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Huffy + Campagnolo Super Record = The Ultimate C&V Sacrilege build

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Huffy + Campagnolo Super Record = The Ultimate C&V Sacrilege build

Old 12-04-23, 03:56 PM
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Dave,
remember when I said rough life?? I had to yank the rear NDS out about an inch to get the frame straight again. It has held even after an oven treatment. But there is this one little hidden thing that reaffirms my belief that it will never get any better than just another rider quality bike. And I'm sure there are a few folks gasping at what I just said. But here is the evidence:

There is this dent on the non drive side of the seat tube. it can be easily seen on both the outside and inside of the seat tube. But with the seat tube installed upside down, you would need something on the order of a hydraulic tube bending tool to push the dent out. There is not enough room to get a mandrel inside the tube from the bottom bracket. So for now the dent is gonna stay.

But other than that this "Old Nago" is ready to get into a shipping box and find a new home. It has taken up almost a week of time here in the shop cleaning getting coated, thread chasing, and seat pillar polishing. So this one is now ready for a new home.

All dressed up and ready to travel. Small parts and bottle cage still need to fit in a small box for the trip.

Smiles, MH
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Old 12-07-23, 08:07 PM
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Huffy bicycle is memorable enough for me… going downhill on it and picking up some speed (probably no higher than 40 MPH) gave me sensation of not just going straight down the road but lurching around as the frame perceptibly flexed. Soon after this ~70 mile ride, the bike was donated with full disclosure - ride at your own risk! This was around 1982 or 1983. The only other memorable thing about it was that it was cheap, something I could afford.

Putting Campy record or super record on a huffy - this ought to be against some law! 😉
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Old 12-08-23, 06:54 PM
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Why won't this thread just die? Why can't we only talk about Columbus/Reynolds-equipped bikes? Why must this fine, upstanding forum be littered with the seemingly endless injustices found in the wretched discussions of sub-par bicycles being enjoyed? This is why we can't have nice things!



On a separate note,

Originally Posted by Alan K
Huffy bicycle is memorable enough for me… going downhill on it and picking up some speed (probably no higher than 40 MPH) gave me sensation of not just going straight down the road but lurching around as the frame perceptibly flexed. Soon after this ~70 mile ride, the bike was donated with full disclosure - ride at your own risk! This was around 1982 or 1983. The only other memorable thing about it was that it was cheap, something I could afford.

Putting Campy record or super record on a huffy - this ought to be against some law! 😉
If only it was against the law...maybe loonies would stop w/ ridiculous projects like this. Then again, perhaps 'rules were meant to be broken' would apply and provide additional inspiration.
@cudak888 also made a mention somewhere in past BSO mud-slinging that he found some gaspipe bike (maybe it was a Huffy) to be overall a good rider, but a bit whippy as well. In riding the Huffy in excess of 20-25mph down muddy fire road hills in the freezing rain, I didn't particularly notice any whippiness/flex with the Huffy frame, but then again I don't have a reputation for the finer, more refined discernments of the vintage cycling world

So much of what people hate about these bikes is really just the heavy, junky components. Probably the funniest thing I read about old Huffys is when people ditch the frame and keep the components. Now that's opposite world lol. The frames are pretty comparable to your Peugeot UO8 or Raleigh Super Course...only with better brazing lol. People upgrade those bikes all the time. People will return to a long-long childhood memory, for nostalgia's sake, or something else, and have quite an enjoyable time with it all. This is also a frequent experience w/ your 1970s-80s Huffy bikes as well, as many people started w/ these bikes. Perhaps because of peer pressure, or fear of being in the out-group, folks will drop their associations w/ these bikes, even if they secretly carry a soft place in their hearts for them, as these bikes carry a stigma. But I didn't even grow up w/ these bikes and find them beyond fun. But that is part of my twisted personality - I like going against the grain. People are too quick to be a follower or to care what others think. You wanna be a rebel? Ride a Huffy. The ride can be fantastic, you have no excuses (except for wanting to avoid mega pain and frustration). You know a word that I haven't heard used in a long time in public discourse? 'Non-conformist'. The algorithm, along with the wave of public perception and herd mentality has dictated that these bikes will continue to drift into obscurity (and dumpsters) but there are a few that are still willing to trod their own path. The path of the Huffy.

There will be more to come, more than can be imagined, but only after this ridiculous, horrific thread dies.
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Old 12-08-23, 07:11 PM
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Originally Posted by AdventureManCO
Why won't this thread just die? Why can't we only talk about Columbus/Reynolds-equipped bikes? Why must this fine, upstanding forum be littered with the seemingly endless injustices found in the wretched discussions of sub-par bicycles being enjoyed? This is why we can't have nice things!



On a separate note,



If only it was against the law...maybe loonies would stop w/ ridiculous projects like this. Then again, perhaps 'rules were meant to be broken' would apply and provide additional inspiration.
@cudak888 also made a mention somewhere in past BSO mud-slinging that he found some gaspipe bike (maybe it was a Huffy) to be overall a good rider, but a bit whippy as well. In riding the Huffy in excess of 20-25mph down muddy fire road hills in the freezing rain, I didn't particularly notice any whippiness/flex with the Huffy frame, but then again I don't have a reputation for the finer, more refined discernments of the vintage cycling world

So much of what people hate about these bikes is really just the heavy, junky components. The frames are pretty comparable to your Peugeot UO8 or Raleigh Super Course...only with better brazing lol. People upgrade those bikes all the time. People will return to a long-long childhood memory, for nostalgia's sake, or something else, and have quite an enjoyable time with it all. This is also a frequent experience w/ your 1970s-80s Huffy bikes as well, as many people started w/ these bikes. Perhaps because of peer pressure, or fear of being in the out-group, folks will drop their associations w/ these bikes, even if they secretly carry a soft place in their hearts for them, as these bikes carry a stigma. But I didn't even grow up w/ these bikes and find them beyond fun. But that is part of my twisted personality - I like going against the grain. People are too quick to be a follower or to care what others think. You wanna be a rebel? Ride a Huffy. The ride can be fantastic, you have no excuses (except for wanting to avoid mega pain and frustration). You know a word that I haven't heard used in a long time in public discourse? 'Non-conformist'. The algorithm, along with the wave of public perception and herd mentality has dictated that these bikes will continue to drift into obscurity (and dumpsters) but there are a few that are willing to trod their own path. The path of the Huffy.

There will be more to come, more than can be imagined, but only after this ridiculous, horrific thread dies.
You are definitely contributing towards a speedy demise of this thread. 😉👌
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Old 12-08-23, 08:56 PM
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The thread was alas, supposed to only last to 2000 posts, which was a stretch in terms of forum thread lengths. But there were plenty of members who participated and thought the endless drivel would get to 2000 posts as just a bit of fun. However I have participated and even joined in the fun by sending a high value Guerciotti to AdventureManCO for testing against the Huffy for a one on one comparison. Which by the way is likely going to be a good comparison of the time tested Italian frames against the mass produced American frames.
I have experience with both from a design perspective as I spent close to 10 years as a mechanical steward for the Little 500 bike race that used AMF bikes made in southern Illinois similar to the Huffy. I spent time in the production factory seeing the production methods and geometry being aware that over 300 riders would be on the bikes I OK'ed from the AMF factory. Safety was paramount for us with the bikes, but ride-ability also was important. They had to endure a 50 mile race and not hurt any rider because of frame geometry or production methods.
My experience made me believe that Huffy quality would stand up to what AMCO did with his bike for a quite grueling ride in cold temperatures. The real test will be against the Guerciotti in a one on one ride for maybe 25 Colorado miles. That is my opinion and I will stand by it.
Now I have also offered up for a contender, a Colnago, but I quietly suspect the Guerciotti is going to be the best contender to test the Huffy's ride and quality. Talk about sacrilege! What would happen if the Huffy stood up the "Old Nago" as just as good a ride. Smiles, MH

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Old 12-08-23, 09:00 PM
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Originally Posted by AdventureManCO
Why won't this thread just die?
( floodlights on AMCO, voice thru tinny distorted PA) ON THE GROUND! KEEP YOUR HANDS WHERE WE CAN SEE THEM!

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Old 12-08-23, 11:21 PM
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Originally Posted by AdventureManCO
Why won't this thread just die? Why can't we only talk about Columbus/Reynolds-equipped bikes? Why must this fine, upstanding forum be littered with the seemingly endless injustices found in the wretched discussions of sub-par bicycles being enjoyed? This is why we can't have nice things!



On a separate note,



If only it was against the law...maybe loonies would stop w/ ridiculous projects like this. Then again, perhaps 'rules were meant to be broken' would apply and provide additional inspiration.
@cudak888 also made a mention somewhere in past BSO mud-slinging that he found some gaspipe bike (maybe it was a Huffy) to be overall a good rider, but a bit whippy as well. In riding the Huffy in excess of 20-25mph down muddy fire road hills in the freezing rain, I didn't particularly notice any whippiness/flex with the Huffy frame, but then again I don't have a reputation for the finer, more refined discernments of the vintage cycling world

So much of what people hate about these bikes is really just the heavy, junky components. Probably the funniest thing I read about old Huffys is when people ditch the frame and keep the components. Now that's opposite world lol. The frames are pretty comparable to your Peugeot UO8 or Raleigh Super Course...only with better brazing lol. People upgrade those bikes all the time. People will return to a long-long childhood memory, for nostalgia's sake, or something else, and have quite an enjoyable time with it all. This is also a frequent experience w/ your 1970s-80s Huffy bikes as well, as many people started w/ these bikes. Perhaps because of peer pressure, or fear of being in the out-group, folks will drop their associations w/ these bikes, even if they secretly carry a soft place in their hearts for them, as these bikes carry a stigma. But I didn't even grow up w/ these bikes and find them beyond fun. But that is part of my twisted personality - I like going against the grain. People are too quick to be a follower or to care what others think. You wanna be a rebel? Ride a Huffy. The ride can be fantastic, you have no excuses (except for wanting to avoid mega pain and frustration). You know a word that I haven't heard used in a long time in public discourse? 'Non-conformist'. The algorithm, along with the wave of public perception and herd mentality has dictated that these bikes will continue to drift into obscurity (and dumpsters) but there are a few that are still willing to trod their own path. The path of the Huffy.

There will be more to come, more than can be imagined, but only after this ridiculous, horrific thread dies.
I know I would have a lot more to say if Huffy ever made a production bike large enough to fit me (or close). Even just a 25" frame, that would be great. In my vast non-existent knowledge of Huffy, I know of no such model or comparable frame size. Alas, I am confined, confined!, to discuss loftier wheeled subject matter.
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Old 12-09-23, 12:14 AM
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Originally Posted by RiddleOfSteel
I know I would have a lot more to say if Huffy ever made a production bike large enough to fit me (or close). Even just a 25" frame, that would be great. In my vast non-existent knowledge of Huffy, I know of no such model or comparable frame size. Alas, I am confined, confined!, to discuss loftier wheeled subject matter.
It must be rough for you But yeah, I've never seen an extra large frame Huffy. Not to say they never made one, or that there isn't one out there somewhere. From what I've seen, they have come in a 56/7cm size, and a 53/4cm size, generally. I guess they figured that would cover enough bases.

You know, you could always be like that one guy who chopped his Paramount up to shorten it, only do the opposite. Maybe even use a piece of donor tube from one of your Treks to make it more appealing to ride
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Old 12-09-23, 05:47 AM
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Originally Posted by AdventureManCO
It must be rough for you But yeah, I've never seen an extra large frame Huffy. Not to say they never made one, or that there isn't one out there somewhere. From what I've seen, they have come in a 56/7cm size, and a 53/4cm size, generally. I guess they figured that would cover enough bases.

You know, you could always be like that one guy who chopped his Paramount up to shorten it, only do the opposite. Maybe even use a piece of donor tube from one of your Treks to make it more appealing to ride
Probably were never meant to be purchased by rational adults...just transitional teens who were wanting something for their paper routes...hee hee.
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Old 12-09-23, 08:00 AM
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Originally Posted by AdventureManCO
@cudak888 also made a mention somewhere in past BSO mud-slinging that he found some gaspipe bike (maybe it was a Huffy) to be overall a good rider, but a bit whippy as well.
It was a Flea Spirit roadster, a singlespeed version of one of those Brittany 3-speeds.

It's pretty tough to make a lugged steel frame without any merit at all, if the geometry is right (that goes for the fork too) and the dropouts aren't made of cardboard and banana peels.

-Kurt
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Old 12-09-23, 11:34 AM
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Originally Posted by jdawginsc
Probably were never meant to be purchased by rational adults...just transitional teens who were wanting something for their paper routes...hee hee.

Key word being 'rational'
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Old 12-09-23, 11:36 AM
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Originally Posted by cudak888

tough to make a lugged steel frame without any merit at all

-Kurt
*checks Huffy for lugs*...


I see what you did there!
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Old 12-09-23, 06:51 PM
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Originally Posted by cudak888
It's pretty tough to make a lugged steel frame without any merit at all, if the geometry is right (that goes for the fork too) and the dropouts aren't made of cardboard and banana peels.

-Kurt
Ahem. Stamped and spot-welded cardboard and banana peels.
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Old 12-10-23, 01:45 AM
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Upon seeing the newcom Huffy/Gware-chee-oh-tee thread:



We ["Who is this we you speak of???"] cannot get this close to 2,000 posts and not cross that threshold! Too legit to quit, I say, dear Watson.

To that end, I can image there was a Grant Peterson ethos at play within Huffy during this period. How so? Never a race bike; slack, er, "relaxed" geometry for the everyman, only like two or so sizes because that's all humanity needs, low-en---er, I mean, modest yet satisfactorily-functional components. Bridgestone/Rivendell thinking at Walmart prices. I mean, how American in thinking is that? Bald Eagle-level, that's how much. Porsche 911 versus Corvette. Basket case vs. Bread Basket of the mother-biking world, am I right???
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Stumbled across the (1 page , 1 picture) "Show us your Confente" thread where I found this:


AdventureManCO
Always wanting to see more "Huffente" I see an amazing opportunity for a picture "recreation" challenge? 4 Auntie's and the Huffente?
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Old 01-22-24, 11:32 PM
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Originally Posted by RiddleOfSteel
Upon seeing the newcom Huffy/Gware-chee-oh-tee thread:
I have it on good word that that thread may have chafed the wool jerseys of more than a few people, who cannot believe that a Huffy of all things could ever compare to the likes of an (legit) Italian race bike. Well, I don't know if the Guerciotti was ever a race bike, but it was Guerciotti's highest offering at the time, and has the geometry chops for sure. I'm more than happy to agree with the source. The Huffente will never corner like that bike, or have that super cool light springy feeling to it, but there are some other areas where the Huffy makes up for at least part of that - it actually accelerates very well. You know how some bikes just feel like you are riding through sand? Most of the time it's the tires, but sometimes it's not. I can't stand it when a bike feels like 'riding through sand' and I never get that feeling with the Huffy. I cannot say the same for other bikes with a higher pedigree. And...this is all with the Huffente weighing more, having that goofy short stem, etc.

Right now the Huffente is going through a makeover. It will be getting a longer stem, and some upgraded components. Yes, yes, I hate to lose some of the Campy gear, but it will actually be great to cut some of the fat off the bike, and I can then use some of the Campy parts for the Trek 930 build, so it's a win-win. As long as I keep it mainly Campy, especially with the bits that matter, like the running gear, the headset, etc., I think we'll be in good shape. I have a spare Huffy fork that I am going to experiment with as far as reducing trail. While we cannot change the headtube angle, it may be possible to reduce the fork rake and I'd like to play with that a bit. There is enough meat on the forks if I need to file the dropouts a bit lower to keep a completely horizontal top tube, since straightening the fork will potentially raise the front up just a bit.


Its a good thing I had a spare set of Campy cranks laying around (in reality, they were for the Trek), because this is what I found on the Huffente when playing around with BBs and chainlines the other day:













I'm actually excited to get these on it, because they are 170mm and the bike previously had 165mm cranks. I don't know if I'll be able to salvage the 165s...we'll have to see.


The ethos of the Huffy...hmm. It is a philosophical undertaking! Well, I can tell you it started off a lot more mundane. Sort of just 'I wonder if the bike will still suck'...and instead, it sucked me in with it's boat-anchor-like charm. Apart from the brakes, it rode fine in stock form. Heavy yes, but smooth. I still can't forget how funny the brakes were when trying to stop. I can still hear them scream lol. Fully capable of delivering someone all over for probably a long time. I would estimate that more of these bikes have been thrown away than have been broken. Even better now, and much better than anyone else possibly thinks. Don't believe me? Look at all the bikes I'm giving away to clear out the LeGrande Garage, and none of them are the Huffy. I was just like everyone else, i.e 'Huffy's are garbage' etc etc., but there is a lot more color to that spectrum than simply black and white. In stock form there is much to be desired, for sure. But experiencing something different now, I quite enjoy showing up w/ this thing where you would NEVER find one, ever. People just don't know how much fun it is.

I will, however, need to put more miles on the bike. The bike did get 100 miles in stock form (over multiple trips), a grueling 34mi ride on rough and rocky roads in horrible weather, but I've never taken it on a 50, 60 or 100mi ride. That will be my goal this year, hopefully multiple times. The bike will need to prove itself if I expect to use it at Cino. How are those stamped dropouts and squished stays going to hold up? Well, I can think of some great and ROCKY mountain bike single track trails to take it on (nothing w/ huge drops) and can fully put it to the test.

LOTS more planned with the Huffente. And maybe even a few of its cousins.

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Old 01-22-24, 11:43 PM
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Originally Posted by SoCaled
Always wanting to see more "Huffente" I see an amazing opportunity for a picture "recreation" challenge? 4 Auntie's and the Huffente?

Ha! Lots of potential here!

Right now, the Huffente is in a bit of a sad way:






Cracked cranks, flat tubular (freakin' goathead)...bike is a bit under the weather.

Not to worry though, I'm taking the opportunity to finally start changing some things around and level up the bike...


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Old 01-23-24, 12:17 AM
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No worries, the Huffente is in good hands.

I do question the motivation of reducing the fork rake, which will increase trail, making the steering yet more resistant to the rider's effecting any changes in direction.


I continue to be blown away by this thread.

So many interpretations, like visiting an art gallery!

Somehow, amidst my recent four months working 600 miles away in Portland, I missed so much here.

Yep, while having only a mildly fussed-over department-store "dually" to ride around on up there, I missed the post that jumped the big shark, where someone was charged with "cultural appropriation" for putting Super Record parts on a Huffy and then actually riding it.

But it was an interesting post that challenged my ability to understand it.

The cultural divide is one thing, and ethnic divides seem to constantly re-surface in what passes for "news" these days, but the spectrum of economic divide is the real, big deal, no doubt.
Had me wondering what E-zine that Mr. 88 writes for on a normal day.

Having lived in neighborhoods right there with the projects in two cities, and having applied conspicuous effort to fixing up low-end bikes over the years, there was at least something to that thread that resonated. But what?

I think it's the conspicuous consumption angle. Where I might be thought of locally as being at least "thrifty" for using cheap-cast-off bikes for spirited, semi-competitive riding, even racing, there is hidden behind that a great deal of time resources that is expended, which for many is a resource in short supply along with all of the others. It's not just how modern/light/exotic that the bike is, but having the available time/workshop resources to keep vintage wheels turning in anger seems as much of a first-world luxury as throwing down perhaps a few grand for a modern steed.
That, and having time to participate here I should add!
While enjoying the real luxury of stockpiled Dollar Tree wine no less.

I don't feel like I'm contributing much to gentrification, if perhaps only because I don't live in a big city (a small one, semi-rural to be exact).
And I don't know whose culture I might be appropriating, since I never saw any people doing the road- or gravel-bike thing in my neighborhoods of Bridgeport or Raleigh (though I did in the Bronx when I worked there Circa 1980). I sure didn't see vintage-restoration as much of those area's culture either, nor the "polishing of turd" as applied to box-store bikes.

So I guess 88's post was some kind of a joke (I hope so, and I get it).
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Old 01-23-24, 12:42 AM
  #1894  
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Originally Posted by dddd
No worries, the Huffente is in good hands.

I do question the motivation of reducing the fork rake, which will increase trail, making the steering yet more resistant to the rider's effecting any changes in direction.


I continue to be blown away by this thread.

So many interpretations, like visiting an art gallery!

Somehow, amidst my recent four months working 600 miles away in Portland, I missed so much here.

Yep, while having only a mildly fussed-over department-store "dually" to ride around on up there, I missed the post that jumped the big shark, where someone was charged with "cultural appropriation" for putting Super Record parts on a Huffy and then actually riding it.

But it was an interesting post that challenged my ability to understand it.

The cultural divide is one thing, and ethnic divides seem to constantly re-surface in what passes for "news" these days, but the spectrum of economic divide is the real, big deal, no doubt.
Had me wondering what E-zine that Mr. 88 writes for on a normal day.

Having lived in neighborhoods right there with the projects in two cities, and having applied conspicuous effort to fixing up low-end bikes over the years, there was at least something to that thread that resonated. But what?

I think it's the conspicuous consumption angle. Where I might be thought of locally as being at least "thrifty" for using cheap-cast-off bikes for spirited, semi-competitive riding, even racing, there is hidden behind that a great deal of time resources that is expended, which for many is a resource in short supply along with all of the others. It's not just how modern/light/exotic that the bike is, but having the available time/workshop resources to keep vintage wheels turning in anger seems as much of a first-world luxury as throwing down perhaps a few grand for a modern steed.
That, and having time to participate here I should add!
While enjoying the real luxury of stockpiled Dollar Tree wine no less.

I don't feel like I'm contributing much to gentrification, if perhaps only because I don't live in a big city (a small one, semi-rural to be exact).
And I don't know whose culture I might be appropriating, since I never saw any people doing the road- or gravel-bike thing in my neighborhoods of Bridgeport or Raleigh (though I did in the Bronx when I worked there Circa 1980). I sure didn't see vintage-restoration as much of those area's culture either, nor the "polishing of turd" as applied to box-store bikes.

So I guess 88's post was some kind of a joke (I hope so, and I get it).

I see what you mean by increasing the trail. It took me a sec, but I looked at a picture and everything made sense. My only question would be if decreasing rake made steering more resistive (via increasing trail), why do more racier bikes have less fork rake? I'm talking a bit sideways as I have no great understanding of geometry.

Yes, you missed a bit there! I wouldn't worry too much about any of those other posts, it was great performance art and I was decently impressed!

Regarding appropriation and all that, most of it is just appreciation misunderstood by angry people. I used to work in an industry where people were worried about all of that stuff all the time. To be frank, most of the concern was about appearances. Used as a tool to out-do or one up someone. I have found that a more genuine sincerity tends to take other forms than any I had ever found these sort of accusations.

The funniest thing about that whole post, which I never mentioned, was that I was that kid that grew up with a little Huffy bmx (that eventually broke from going off too many curbs). Besides, I never see anyone, let alone anyone in poverty, riding Huffys anymore, especially vintage road bikes of any sort. The two I saw today were actually on really nice bikes. But most of the time it is on Lime bikes, electric scooters, or Next/Pacific bikes.
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Old 01-23-24, 12:46 AM
  #1895  
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Originally Posted by AdventureManCO
Ha! Lots of potential here!


Right now, the Huffente is in a bit of a sad way: Cracked cranks, flat tubular (freakin' goathead)...bike is a bit under the weather.


Not to worry though, I'm taking the opportunity to finally start changing some things around and level up the bike...

Ah, the old cracked high-end vintage crank. I've dealt with these in the past, and just had a late-'90s Specialized triple crankset succumb to this fate. If you have a set of fine/small/jeweler's files, that would be my first act. @Dfrost has lent me his and told me how to repair them. The crack, in my experience, doesn't usually go that deep (well, if caught early enough), but you carefully file until you can't see it--both "sides" of the crack (underside, topside). The way those cranks are cast and/or machined, the sharp edge, while nice looking, is a stress riser, which causes the cracks when repeated pedaling force is applied. So, in addition to filing away the cracks, file a radius along that edge as well to reduce the stress rise situation. You can carefully sand out any roughness if you wish.


On my recent Specialized crankset, I didn't have any jeweler's files, so I went at it with a slender fine grinding/smoothing bit on the Dremel. Not advised for the finish quality, but it took down what it needed to when I was out of luck and I was able to mitigate the ugliness with some fine grit sand paper. For a second there, the cracks (both sides of the arm) looked quite concerning, but I believe I stopped the proverbial bleeding in time. It, an Octalink-BB-employing Sugino-forged unit, is mounted to my '83 560 with a Dura-Ace 7700 double BB, with a 3mm shim on the drive side. 28t small ring a whisker off the chain stay and a sub-149mm q-factor (super narrow for a triple, especially a modern one that doesn't work with square taper BBs). Somehow that ridiculous setup is perfectly operated by a Dura-Ace 7700 double front derailleur! The experimentation is no Huffente, but it is halfway certifiable IMO.
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Old 01-23-24, 01:22 AM
  #1896  
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Originally Posted by AdventureManCO
I see what you mean by increasing the trail. It took me a sec, but I looked at a picture and everything made sense. My only question would be if decreasing rake made steering more resistive (via increasing trail), why do more racier bikes have less fork rake? I'm talking a bit sideways as I have no great understanding of geometry.
...
In the case of racing bikes, the headtube angle being much steeper, the straighter fork lending greater trail is needed, because the steep headtube reduces the trail.

The above two factors serve to shorten the wheelbase, specifically the front-center dimension (from the bb center to the front axle).

The shorter front-center helps riders draft more closely without overlapping wheels, and puts more weight on the front tire (aiding stability).
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Old 01-23-24, 10:28 AM
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Well, now that we have the cousins involved, I suspect it is time to forward along a couple of parts that will surely offend those delicate senses of mis-appropriation.

This is an original conversion unit (circa@1978 a BMX staple for conversions of Huffy's, Mongoose, SE racing, and all oft he other competition bikes) that surfaced while cleaning up the stash box.

And a newer conversion model from just last year.
These items should add to the beautification of the cousins as they fall victim to the machinations of AMCO. Smiles, MH
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Old 01-28-24, 05:20 PM
  #1898  
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While we all know this thread needs to die, a not-so-secret part of me still hopes, prays, and wishes (every night before I go to bed) that this thread will make it to 2000 posts.

Therefore, I don’t feel too bad about shamelessly bringing this nonsense back up to the top.

Today, an unexpected package arrived. While it did have a return address label, one was not needed, for I knew who it was from, a member of extremely high standing who only associates with the finest C&V ideals, who out of his own generosity decided to contribute to some future top-tier, best-of-the-best ‘top 1%’ grade of builds…






As it turns out, Dave may be clued in to some future plans of the LeGrande garage, plans that will have most of you wailing in agony, gouging out eyeballs and pulling out hair, and I’ll be right there next to you, doing the same thing and somehow masochistically enjoying every moment of it.






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Old 01-28-24, 09:57 PM
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AMCO,
Since Bianchigirll asked about the adaptors I figure this was the perfect time to throw a little diesel fuel on the fire. And even though I have spent zero time shopping for for pig lipstick, like jdawginsc does in the nail polish aisle, I took this opportunity to demonstrate what we are talking about when converting Huffys to a three piece crank. I am looking forward to the lightening of the Huffiente to another race quality bike. Smiles, MH
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Old 01-29-24, 08:18 AM
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Originally Posted by Mad Honk
AMCO,
Since Bianchigirll asked about the adaptors I figure this was the perfect time to throw a little diesel fuel on the fire. And even though I have spent zero time shopping for for pig lipstick, like jdawginsc does in the nail polish aisle, I took this opportunity to demonstrate what we are talking about when converting Huffys to a three piece crank. I am looking forward to the lightening of the Huffiente to another race quality bike. Smiles, MH
For the record, nail polish as touch up rather than nails.

I order my other nail polish online...
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