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Your #1, and why

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Your #1, and why

Old 01-01-23, 12:54 PM
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Originally Posted by Bianchigirll
The "Cantaloupe Express" Great paint
Yes!!!
The 1980’s was just over the top.


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Old 01-01-23, 02:59 PM
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For mountain bikes, my 2003 Curtlo Epic Mountaineer is my hands down #1. Handbuilt by Doug Curtiss for me 20 years ago. Wow, its been that long already? In that time, the only hard parts I've changed are the seat, handlebars and stem. Over the past couple of years I've fallen in love with swept back style handlebars, and they work so well off road! When I see other bikes (newer or better equipped) I still think to myself "My bike is nicer".

For everything else bikes, currently my number 1 is this 2009 Kona Smoke I've been fiddling with the past few months:



It's got everything you'd need to be a commuter, a touring bike, and even an off road/gravelly bike kind of thing. Super comfortable, durable, and best of all - cheap!
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Old 01-02-23, 01:17 AM
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There are many beautiful bikes in near mint condition shown. Thanks for that.

The thing is, I may not really understand the OP's question.

He says he doesn't have a history of riding road bikes, yet everyone posted pics of some very serious road bikes.

I have more than one bike but for all intents and purposes, I might as well have only one - a Bob Jackson road bike.




Why, you ask? Well, I have been riding this bike for 50 years.

It has mostly been ridden for exercise but also in fast club rides, bike camping, commuting,... you name it.

I don't ride off-road, so that reason is off the table. I built a nice bike for commuting to work but I drive, instead.

There would have to be a distinct reason to NOT ride this bike before I'd go out on another.

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Old 01-02-23, 02:36 PM
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This one is #1.You've all seen it before.


It edges out these by not much, but enough. It also beats out the De Rosa I traded for. Again, not by much, but enough. The Eisentraut is from 1978, the Cooper from 1982ish.



This one is another 1965ish frame and is more or less an identical frame to the silver one up top but with Eroica-compliant components. Great bike, but Campy 10sp drivetrains are just better, at least to this heathen, so it is in with the Eisentraut and the Cooper. Also, the gawd-awful Universal 51 brakes have been replaced with the much more acceptable Universal 61 center pulls.
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Old 01-02-23, 02:50 PM
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This isn’t the bike I ride the most nowadays, but it would definitely be the last one to go. I like the looks of it and it has a very nice ride. Mainly, though, it’s because the frame was originally my brother’s. I bought it from him in 2002 when his wife was pressuring him to thin the herd. He passed away six years ago.
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Old 01-02-23, 03:10 PM
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My #1 is always my next build. What else would be the point?

So currently it is a Gazelle Champion Mondial semi-race that's sitting on the stand.

​​​​​​​As bought:

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Old 01-02-23, 04:03 PM
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Mine would have to be my 1978 Trek 930. I ride it more than my other (more collectible) bikes. It just disappears under me and wants to go.


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Old 01-02-23, 04:51 PM
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Originally Posted by jeirvine
Mine would have to be my 1978 Trek 930. I ride it more than my other (more collectible) bikes. It just disappears under me and wants to go.


No love for the Coppi...you need a nice Basso Gap to fill in...the gap...?
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Old 01-02-23, 04:52 PM
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Originally Posted by Oldguyonoldbike

This isn’t the bike I ride the most nowadays, but it would definitely be the last one to go. I like the looks of it and it has a very nice ride. Mainly, though, it’s because the frame was originally my brother’s. I bought it from him in 2002 when his wife was pressuring him to thin the herd. He passed away six years ago.
Beautiful.
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Old 01-02-23, 08:17 PM
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Not sure this counts, and or, is in the spirit of this thread - but I have a NOS 55cm 1993 Bridgestone XO-1 that has never even had a pedal threaded on it.​​​​​​​
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Old 01-02-23, 08:20 PM
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Originally Posted by jeirvine
... It just disappears under me and wants to go.
That is what makes a bike great. When you can ride it and seem to be just flying over the pavement. It allows you to have that out of body experience. It is rare but a wonderful experience when you have it.

I also fail to restrain my bike. It also just wants to go, and to go fast. After all, it is red, so maybe that explains it.

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Old 01-02-23, 08:47 PM
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Originally Posted by bikingshearer
This one is #1.You've all seen it before.


Question for you - What year is this bike? I don't know much about Cinellis, but I'm trying to learn more. Is this a Supercorsa? Are their certain years or generations that have are considered more desireable? is a '65 comparable to a '78, for instance?
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Old 01-02-23, 09:42 PM
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Originally Posted by AdventureManCO
Question for you - What year is this bike? I don't know much about Cinellis, but I'm trying to learn more. Is this a Supercorsa? Are their certain years or generations that have are considered more desireable? is a '65 comparable to a '78, for instance?
Just my .02, but I see 4 eras of Cinelli. First is 1939-1947 when Arrigo and Giotto ran the business. This is stupid rare, esoteric stuff that goes for real money. Second is after Cino bought the business from his brothers and early in his tenure, 1947-1960. Still rare stuff and goes for good money. Next is the heyday, 1960-1978. Great reputation, great stuff. And finally 1978 to now. Cino sold the business to Antonio Colombo in 1978 and has continued to make a fine product.
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Old 01-02-23, 09:44 PM
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^^^^^


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Old 01-02-23, 09:49 PM
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Originally Posted by bikingshearer
This one is #1.You've all seen it before.




This one is another 1965ish frame and is more or less an identical frame to the silver one up top but with Eroica-compliant components. Great bike, but Campy 10sp drivetrains are just better, at least to this heathen, so it is in with the Eisentraut and the Cooper. Also, the gawd-awful Universal 51 brakes have been replaced with the much more acceptable Universal 61 center pulls.


So cool and so Bad Azz.
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Old 01-02-23, 10:27 PM
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Originally Posted by don compton
Now there's a bike built to enjoy riding.👍🏻
So we need you to quote the post you're referencing so we know what bike you're talking about.
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Old 01-02-23, 10:27 PM
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Love this bike

Originally Posted by brewerkz
late 50s/60s Wally Green....this bike captured my interest to pursue earlier road bicycles.

This bike looks like it was designed to enjoy an all day ride.👍🏻
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Old 01-02-23, 10:34 PM
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You all have really beautiful bicycles and I do admire them greatly.
I got this one off of Craig's for $45 in some sorry state of neglect. But when it came around after a deep cleaning and restoration - the bicycle quickly became an instant favorite to me.
1981 Univega Specialissima - Great Touring Bike - Currently my "Go To" bike.It really is a very smooth riding comfortable ride - not harsh like a racing bike. True Blue Touring imho...


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Old 01-02-23, 10:34 PM
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Deleted

Originally Posted by merziac
So we need you to quote the post you're referencing so we know what bike you're talking about.
I deleted the message.
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Old 01-02-23, 11:40 PM
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Originally Posted by don compton
I deleted the message.
Saw that, no worries.
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Old 01-02-23, 11:55 PM
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Originally Posted by AdventureManCO
Question for you - What year is this bike? I don't know much about Cinellis, but I'm trying to learn more. Is this a Supercorsa? Are their certain years or generations that have are considered more desireable? is a '65 comparable to a '78, for instance?
Both of my Cinelli frames are Speciale Corsas from about 1965. In this era (and up to when Cino Cinelli sold the company c.1978), the serial numbers are useless for dating the frame. The numbers are four digits and seem to have been randomly assigned. For example, my two frames from c.1965 are numbered 14xx and 87xx, while an ealy 1970s I used to own was numbered 15xx. Go figure. The best way I have found to date Cinellis from 1978 or earlier (the pre-sale era) is to compare the frame's features to Velo Retro's Cinelli timeline. That's how I determined the approximate dates for mine.

My mid-1960s frames are tall (64cm ctc) and long (61.5cm top tubes). Both have longish chain stays (44.5cm), long wheelbases (108cm) and moderate angles (73* head angle, 72.5* seat angle). They were designed to race all day on European roads that still included plenty of kilometers of dirt and gravel along with the ever-increasing kilos of paving. The early 1970s frame I had (a bit too small) had the same angles, but shorter chainstays (43.5cm) and wheelbase (102.5cm) to reflect the better roads and the trend toward shorter, more upright frames. My understanding is that the shorter/more upright trend continued on up to the 1978 sale. Others here know more about that history than do I.

BTW, Supercorsas and Speciale Corsas are both names of Cinelli's top-tier road frame. One was the official name (Supercorsa, I think) and the other (Speciale Corsa, I think) was used for a while because the decal printer screwed up and Cinelli used them anyway until they ran out. I call mine Speciale Corsas because that is how how they were badged.

I personally am only really interested in Cinellis with the old-style graphics, which means from 1978-79 or earlier. Those older graphics were on the Cinellis I lusted after as a teenager, so that's what I want now. I got very lucky - two in my size more or less fell into my lap, neither was the product of a concerted search. The more recent Cinellis are beautiful (the red and blue ones from the 1990s and 2000s are stunning) and plenty of C&V members have 'em, ride 'em and love 'em, but they don't inspire the same nostalgic pitter-patter in my heart. Understand, that is just me. YMMV.

If you want to learn about Cinellis, a good place to start is the write-up done by Michael Kone and incorporated in Sheldon Brown's (may he rest in peace) fantastic website. It was written 25 years ago or more and the dollar figures may or may not make sense today, but the general info is still valid and the opinions are based on actual knowledge. Take it away, Mr. Kone:

Among the most sought-after of all vintage lightweights. A few heretics claim they are over rated. I say take a closer look and get a clue - or buy a Cannondale. Many Cinelli frames show exquisite mitering, smooth and even brazing, and lots of lug thinning. This is even true for many examples from the early 50's! Sure they have deep ugly file marks too - but that is only the surface! Add to the equation that many ride pretty close to perfection - at least as some would define it. Cinelli frames are also a visual feast with Italian style that just won't quit. In Japan, appreciation for Cinelli products is near cult-like. Over the past several years domestic prices have soared for prime examples. A Cinelli is an icon of cycling tradition. Sure, a few Cinelli frames have some lapses here and there - but don't miss the point. Cinelli frames defined the paradigm of a quality racing bike for decades.Late 40's to mid 50's models with Cinelli crest decal on fork blades are very rare! Road models under 58cm are perhaps worth about $4000. Track bikes, lower end tourers, or large bikes are worth perhaps $2,500. Mid 50's to late 60's top road models under 58cm should be worth $2,500.

Models with rare parts, such as early Record cranks with the raised lip around the pedal threads should be worth perhaps $3,500. Size will matter.

N.R. equipped bikes from 1968-1997 are prone to wide value fluctuations. For a brief period, such bikes in smaller sizes were very valuable in Japan. Prices have since fallen quite a bit due to Dollar/Yen changes and general economic conditions. Domestic prices now similar to those currently being paid by Japanese buyers. Figure bikes in guideline condition sized from 53cm to 59cm are worth about $2,400. Larger bikes seem to be worth somewhat less, while very large bikes (above 62cm) are probably worth only about $1,200. Smaller sizes in silver may be worth a bit more to buyers in Japan. It seems that Japanese buyers love Cinelli bikes in Silver!

Cinelli track bikes are worth about $1,500. Chrome models are worth perhaps a bit more as is always the case.

Model B Cinelli bikes are very nice but generally not worth more than $1,200. 4

Around 1978 Cinelli was sold to the Columbo family. There are bikes with either the new or old logo's from this period. Until about 1980, while the graphics could go either way, the brake bridges and bottom bracket shells had new Cinelli logs making these bikes recognizable. Headbadge examples are worth more, perhaps $1,600, although modern logo bikes from the same period are just as good. From around 1980 until perhaps 1981 or 1982, Cinelli bikes with the new logo using a 26.2 seatpost and the lugs with 3 holes in each were very nice. Many do not consider these to be "real" Cinelli bikes, but they are at least as good as many of the earlier ones. Apparently either some very good builders from the previous period continued on, or work was contracted to outside builders of considerable talent. These bikes from this period deserve to be classics in their own right. Their geometry is upright, yet the ride is comfortable. These are bikes designed for the fast short distance riding so common in the United States. They, nonetheless, will handle mountain descents with ease as well! These bikes are worth perhaps $1,500 and are worth every penny and then some.

Sometime around 1983 it all ended. The 26.2 sleeved seat lug was replaced wit a different cast model that used a 27.2 post. The familiar 3 hole lugs were gone as well. Quality during the following years took a pretty heavy hit as well. Many examples didn't even have chrome lugs. These examples in S.R. are worth about $800. By the late 80's quality improved and chrome lugs returned. It just, however, isn't the same.
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Old 01-02-23, 11:59 PM
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Originally Posted by merziac
So cool and so Bad Azz.
They are Bad Azz enough to haul my Fat Azz up, down and around the Bay Area.
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Old 01-03-23, 12:27 AM
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Originally Posted by bikingshearer
They are Bad Azz enough to haul my Fat Azz up, down and around the Bay Area.
Exactly, just like me and mine.
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Old 01-03-23, 01:44 PM
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I posted elsewhere in this thread that my 80 Trek 414 would be the last I'd give up, due to its versatility. My favorite one to ride, however, is the 92 Paramount PDG5. I also have a Trek 930, a 79, and it used to be my favorite bike, but as time has passed I'm preferring the stiffness of the Tange Prestige over the Columbus SP.
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Old 01-03-23, 02:17 PM
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If I was in as good a riding condition as in 2017, I could pick one. Today I can't. The why is the problem because most of them are number one for different reasons.
For the early '70's, the number one is the Bianchi which I haven't even ridden! Looks pretty good with the dent in the stay you can't see without looking for it and the filled, drilled holes in the top tube.
71BianchiDone14 on Flickr

For the dt shifters bikes, it is likely the Colnago even though it is a bit small. I have put several K miles on it and it was a revelation of what a good ride can be when I started on riding it. I also renewed my preference for sew-ups. The Bianchi hasn't entered the completion yet.
1983 Colnago Superissimo on Flickr

I have three other bikes in the '80s, one is still a frame set but has been ridden for a short period of time, a Trek 610. Should finish this off and evaluate the ride with longer wheelbase and rear stays.
118_PaTrek on Flickr
The other hasn't even been on a multi decade mile ride yet but seriously makes a really good impression, Trek 760 with Superbe Pro components. Sleeper with its beat-up rattle can paint and '85 colored fork. It feels so solid when riding. With all the bending of the fork, it is easy to do hands free even with a 38mm offset.
P1040796 on Flickr

The Pinarello has a lot of miles on it since purchase and is very easy to ride. With the conversion to 9v Racing T with the triple, it suites my poor condition needs. Rarely use the 30 but it is there. The only really reason for not being number one is the condition of the paint. The reality is I like a good-looking bike, This has signs of having been one.
P1050224 on Flickr

Having gone on a ride yesterday with this one, today it is number one. Although it doesn't have the low gear of the Pin, it is close enough for my usual ride. It looks good, with 10v Record it performs really well. I need to sort out the saddle yet.
P1040420 on Flickr

Just another reason to post pics!

OOPs! just realized this is an older pic. Stem and post replaced.
P1050283 by superissimo_83, on Flickr
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