Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Classic & Vintage
Reload this Page >

Huffy + Campagnolo Super Record = The Ultimate C&V Sacrilege build

Notices
Classic & Vintage This forum is to discuss the many aspects of classic and vintage bicycles, including musclebikes, lightweights, middleweights, hi-wheelers, bone-shakers, safety bikes and much more.

Huffy + Campagnolo Super Record = The Ultimate C&V Sacrilege build

Old 02-20-23, 10:50 AM
  #51  
Bikes are okay, I guess.
 
thumpism's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Location: Richmond, Virginia
Posts: 9,114

Bikes: Waterford Paramount Touring, Giant CFM-2, Raleigh Sports 3-speeds in M23 & L23, Schwinn Cimarron oddball build, Marin Palisades Trail dropbar conversion, Nishiki Cresta GT

Mentioned: 68 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2643 Post(s)
Liked 2,423 Times in 1,543 Posts
"He just don't know when to quit."

These words have been uttered more than once through history and are not generally intended to be a compliment.
thumpism is offline  
Likes For thumpism:
Old 02-20-23, 11:12 AM
  #52  
Purist Destroyer
Thread Starter
 
AdventureManCO's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: The Le Grande HQ
Posts: 2,184

Bikes: The Campagnolo Huffy w/ Home Depot tubulars

Mentioned: 27 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 965 Post(s)
Liked 2,923 Times in 1,143 Posts
Originally Posted by RB1-luvr
this is a great read. I'm looking forward to more.

Huffy drop bar bikes have a place in my heart, as I rode one in high school to work 8 miles each way from Columbia, CT to Willimantic, CT as a stockboy at Benny's Home and Auto. At night in the dark I timed myself getting home. No lights, no blinkies, just pure luck I'm still alive.

I had a Sante Fe like this:

Had a few close calls as a kid myself. Thank you for sharing your story!
AdventureManCO is offline  
Likes For AdventureManCO:
Old 02-20-23, 11:23 AM
  #53  
Purist Destroyer
Thread Starter
 
AdventureManCO's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: The Le Grande HQ
Posts: 2,184

Bikes: The Campagnolo Huffy w/ Home Depot tubulars

Mentioned: 27 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 965 Post(s)
Liked 2,923 Times in 1,143 Posts
Originally Posted by beng1
...which may help in climbing some hills, that is the only advantage....

...So the only disadvantage these bikes have is going up hills...

Thank you for your interest in this project and your story. That is a great picture! Much appreciated.

From your experience, it sounds like the only advantage that lighter parts will have is to make it easier to go up hills, which is perfect, since you also mention that hills are the only disadvantage. Well, that and the stiffness, but we'll work around that. I'm delighted to know that your experience is close to a high-end bike, apart from the weight. The weight, we can deal with (to a point)...

I don't think we will be saving much from the bike, as to put back on the original parts would make the bike significantly worse. Even if I was to remove the Campy gear off of it (won't happen), it would be so much easier to just throw a Cyclone II on there or something, rather than the original running gear.

Last edited by AdventureManCO; 02-20-23 at 11:42 AM.
AdventureManCO is offline  
Old 02-20-23, 11:40 AM
  #54  
Purist Destroyer
Thread Starter
 
AdventureManCO's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: The Le Grande HQ
Posts: 2,184

Bikes: The Campagnolo Huffy w/ Home Depot tubulars

Mentioned: 27 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 965 Post(s)
Liked 2,923 Times in 1,143 Posts
Originally Posted by dddd
Lucky to find your dream "grail" bike...
I just now caught this...lol touche my friend!

1000% agree on the saddle. I got a taste of that OG saddle...

Bike weighs 36.4lbs in complete stock form. I took a bit of notice in the frame sizes, not a whole lot, but I'm grateful it was the larger size as well. Even though it probably adds quite a bit more weight, it is real nice being able to kick up that stem to be level with the bars - I'm all over the French fit of this thing.

I really appreciate your experience and recommendations, although we will be going full elite, retro connoisseur build on this one, going as high-end as we possibly can.

I'm not sure if I really stated the goal for this project. Well I guess in a sense, yes it would be great to get it lighter weight and maybe make it a better feeling or riding bicycle. All those goals are secondary. All those little bits and bobs that folks stared at through the glass cabinets of their favorite bike shop, drooling for hours on end after their paper route ended each day when they were kids back in the 70s or 80s? That's what I want on this bike. Just for fun. Just for the reaction. To start conversations. To look and to laugh, to realize much of life is absurd and to take things in stride, with a lighter heart. We need some of that these days. Some may laugh, some may sneer, some may cry, some may remember something nostalgic, some may get triggered or grouchy. I love it, all of it. It's something anyone and everybody can have an opinion about, good or bad. I think that is really the point. So please feel free to support or flame away, although death threats are best left to a PM
AdventureManCO is offline  
Likes For AdventureManCO:
Old 02-20-23, 11:43 AM
  #55  
Purist Destroyer
Thread Starter
 
AdventureManCO's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: The Le Grande HQ
Posts: 2,184

Bikes: The Campagnolo Huffy w/ Home Depot tubulars

Mentioned: 27 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 965 Post(s)
Liked 2,923 Times in 1,143 Posts
Originally Posted by PatTheSlat
I love this.

Be ready to come up with some sort of shim for the front derailleur, I bet that seat tube is 25.4 OD instead of 28.6.
Yep, everything is going to need a shim, including one or two things that may need a negative shim...
AdventureManCO is offline  
Likes For AdventureManCO:
Old 02-20-23, 11:45 AM
  #56  
Purist Destroyer
Thread Starter
 
AdventureManCO's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: The Le Grande HQ
Posts: 2,184

Bikes: The Campagnolo Huffy w/ Home Depot tubulars

Mentioned: 27 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 965 Post(s)
Liked 2,923 Times in 1,143 Posts
Originally Posted by repechage
A Campagnolo formfactor headset may not fit, even with reaming, facing.



...at least hoping
AdventureManCO is offline  
Likes For AdventureManCO:
Old 02-20-23, 11:46 AM
  #57  
Purist Destroyer
Thread Starter
 
AdventureManCO's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: The Le Grande HQ
Posts: 2,184

Bikes: The Campagnolo Huffy w/ Home Depot tubulars

Mentioned: 27 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 965 Post(s)
Liked 2,923 Times in 1,143 Posts
Originally Posted by RustyJames
Maybe the Huff-y parts could be donated to someone who wants to put them on their De Rosa for an opposite kind of build.
100% support this
AdventureManCO is offline  
Old 02-20-23, 11:53 AM
  #58  
Live not by lies.
 
Join Date: Nov 2020
Posts: 1,306

Bikes: BigBox bikes.

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 857 Post(s)
Liked 779 Times in 581 Posts
I dig it.
Glad to read of the fun youíre having.
Beng1 also.

Love the craftsmanship evident in the dropout brazing.

My wife has an old step through suburban she doesnít ride. Iím thinking of tacking 7/8 unistrut through the 2 downtubes and headtube, protruding to mount a rack. And crimping rear end and switching forks to go bigger 559 tires.
SkinGriz is offline  
Likes For SkinGriz:
Old 02-20-23, 12:13 PM
  #59  
Not in charge of anything
 
roadcrankr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Glendora, CA
Posts: 466

Bikes: Merlin Extralight '94 & Cannondale Supersix '15

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 254 Post(s)
Liked 310 Times in 182 Posts
Originally Posted by 52telecaster
During the 80s I built bikes in department stores. Huffys were not fun but as heavy as they seem, Murrays we're usually way heavier. I'm glad I don't have to relive those days.
I built Huffys in '78 for a big dept store. Every model they sold. Brought in my own wrenches.
The wheels on the rim break (sic) models never seemed true. And, if I didn't adjust the breaks (sic), somebody would surely die on it.
Might go three days between my part-time shifts, come back in and they sold half of the display models!
The store failed to charge a premium for the assembled bike. Evidently, it was their attempt at keeping me away from customers.


During summer school in my teens, I put together a ratty-looking Varsity with a cheap sew-up front wheel.
Probably dropped the weight by three pounds! And enabled me to pop wheelies.
Even with a paper-thin cable lockset, nobody dared steal that sucker. (In all honesty, my brother stole that bike for me.)
No doubt, would-be thieves took one look at the front tubular and thought there's no way they would ever ride sewups.

Wonderful thread. Let us know if you need any components. I could probably part with bottom bracket or headset or bars.
roadcrankr is offline  
Likes For roadcrankr:
Old 02-20-23, 12:29 PM
  #60  
Crawlin' up, flyin' down
 
bikingshearer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Democratic Peoples' Republic of Berkeley
Posts: 5,410

Bikes: 1967 Paramount; 1982-ish Ron Cooper; 1978 Eisentraut "A"; two mid-1960s Cinelli Speciale Corsas; and others in various stages of non-rideability.

Mentioned: 37 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 911 Post(s)
Liked 2,107 Times in 889 Posts
Originally Posted by Andy_K
I would expect 21.1, which was the size used by low-end Schwinns. That's what I found on my Huffy AeroWind.

BTW, you beat me to the punch, but I'm totally planning to do something like this with the AeroWind. I was thinking of starting a "Lipstick on a Pig" challenge to see how many other people would be willing to do something similar.

So, let me formally introduce you to the competition:



Someone had already done me the favor of recycling most of the original parts. I got this as seen above. The seller was asking $10, but I only had a twenty, so I gave him double his asking price. I'm very glad they left the seatpost, because I'm not sure I'd be able to find a replacement.

The AeroWind may not be as Le Grand as yours, but it's definitely got your commercial beat.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jMgYNm4Q6dM

So aerodynamic, you have to wear a loose flappy jacket to slow yourself down to a manageable speed!

My plan is to go with modern indexed shifting, but not Super Record.

My biggest concern is that I think this might have originally come with 26x1-3/8" wheels. I'm not sure 700c will fit in there.
Two sentences at the end of the video that never in a miliion years should have been back-to-back: "Huffy: the ultimate riding experience. Available at Toys-R-Us."
__________________
"I'm in shape -- round is a shape." Andy Rooney
bikingshearer is offline  
Likes For bikingshearer:
Old 02-20-23, 12:40 PM
  #61  
Senior Member
 
oldbobcat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Boulder County, CO
Posts: 4,246

Bikes: '80 Masi Gran Criterium, '12 Trek Madone, early '60s Frejus track

Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 458 Post(s)
Liked 380 Times in 297 Posts
Originally Posted by AdventureManCO
'The actual bike'

The good news: The wheels turn?
The bad news: I'm more of a glass-half-full kinda guy. The wheels turn!


This photo took more effort than it looks
I can tell by looking at the geometry that this bike will have the kind of ride that "just disappears beneath you."
oldbobcat is offline  
Old 02-20-23, 02:13 PM
  #62  
Purist Destroyer
Thread Starter
 
AdventureManCO's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: The Le Grande HQ
Posts: 2,184

Bikes: The Campagnolo Huffy w/ Home Depot tubulars

Mentioned: 27 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 965 Post(s)
Liked 2,923 Times in 1,143 Posts
Originally Posted by oldbobcat
"...the kind of ride that "just disappears beneath you."
AdventureManCO is offline  
Likes For AdventureManCO:
Old 02-20-23, 02:22 PM
  #63  
Bikes are okay, I guess.
 
thumpism's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Location: Richmond, Virginia
Posts: 9,114

Bikes: Waterford Paramount Touring, Giant CFM-2, Raleigh Sports 3-speeds in M23 & L23, Schwinn Cimarron oddball build, Marin Palisades Trail dropbar conversion, Nishiki Cresta GT

Mentioned: 68 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2643 Post(s)
Liked 2,423 Times in 1,543 Posts
It would be an interesting exercise to complete this build and begin another using a high quality frameset built up with low end (steel) components to see if there any validity to the speculation as to what makes the greatest difference ridewise. I'll go out on a limb and guess that your Huffy would do at least as well as the proposed mystery bike, maybe even better (strike me dead for saying that). I have a steel double-plateau crankset to fit a square taper BB that I'd be willing to donate for that project.

By the way, O.M.A.S is boxed up and addressed. Now I'm just delaying a trip to the post office in order to drive you nucking futs.
thumpism is offline  
Likes For thumpism:
Old 02-20-23, 02:57 PM
  #64  
Purist Destroyer
Thread Starter
 
AdventureManCO's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: The Le Grande HQ
Posts: 2,184

Bikes: The Campagnolo Huffy w/ Home Depot tubulars

Mentioned: 27 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 965 Post(s)
Liked 2,923 Times in 1,143 Posts
Originally Posted by thumpism
Now I'm just delaying a trip to the post office in order to drive you nucking futs.
This one gets it

I'd be willing to take up that challenge - if anyone would like to send me their De Rosa Pro, Colnago Super, Cinelli SC, Raleigh Professional or Bianchi X4/Specialissima, I'd be happy to move the parts from this bike over to the new frame. I guess I would even take a Herse or Singer, maybe I might accept a Masi or Confente. As long as they're okay with me cutting off the BB and tacking on an American-sized BB shell.

Last edited by AdventureManCO; 02-20-23 at 03:05 PM.
AdventureManCO is offline  
Likes For AdventureManCO:
Old 02-20-23, 04:25 PM
  #65  
Ride, Wrench, Swap, Race
 
dddd's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Northern California
Posts: 9,001

Bikes: Cheltenham-Pedersen racer, Boulder F/S Paris-Roubaix, Varsity racer, '52 Christophe, '62 Continental, '92 Merckx, '75 Limongi, '76 Presto, '72 Gitane SC, '71 Schwinn SS, etc.

Mentioned: 131 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1485 Post(s)
Liked 1,163 Times in 786 Posts
With the OP's bike having a leftward pull to the steering, the fix will be to move the front tire contact patch toward the left.

Start by examining the centering of the tire under the fork crown.

If the tire is toward the left side between the fork legs, the fix is as simple as filing the left dropout slot deeper by small increments until the tire is nearly centered.
This will tilt the wheel such that the tire contact patch moves toward the left, correcting the steering issue.

If the tire appears to be nearer to the right fork leg, then a different fix is indicated, simply bending the left fork leg toward the left by perhaps several millimeters.
This will not only move the hub and tire contact patch to the left (thus having a corrective effect on the steering), it will also solve your hub spacing problem at the dropouts.

Be careful about over-correcting the depth of the axle slot. Be doubly careful not to buckle the fork leg if/when bending it toward the left side.
You can lay the bike on it's side with the left handlebar drop on solid ground, then use your foot to push the left fork dropout and leg down away from the right leg.
I recommend using a stack of boards under the left dropout to limit how far that the left fork leg can yield downward, the better to prevent possibly buckling it!!!
Keep a measuring device at hand while adjusting dropout spacing to keep track of your progress. Just a few millimeters of change can often be enough to effect steering corrections, and that is likely about how much you'll need to open the forks out to 100mm of any current/traditional racing wheelset.
The trick is to arrive at a tire centered under the crown AND neutral steering at the same time.
The fork leg on this bike is fortunately made of relatively ductile steel, just don't let it yield to poorly-controlled leg force.

That Huffy Aerowind was offered with different wheel sizes corresponding to frame size. I would love to find such a 24" frame (made for 27" wheels).
Here's my Chromed 24" Huffy frame that I am now considering mounting a pair of dumpster-sourced(!) Record-11 levers onto:
dddd is offline  
Old 02-20-23, 06:02 PM
  #66  
I don't know.
 
RB1-luvr's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: South Meriden, CT
Posts: 1,846

Bikes: '90 B'stone RB-1, '92 B'stone RB-2, '89 SuperGo Access Comp, '03 Access 69er, '23 Trek 520, '14 Ritchey Road Logic, '09 Kestrel Evoke, '08 Windsor Tourist, '17 Surly Wednesday, '89 Centurion Accordo, '15 CruX, '17 Ridley X-Night

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 267 Post(s)
Liked 675 Times in 359 Posts
I converted this Huffy to a single speed years ago and sold it eventually. It would have been a good candidate for upgrades perhaps.


kinda cool that it had the Olympic pursuit bike looking frame, wheel disc and 26-24 inch wheel combo.
RB1-luvr is offline  
Likes For RB1-luvr:
Old 02-20-23, 08:30 PM
  #67  
Ride, Wrench, Swap, Race
 
dddd's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Northern California
Posts: 9,001

Bikes: Cheltenham-Pedersen racer, Boulder F/S Paris-Roubaix, Varsity racer, '52 Christophe, '62 Continental, '92 Merckx, '75 Limongi, '76 Presto, '72 Gitane SC, '71 Schwinn SS, etc.

Mentioned: 131 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1485 Post(s)
Liked 1,163 Times in 786 Posts
Originally Posted by RB1-luvr
I converted this Huffy to a single speed years ago and sold it eventually. It would have been a good candidate for upgrades perhaps.


kinda cool that it had the Olympic pursuit bike looking frame, wheel disc and 26-24 inch wheel combo.

Cool and a half!!!

Digging that alloy chainring spider and that reversed saddle clamp.

Wondering what the collector appeal of a bike like this might "peak" at (???).
dddd is offline  
Likes For dddd:
Old 02-20-23, 11:40 PM
  #68  
Banned.
 
Drillium Dude's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: PAZ
Posts: 12,394
Mentioned: 255 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2586 Post(s)
Liked 4,819 Times in 1,709 Posts
Originally Posted by RB1-luvr

I had a Sante Fe like this:


With a wheelbase like that (helped immensely by that outrageous fork rake), I'd bet most anyone could easily affect a full clothing change - while on the move

DD
Drillium Dude is offline  
Likes For Drillium Dude:
Old 02-20-23, 11:54 PM
  #69  
ambulatory senior
 
52telecaster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Location: Peoria Il
Posts: 6,104

Bikes: Austro Daimler modified by Gugie! Raleigh Professional and lots of other bikes.

Mentioned: 72 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1879 Post(s)
Liked 3,291 Times in 1,517 Posts
Originally Posted by roadcrankr
I built Huffys in '78 for a big dept store. Every model they sold. Brought in my own wrenches.
The wheels on the rim break (sic) models never seemed true. And, if I didn't adjust the breaks (sic), somebody would surely die on it.
Might go three days between my part-time shifts, come back in and they sold half of the display models!
The store failed to charge a premium for the assembled bike. Evidently, it was their attempt at keeping me away from customers.


During summer school in my teens, I put together a ratty-looking Varsity with a cheap sew-up front wheel.
Probably dropped the weight by three pounds! And enabled me to pop wheelies.
Even with a paper-thin cable lockset, nobody dared steal that sucker. (In all honesty, my brother stole that bike for me.)
No doubt, would-be thieves took one look at the front tubular and thought there's no way they would ever ride sewups.

Wonderful thread. Let us know if you need any components. I could probably part with bottom bracket or headset or bars.
I actually worked for Y.L.C.E. we were sent to stores to build and got paid on a per bike basis. Trueing huffy wheels was a trip. The best model did have aluminum rims and was actually much easier. We built the whole line of any store we went in. Great thing about the job was a lot of park tools.
52telecaster is offline  
Old 02-21-23, 12:09 AM
  #70  
Banned.
 
Drillium Dude's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: PAZ
Posts: 12,394
Mentioned: 255 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2586 Post(s)
Liked 4,819 Times in 1,709 Posts
Originally Posted by thumpism

It would be an interesting exercise to complete this build and begin another using a high quality frameset built up with low end (steel) components to see if there any validity to the speculation as to what makes the greatest difference ridewise.
One wouldn't even have to go as far as doing an entire component-swap - just swap out the heavy wheelset with a light one; reducing rotational weight will result in the most obvious difference in ride and/or feel.

Of course, given the subject thread, where's the fun in that? Swap away - and report back with your findings

DD
Drillium Dude is offline  
Old 02-21-23, 12:10 AM
  #71  
Senior Member
 
Andy_K's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Beaverton, OR
Posts: 14,714

Bikes: Yes

Mentioned: 513 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3172 Post(s)
Liked 3,677 Times in 1,382 Posts
Originally Posted by AdventureManCO
Bada bing, bada boom! 26" Huffy w/ 700c wheels -



Pah-lennnty of room to spare.
I put some 700c wheels in the frame last night to see how it would work. I'm not sure where I got the idea that this would have had 26x1-3/8" wheels, but I surely must have been wrong because now I'm wondering if I have a brake with long enough reach for the front. I should have taken a picture, but I didn't. Anyway, yeah, definitely not going to have a tire clearance problem.
__________________
My Bikes
Andy_K is offline  
Likes For Andy_K:
Old 02-21-23, 03:33 AM
  #72  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2021
Location: SW Florida, USA
Posts: 1,247

Bikes: Yes

Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 522 Post(s)
Liked 639 Times in 441 Posts
Originally Posted by AdventureManCO
@ehcoplex mentioned earlier in this thread that he wanted it to be a Santa Fe. I started researching that bike, and most of what I found were the smaller-wheeled renditions (24"? 26"?) but then I did see that they did make a 27" wheeled size, they just don't look to be as common.

If I find one, I'll get it, just because it could be the start of something else beautiful
Rohloff, maybe?
Hondo6 is offline  
Old 02-21-23, 03:51 AM
  #73  
Senior Member
 
P!N20's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Wurundjeri Country
Posts: 2,354
Mentioned: 32 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1026 Post(s)
Liked 1,762 Times in 863 Posts
Originally Posted by MooneyBloke
Ah! Nice picture of the good old 7-11 Serot^H^H^H^H^HHuffy. 😉
Serotta? I thought it was built by John Slawta of Land Shark?
P!N20 is offline  
Old 02-21-23, 04:14 AM
  #74  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2021
Location: SW Florida, USA
Posts: 1,247

Bikes: Yes

Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 522 Post(s)
Liked 639 Times in 441 Posts
Originally Posted by AdventureManCO
I'll have to look up 'Huffy Throw', never heard about that before.
AKA "Huffy toss".

https://coachlevi.com/mountain-bikin...in-huffy-toss/

Hondo6 is offline  
Likes For Hondo6:
Old 02-21-23, 04:40 AM
  #75  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2021
Location: SW Florida, USA
Posts: 1,247

Bikes: Yes

Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 522 Post(s)
Liked 639 Times in 441 Posts
Originally Posted by P!N20
Serotta? I thought it was built by John Slawta of Land Shark?
You are correct. According to this Cycling News article, Hampsten switched to a custom frame by Slawta after his team issued frame had broken earlier that season. The team issued Huffy-branded frames were apparently made by Serotta.

Also according to the same article, the reason for the failures (Hampsten wasn't the only one to experience frame trouble as I recall) with the team issued frames was ultimately traced to "an errant shipment by the builder's tubing supplier".

Last edited by Hondo6; 02-21-23 at 04:43 AM.
Hondo6 is offline  
Likes For Hondo6:

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell or Share My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2023 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.