri-Flo

Grip Shift shifters are a good option for a bike like this if the original shifters need to be replaced

Grip Shift 400 - 500 - 600 series 7 speed shifters ... 400 series are fairly easy to find and are inexpensive ... pair with Dia Compe brake levers that are also fairly easy to find and inexpensive ... Dia Compe 7 is one example

mid-90’s STX / STX RC stuff can be found in good shape for reasonable priced

also - new 7 speed Rapidfire replacement shifters are still available - one example :
Shimano ST-EF65-7 3 x 7 Speed Brake Shifter Combination Lever
just recently saw them on Amazon for $30 (including shipping)

not a fan of thumb shifters ... been there done that ... lol

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Old 12-19-22, 02:58 PM
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Originally Posted by t2p View Post
we’ve been able to ‘revive’ low end Shimano Rapidfire shifters that sat for decades with WD-40 and/or Tri-Flo.
There was a whole other thread on this recently. Problem is, more often than not, WD-40, Tri-Flo, Clean Streak, or other solvents are only a temporary fix. As part of the Recycle Your Bicycle program, we fix up bikes for foster families all over the state, many of whom don't have a lot of mechanical capability. In the past, we discovered that a Rapidfire shifter that we flushed with Clean Streak and was working great when it left the workshop would stop working a couple months later (or less) when the solvent evaporated. The only long-term solution seems to be to get all that #%*$ Shimano grease out of the pawls and mechanism, and the best method has been soaking in an ultrasonic cleaner, working the pawls after every cycle until everything works freely - and then a couple more cycles for good measure. Let it dry, lube it with a low-residue bonding lube like moly disulfide, and it's good for a couple more decades.

Brifters, though, are a crapshoot, since the mechanism isn't accessible. Some I've been able to degunk with the ultrasonic, but others didn't turn out as well.
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Old 12-19-22, 04:31 PM
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I used CRC PowerLube in the red can to flush shifters. Solvent with PTFE (Teflon), so leaves a lubricant after the solvent does its thing. Works much better than typical solvents alone, and obviates the need for a separate lube. BITD, about $3 a can at auto parts stores, but I'm sure it's gone up since then.
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Old 12-19-22, 09:08 PM
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Originally Posted by jdawginsc View Post
Do you have a bike co-op near you? That could be source of some cheap stuff.
That's a good question! I will see if I can find one, locally.
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Old 12-20-22, 11:31 PM
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+1 on Trek 800's. I have two of them and got them both inexpensively. One at work and one at home. One was a commuter a 20 years ago when work was within reach, now it is a good bike for grocery runs, trail riding and riding with my wife (we haven't done that in too long). I also had a tag-a-log connected to the seat post and my daughter rode on the tag-a-long. These things are like Timex watches, well, probably better. Relatively inexpensive, not too fancy, not too delicate, work well and "They can take a lickin' and keep on tickin'" . No problems with shifting even though they are indexed, brakes are dependable, predictable and capable and all mechanical parts may not be super light but they work and last.

Put a seat on it that your butt agrees with, tires that suit the riding that you are doing and ride it and enjoy it.

If I only had to pick one bike, I would of course have a tough time, but the Trek 800 would be it. I wouldn't be the cool guy on BikeForums, but I not anyway.
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Old 12-21-22, 06:47 AM
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These fall into that grey area of "worth it or not?" and it really depends on condition and what it needs. It's easily possible to spend a couple hundred dollars on tires and tubes, chain and cassette, brake pads, cables and housings. It adds up. And that's assuming everything else can be reused. You start replacing shifters or other mechanicals (bottom bracket?) or replacing the saddle, and that adds to the cost even more. I always spend more on restoring a bike than the original purchase price, so I try to choose my restoration candidates carefully and consider what I'll have when I'm done.

That said, a Trek 800 is a good bike and a perfectly fine restoration candidate. Worse case, let's say you put $200-300 into it or maybe more, but then it's fully restored and like new, maybe better than new. That's a very good cheap bike that will last forever and serve you well. You couldn't go out and buy a new bike that nice for that kind of money.

It will be interesting once you get into it discovering what it really needs. The challenge with the shifters is that the combination shifter/brake levers available now do not support cantilever brakes. The EF-65's mentioned above work with V-brakes only, and the old ones that were switchable are pretty much unavailable. I have had good luck flushing them out with WD-40 and I do that annually anyway. Otherwise you'll have to go with separate trigger shifters and brake levers.
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Old 12-21-22, 12:07 PM
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which models were ‘switchable’ ? ... cantilever or V brake ...

earlier version of EF-65 - or another model ?
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Old 12-21-22, 12:11 PM
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Originally Posted by Jeff Neese View Post
These fall into that grey area of "worth it or not?" and it really depends on condition and what it needs. It's easily possible to spend a couple hundred dollars on tires and tubes, chain and cassette, brake pads, cables and housings. It adds up. And that's assuming everything else can be reused. You start replacing shifters or other mechanicals (bottom bracket?) or replacing the saddle, and that adds to the cost even more. I always spend more on restoring a bike than the original purchase price, so I try to choose my restoration candidates carefully and consider what I'll have when I'm done.
agree

for me the ‘line’ for bikes like this is often at the level of the frame ...

for steel it would be butted CrMo ... the difference in a lightweight butted steel frame vs a lower end steel frame can be fairly significant
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Old 12-21-22, 12:25 PM
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Originally Posted by t2p View Post
agree

for me the ‘line’ for bikes like this is often at the level of the frame ...

for steel it would be butted CrMo ... the difference in a lightweight butted steel frame vs a lower end steel frame can be fairly significant
That is true, I can't compare a basic cromo 4130 frame with a true temper oxp or reynolds 631/853 or even dedacciai dr zero or columbus cyber/genius/max frame. Quality of the tubing impacts a lot on the quality of the ride. The frame is often the heart of the bike.
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Old 12-22-22, 05:56 AM
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Originally Posted by t2p View Post
which models were ‘switchable’ ? ... cantilever or V brake ...

earlier version of EF-65 - or another model ?
Earlier versions of the EF65 and also the EF51, characterized by the "four finger" levers. The two-finger versions support V-brakes only. I have the old EF51 on several bikes, and one with the EF65. But the last build I needed them for a couple years ago, could not find them anywhere on the planet. I ended up going with Shimano Altus M315 trigger shifters, and some inexpensive Tektro brake levers. Works great.
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Old 12-22-22, 06:21 AM
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Originally Posted by t2p View Post
agree

for me the ‘line’ for bikes like this is often at the level of the frame ...

for steel it would be butted CrMo ... the difference in a lightweight butted steel frame vs a lower end steel frame can be fairly significant
Well, it can be as significant as a pound or two, if that's what you mean. The reason hi-ten bikes are usually so much heavier is that everything else on the bike is heavier too. Build that Trek 800 frame with higher-end components, especially lighter wheels, and it would give you 80-90% of the riding experience of the more expensive (and full DB chromoly) Trek 850.

The 800 under discussion has a chromoly frame, even if it is "basic" and may not even be butted. It's not a hi-ten frame, although the fork is. It's not going to be the best bike in anyone's stable, but it could end up a favorite. Everyone needs an old workhorse.
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Old 12-22-22, 06:46 AM
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Originally Posted by RCMoeur View Post
There was a whole other thread on this recently. Problem is, more often than not, WD-40, Tri-Flo, Clean Streak, or other solvents are only a temporary fix.
As in that thread, I have to disagree. I’ve had very good luck with flushing with WD-40 on my bikes and on bikes in my local co-op. Clean Streak is different from WD-40 in that it is a solvent only. WD-40 is about 75% solvent and 25% oil.

Originally Posted by t2p View Post
we’ve been able to ‘revive’ low end Shimano Rapidfire shifters that sat for decades with WD-40 and/or Tri-Flo

Grip Shift shifters are a good option for a bike like this if the original shifters need to be replaced

Grip Shift 400 - 500 - 600 series 7 speed shifters ... 400 series are fairly easy to find and are inexpensive ... pair with Dia Compe brake levers that are also fairly easy to find and inexpensive ... Dia Compe 7 is one example

mid-90’s STX / STX RC stuff can be found in good shape for reasonable priced

also - new 7 speed Rapidfire replacement shifters are still available - one example :
Shimano ST-EF65-7 3 x 7 Speed Brake Shifter Combination Lever
just recently saw them on Amazon for $30 (including shipping)

not a fan of thumb shifters ... been there done that ... lol
Not a fan of combination levers. If something goes wrong, you replace both the brake lever and shifter. A better shifter to add to the list is the microSHIFT Mezzo. It’s a shifter pod rather than a combination lever and is very cheap. REI has them for $19 which seems to be the going price for a set.
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Old 12-22-22, 12:24 PM
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The white bike here is an 820 Antelope; I think 1992, with white paint with black "splash" and sky-blue accents. CrMo frame, triple crank, wheels still true. Suggest the "full replace" on the shifters, like the Shimano Tourney SL-TX30 you get on a google search. I wouldn't recommend changing the basic distinct brake vs. shifter design; keep it simple—still a good ride for 'round-town when I'm going to lock it to a signpost. NOT a light bike; steel is real (heavy). And don't start thinking this is anything more than a "good, solid old steel hardtail."
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Old 12-22-22, 01:11 PM
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I bought this bike brand new bike in 1992 and this became my everything bike for over 2 decades. I added a Trek branded back rack and nice Mountain Coop panniers to both commute to work and fill full of groceries. The steel frame was heavy as heck and the components were base Shimano like most of those mtn. bikes of the day. Unfortunately, I didn't do well at maintaining it and replaced it just the other year.
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Old 01-03-23, 07:26 PM
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Thanks for everyone's input! $148.65 and some effort (I had help with the shifters/brakes) later, it's ridable! That is to say, man! It rides like a dream! Here's an "after" photo:


1992 Trek 800 Antelope

In my first post in this thread, I noted that I picked up this Trek VERY inexpensively.... as in, just my gas cost to drive about 10 minutes and pick it up from someone who was going to discard it!

I've only got about 4 miles on it right now, but so far I LOVE IT!

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Old 01-04-23, 07:53 AM
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That's exactly what my bike looked like brand new, same colour and everything. Really looks great, enjoy it.
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