Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Classic & Vintage
Reload this Page >

What would you rather have?

Notices
Classic & Vintage This forum is to discuss the many aspects of classic and vintage bicycles, including musclebikes, lightweights, middleweights, hi-wheelers, bone-shakers, safety bikes and much more.
View Poll Results: Which would you rather have?
1957 Cinelli SC
36
49.32%
1977 Cinelli SC
37
50.68%
Voters: 73. You may not vote on this poll

What would you rather have?

Old 03-23-23, 10:10 PM
  #26  
Classtime 
Senior Member
 
Classtime's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 4,072

Bikes: 82 Medici, 2011 Richard Sachs, 2011 Milwaukee Road

Mentioned: 48 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1626 Post(s)
Liked 1,375 Times in 812 Posts
‘57 before support is provided on TDF and I could look cool with tubulars over my shoulders.
__________________
I don't do: disks, tubeless, e-shifting, or bead head nymphs.
Classtime is offline  
Old 03-23-23, 11:22 PM
  #27  
bikingshearer 
Crawlin' up, flyin' down
 
bikingshearer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Democratic Peoples' Republic of Berkeley
Posts: 4,983

Bikes: 1967 Paramount; 1982-ish Ron Cooper; 1978 Eisentraut "A"; two mid-1960s Cinelli Speciale Corsas; and others in various stages of non-rideability.

Mentioned: 24 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 672 Post(s)
Liked 1,292 Times in 614 Posts
I'd think pretty hard and then choose the '57 because because of the 1950s version of "racing geometry," so it has longer chain stays, longer wheelbase and slightly slacker angles than the shorter, more upright geometry of the 1970s. It would probably be a flatland-only bike; there is no way a Campy Gran Sport derailleurs and a Magistroni crank will give me the kind of gearing I need to get my carcass up the hills around here, but it would cool as hell for shortish rides to a coffee shop. If ithe Universal Extra brakes are the center-pulls that are similar t the later 61s, they would be okay. If they were the sidepulls (and therefore Univerrsal 51sm which will stop you in a week and a half), I would find a way to make Mafacs fit on it instead, which might be a challenge thanks to that weird Italian fixation of the period with short-reach front brakes and long-reach rear brakes.

I'll be interested to see why iab is asking.
__________________
"I'm in shape -- round is a shape." Andy Rooney
bikingshearer is offline  
Likes For bikingshearer:
Old 03-23-23, 11:42 PM
  #28  
bikingshearer 
Crawlin' up, flyin' down
 
bikingshearer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Democratic Peoples' Republic of Berkeley
Posts: 4,983

Bikes: 1967 Paramount; 1982-ish Ron Cooper; 1978 Eisentraut "A"; two mid-1960s Cinelli Speciale Corsas; and others in various stages of non-rideability.

Mentioned: 24 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 672 Post(s)
Liked 1,292 Times in 614 Posts
Originally Posted by 79pmooney View Post
'77. Easy choice. I'm looking for a classic European race bike to hang some brakes on. Brakes that could be from that very year. (Yes, Italian bike lovers would cringe that they are far lesser French brakes but I think those French cheapos won the Tour on a Peugeot that year.)

Besides, 1977 was the heyday of my racing. And I trained with a woman who rode an Italian Masi.(Just wikipedia'd '77. Van Impe, Merckx and Zoetemelk all had a bad luck late and Bernard Thevenet won riding I presume those brakes.)
I just checked the Kennedy Bros. 1977 TdF book (great photos, impenetrable writing, like most of the Kennedy Bros offerings of the era). Thevenet's bike had MAFAC 2000 brakes, basically Competitions with wheel guides and a smoother gold-anodized finish.

Here's a set of 2000s.


And here's a set of Competitions. (Ignore the arrow; that was for a several year old question that has long since been answered.)
__________________
"I'm in shape -- round is a shape." Andy Rooney
bikingshearer is offline  
Likes For bikingshearer:
Old 03-24-23, 01:12 AM
  #29  
RustyJames 
Senior Member
 
RustyJames's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2021
Location: Beaverton, OR
Posts: 1,210

Bikes: You had me at rusty and Italian!!

Mentioned: 25 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 479 Post(s)
Liked 740 Times in 419 Posts
57 all day. A 77 would ride like a nice bike but the 57 would be a unique experience unlike what you would get in a more modern bike.

Im basically in-line with obrentharris
RustyJames is offline  
Likes For RustyJames:
Old 03-24-23, 01:54 AM
  #30  
merziac
Senior Member
 
merziac's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: PDX
Posts: 12,459

Bikes: Merz x 5 + Specialized Merz Allez x 2, Strawberry/Newlands/DiNucci/Ti x3, Gordon, Fuso/Moulton x2, Bornstein, Paisley,1958-74 Paramounts x3, 3rensho, 74 Moto TC, 73-78 Raleigh Pro's x5, Marinoni x2, 1960 Cinelli SC, 1980 Bianchi SC, PX-10 X 2

Mentioned: 245 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3920 Post(s)
Liked 4,842 Times in 2,842 Posts
Originally Posted by bikingshearer View Post
I just checked the Kennedy Bros. 1977 TdF book (great photos, impenetrable writing, like most of the Kennedy Bros offerings of the era). Thevenet's bike had MAFAC 2000 brakes, basically Competitions with wheel guides and a smoother gold-anodized finish.

Here's a set of 2000s.


And here's a set of Competitions. (Ignore the arrow; that was for a several year old question that has long since been answered.)
The 2000's are far nicer than the Comps, the arms are thicker, rounded, stronger, with a more refined finish.

These in silver were my first brake upgrade purchase, very nice and fantastic performance.
merziac is online now  
Old 03-24-23, 01:56 AM
  #31  
Millstone
Full Member
 
Millstone's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Location: Arnhem NL
Posts: 209

Bikes: Peugeot PR60 1977, Fuji Sportif 2.3 2019, Duell Professional SLX 1992

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 72 Post(s)
Liked 60 Times in 53 Posts
'57 because older hence more special.

I mean, if you are going to spend that much, make it something really unique. I doubt that there are a lot of good bikes left from that era.
1977 is still doable.

Provided that you know what you are getting into I guess (I think you do).
Maintenance might be more difficult for the older bike? I dont know. Something to consider perhaps.

So 1957! And we need pictures somewhere along in this thread.
Millstone is offline  
Old 03-24-23, 03:21 AM
  #32  
CliffordK
Senior Member
 
CliffordK's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: Eugene, Oregon, USA
Posts: 27,518
Mentioned: 217 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 17497 Post(s)
Liked 4,126 Times in 3,068 Posts
For me it is a tossup. The answer would depend on one's goals.

I'd likely choose the '77 as a bike that I could just hop on and ride.

Yet, there is also some attraction to the older more rare vintage frames.
CliffordK is online now  
Old 03-24-23, 04:34 AM
  #33  
smontanaro 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Evanston, IL
Posts: 5,477

Bikes: many

Mentioned: 60 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1264 Post(s)
Liked 1,059 Times in 588 Posts
Originally Posted by iab View Post
Which do you choose?
1957. Much less pedestrian build. And I already have a bike with first gen SR bits.
__________________
Contact me about helping Doug Fattic's Ukraine Bicycle Project


smontanaro is offline  
Old 03-24-23, 06:02 AM
  #34  
smd4
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2020
Location: Wake Forest, NC
Posts: 3,457

Bikes: 1989 Cinelli Supercorsa

Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2072 Post(s)
Liked 1,687 Times in 1,029 Posts
'77 for me. Better geometry and probably better tubing.
smd4 is offline  
Old 03-24-23, 07:33 AM
  #35  
USAZorro
Seor Member
 
USAZorro's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Hardy, VA
Posts: 17,573

Bikes: Mostly English - predominantly Raleighs

Mentioned: 64 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1326 Post(s)
Liked 785 Times in 479 Posts
1957.

1. Much rarer
2. Magistroni cranks are art
3. I already have 16 examples of 1970s bicycles. I have one that I think is from 1950s.
4. I prefer riding a slightly more relaxed geometry
__________________
In search of what to search for.
USAZorro is offline  
Likes For USAZorro:
Old 03-24-23, 08:45 AM
  #36  
gugie 
Bike Butcher of Portland
 
gugie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 11,204

Bikes: It's complicated.

Mentioned: 1242 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4412 Post(s)
Liked 4,756 Times in 1,976 Posts
57.

Geometry is more suited for a 650b conversion.
__________________
If someone tells you that you have enough bicycles and you don't need any more, stop talking to them. You don't need that kind of negativity in your life.
gugie is offline  
Likes For gugie:
Old 03-24-23, 09:18 AM
  #37  
Kabuki12
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Posts: 2,756
Mentioned: 30 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 659 Post(s)
Liked 1,561 Times in 902 Posts
I would be humble enough to have either, but if I COULD choose, it would be the 1957 for historical value....and coolness. I have a few bikes from the seventies that are racy enough for that sort of riding. The '57 would give a different riding experience, even though I prefer a tighter geometry. Something about riding around on a bike with that kind of history knowing that this was as good as it got in 1957. When I had my 1957 Porsche , any decent Honda car could leave me in the dust , but the cool factor was off the charts!
Kabuki12 is offline  
Old 03-24-23, 11:21 AM
  #38  
SurferRosa
seor miembro
 
SurferRosa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2018
Location: Pac NW
Posts: 7,321

Bikes: Old school lightweights

Mentioned: 83 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3145 Post(s)
Liked 4,690 Times in 2,446 Posts
Originally Posted by bikingshearer View Post
I'll be interested to see why iab is asking.
Based on two replies to my posts in the "Vintage vs Modern Video" thread posted right before this one, I'm guessing he expected a far more lopsided vote:

Originally Posted by iab View Post
Here's the thing, C&Vers will scoff at modern tech, because what they rode in their youth is perfectly fine. But those exact same C&Vers will scoff at tech older than their youth, considering them as wall hangers.
Originally Posted by iab View Post
Not even close. A 1978 Cinelli equipped with Super Record versus a 1958 Cinelli equipped with Gran Sport. The 78 is "awesome." You can't ride the 58; it is a wall hanger.
​​​​​​​
SurferRosa is offline  
Likes For SurferRosa:
Old 03-24-23, 03:00 PM
  #39  
iab
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
iab's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: NW Burbs, Chicago
Posts: 11,724
Mentioned: 191 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2755 Post(s)
Liked 2,887 Times in 1,150 Posts
Since SurferRosa was entirely a tool, I bet you stood in line telling everyone Darth Vader is Luke's father, I'll come clean.

C&V frequently gets a, let's bash modern stuff, thread. No need for clicky-e-gears, batteries suck, real men take their hands off the bars, steel is real, and so on. My hypnosis is people are comfortable with the tech they know. So while 1977 tech is fully known by C&V because that was their youth, hell yes, they would ride that bike. Go back 20 years, that stuff isn't well known and less desirable. Poll results confirm and while the written replies skew 1957, it seems those would have the 57 as a wall hanger than a ridden bike like the 77. So for me, it is no surprise why most regular people don't drink the C&V Kool-Aid, and neither do the people of C&V.

So new question, why is the 57 a wall hanger and the 77 a rider?
iab is offline  
Old 03-24-23, 03:28 PM
  #40  
merziac
Senior Member
 
merziac's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: PDX
Posts: 12,459

Bikes: Merz x 5 + Specialized Merz Allez x 2, Strawberry/Newlands/DiNucci/Ti x3, Gordon, Fuso/Moulton x2, Bornstein, Paisley,1958-74 Paramounts x3, 3rensho, 74 Moto TC, 73-78 Raleigh Pro's x5, Marinoni x2, 1960 Cinelli SC, 1980 Bianchi SC, PX-10 X 2

Mentioned: 245 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3920 Post(s)
Liked 4,842 Times in 2,842 Posts
Originally Posted by iab View Post
Since SurferRosa was entirely a tool, I bet you stood in line telling everyone Darth Vader is Luke's father, I'll come clean.

C&V frequently gets a, let's bash modern stuff, thread. No need for clicky-e-gears, batteries suck, real men take their hands off the bars, steel is real, and so on. My hypnosis is people are comfortable with the tech they know. So while 1977 tech is fully known by C&V because that was their youth, hell yes, they would ride that bike. Go back 20 years, that stuff isn't well known and less desirable. Poll results confirm and while the written replies skew 1957, it seems those would have the 57 as a wall hanger than a ridden bike like the 77. So for me, it is no surprise why most regular people don't drink the C&V Kool-Aid, and neither do the people of C&V.

So new question, why is the 57 a wall hanger and the 77 a rider?
No real disagreement, but you are an outlier here IMO, a good thing to be sure.

Very few here are even remotely adept, let alone good enough at this to have a 57 that could be a regular rider as you.

I'm too lazy and fussy to wrangle such a thing when i can hardly keep myself motivated to ride my daily driver that is set up and ready to go all the time.

I do lament my 58 Paramount sitting all the time just to look at and have many others as well.

the one thing they still do is keep my juices flowing so that I try to keep up and track mentally.

I have a early 60's SC frame that I have entertained building up semi modern for a rider but like the Paramount it is a bit small so....

Too lazy, too many excuses and not enough easy motivation.

Still pick the 57 all day long and yes would tell myself I would try to ride it but....

Always glad you're here and that you posed this to us.


Last edited by merziac; 03-24-23 at 03:32 PM.
merziac is online now  
Old 03-24-23, 03:29 PM
  #41  
alexihnen 
Senior Member
 
alexihnen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2019
Location: Cincinnati, OH
Posts: 695
Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 181 Post(s)
Liked 423 Times in 184 Posts
Originally Posted by seagrade View Post
Id choose the 1977. Bicycles are made for riding and Id find the 77 more rideable and serviceable and hence ride it more.
I think this may be the reason for many. It's familiar, it's "iconic", the components "look" right. Most of what I collect and ride are 80s race bikes, some Dura-Ace 7400, some Campagnolo. To step back to the 70s was a leap for me, but still, everything is super familiar. To step back a generation before that means learning a bunch of new stuff and maybe buying some new tools.
alexihnen is offline  
Old 03-24-23, 03:37 PM
  #42  
SurferRosa
seor miembro
 
SurferRosa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2018
Location: Pac NW
Posts: 7,321

Bikes: Old school lightweights

Mentioned: 83 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3145 Post(s)
Liked 4,690 Times in 2,446 Posts
Originally Posted by iab View Post
Since SurferRosa was entirely a tool, I bet you stood in line telling everyone Darth Vader is Luke's father, I'll come clean.
No worries, and I expected as much. Others had already caught on without my assistance. (See post 8, for example.) Iggy list updated.
SurferRosa is offline  
Old 03-24-23, 03:44 PM
  #43  
merziac
Senior Member
 
merziac's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: PDX
Posts: 12,459

Bikes: Merz x 5 + Specialized Merz Allez x 2, Strawberry/Newlands/DiNucci/Ti x3, Gordon, Fuso/Moulton x2, Bornstein, Paisley,1958-74 Paramounts x3, 3rensho, 74 Moto TC, 73-78 Raleigh Pro's x5, Marinoni x2, 1960 Cinelli SC, 1980 Bianchi SC, PX-10 X 2

Mentioned: 245 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3920 Post(s)
Liked 4,842 Times in 2,842 Posts
Originally Posted by alexihnen View Post
I think this may be the reason for many. It's familiar, it's "iconic", the components "look" right. Most of what I collect and ride are 80s race bikes, some Dura-Ace 7400, some Campagnolo. To step back to the 70s was a leap for me, but still, everything is super familiar. To step back a generation before that means learning a bunch of new stuff and maybe buying some new tools.
Some of that should be the real appeal for all of this.

The generation before the Campy cookie cutter times is the one that teaches us where much of this comes from, both Cinelli and Campy saw and realized a market ripe for a standardization storm and capitalized on it with a vengeance that paid off in spades.

The times before were fraught with many compatibility challenges that took real men to adapt and overcome if they wanted to go the distance and win.

Mechanics and riders were wizards and performed miracles daily at every race, we have it so easy now, they could have done today with their eyes closed, bottle of wine in one hand and a cigarette in the other and regularly did so in their day.
merziac is online now  
Old 03-24-23, 04:03 PM
  #44  
iab
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
iab's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: NW Burbs, Chicago
Posts: 11,724
Mentioned: 191 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2755 Post(s)
Liked 2,887 Times in 1,150 Posts
Originally Posted by merziac View Post
Very few here are even remotely adept, let alone good enough at this to have a 57 that could be a regular rider as you.
This is what confuses me. I'm no more adept at anything than others. Hubs are hubs. Ball bearings are ball bears. ETC, etc. The biggest difference between the 57 and 77 are the cottered cranks. Which even in 77 were common on low-end bikes. There is no additional upkeep of a 57 over the 77, physically. There is definitely a perception it's different, and perception is reality.
iab is offline  
Old 03-24-23, 04:05 PM
  #45  
iab
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
iab's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: NW Burbs, Chicago
Posts: 11,724
Mentioned: 191 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2755 Post(s)
Liked 2,887 Times in 1,150 Posts
Originally Posted by SurferRosa View Post
No worries, and I expected as much. Others had already caught on without my assistance. (See post 8, for example.) Iggy list updated.
Except they didn't come right out and say it and kept it blind as my request in the OP. derp.
iab is offline  
Old 03-24-23, 04:23 PM
  #46  
Kilroy1988 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: Visalia, CA
Posts: 2,001
Mentioned: 42 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 848 Post(s)
Liked 1,300 Times in 461 Posts
To be completely honest I think that the general idea that folks would consider the '57 less serviceable for regular riding is totally aligned with the outlook of the C&V community in general... I'm only 34 years old, and when I attended Eroica I was on a bicycle from 1954. I noticed that a number of other bicycles from the 1950s or earlier were also being ridden by young people (mostly men) who were clearly enamored by the technology for the sake of what it was in times of yore.

A majority of riders were not riding frames or components any older than they were - many of them would have been familiar with the technology from their youth. This is not the same paradigm I'm living in as a young C&V rider. Everything is old, everything requires more maintenance and cleaning and everything is heavier than what I'm used to thinking of as "modern." Jumping back from 1977 to 1957 is hardly a leap for me when both dates precede my birth by more than a decade.

-Gregory
Kilroy1988 is online now  
Likes For Kilroy1988:
Old 03-24-23, 04:41 PM
  #47  
JulesCW 
Full Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Upper third of the central USA
Posts: 473

Bikes: N+1

Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 163 Post(s)
Liked 424 Times in 214 Posts
I only saw this today -- been out of town for a bit. I was going to answer the '57, as I've got a basement full of nice 70's and '80s bikes and they're of the era I grew up in, and it would be really neat to have at least one bike from the 50s or before that fit well and that i could ride.

35+ years ago I had a 1930s Schwinn road frame with some bits -- and de-accessioned it prior to a life-changing move across the country. Although I do not at all regret the move, I do regret getting rid of that bike -- never did build it up, but I imagine it would have been be fun to ride...

Someday something like it or your hypothetical '57 Cinelli might surface in my jumbo (65c+ cm) size... if it does I'll be ready!
JulesCW is offline  
Likes For JulesCW:
Old 03-24-23, 04:56 PM
  #48  
FrejusFlyer
Junior Member
 
FrejusFlyer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2018
Posts: 94
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 32 Post(s)
Liked 57 Times in 26 Posts
Originally Posted by iab View Post
This is what confuses me. I'm no more adept at anything than others. Hubs are hubs. Ball bearings are ball bears. ETC, etc. The biggest difference between the 57 and 77 are the cottered cranks. Which even in 77 were common on low-end bikes. There is no additional upkeep of a 57 over the 77, physically. There is definitely a perception it's different, and perception is reality.
I ride my early 60's Frejus interchangeably with my 80's and newer bikes without issue. The only real difference is the gearing on really big hills. No difference in reliability or maintenance. The bike was built before I was born. When I started buying bikes from the 1920's and teens, issues did pop up with braking and gearing (single speed and flexy calipers), so there is a big difference once you go back that far.
FrejusFlyer is offline  
Likes For FrejusFlyer:
Old 03-24-23, 04:59 PM
  #49  
merziac
Senior Member
 
merziac's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: PDX
Posts: 12,459

Bikes: Merz x 5 + Specialized Merz Allez x 2, Strawberry/Newlands/DiNucci/Ti x3, Gordon, Fuso/Moulton x2, Bornstein, Paisley,1958-74 Paramounts x3, 3rensho, 74 Moto TC, 73-78 Raleigh Pro's x5, Marinoni x2, 1960 Cinelli SC, 1980 Bianchi SC, PX-10 X 2

Mentioned: 245 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3920 Post(s)
Liked 4,842 Times in 2,842 Posts
Originally Posted by iab View Post
This is what confuses me. I'm no more adept at anything than others. Hubs are hubs. Ball bearings are ball bears. ETC, etc. The biggest difference between the 57 and 77 are the cottered cranks. Which even in 77 were common on low-end bikes. There is no additional upkeep of a 57 over the 77, physically. There is definitely a perception it's different, and perception is reality.
Well maybe its just my perception but we see a lot of hand wringing, pushback and consternation whenever somebody brings up cotters, many steel components and fussy oldschool components.

Many here won't go near the damn things from what I see.

I love it but freely admit I don't go there lightly, I have to gather a lot of chi, pay close attention and take my time to keep from screwing some of it up.

Your expertise and confidence on this seems to far outstrip most of us by far which I fully applaud and appreciate.

I am not as adept but do value the difference and welcome the challenges as I am stubborn.

And I consider myself a pretty good wrench of many things having been a lifelong and professional auto mech/tech as well as having spent about 25 years at the dragstrip winning, losing and making it to the next round when things went wrong.

Again, really appreciate that you're here and reality check us when you do.
merziac is online now  
Old 03-24-23, 05:15 PM
  #50  
merziac
Senior Member
 
merziac's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: PDX
Posts: 12,459

Bikes: Merz x 5 + Specialized Merz Allez x 2, Strawberry/Newlands/DiNucci/Ti x3, Gordon, Fuso/Moulton x2, Bornstein, Paisley,1958-74 Paramounts x3, 3rensho, 74 Moto TC, 73-78 Raleigh Pro's x5, Marinoni x2, 1960 Cinelli SC, 1980 Bianchi SC, PX-10 X 2

Mentioned: 245 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3920 Post(s)
Liked 4,842 Times in 2,842 Posts
Originally Posted by Kilroy1988 View Post
To be completely honest I think that the general idea that folks would consider the '57 less serviceable for regular riding is totally aligned with the outlook of the C&V community in general... I'm only 34 years old, and when I attended Eroica I was on a bicycle from 1954. I noticed that a number of other bicycles from the 1950s or earlier were also being ridden by young people (mostly men) who were clearly enamored by the technology for the sake of what it was in times of yore.

A majority of riders were not riding frames or components any older than they were - many of them would have been familiar with the technology from their youth. This is not the same paradigm I'm living in as a young C&V rider. Everything is old, everything requires more maintenance and cleaning and everything is heavier than what I'm used to thinking of as "modern." Jumping back from 1977 to 1957 is hardly a leap for me when both dates precede my birth by more than a decade.

-Gregory
Tired old guys tired of tired old bikes.

Younger guys are what it takes to keep some of this going, old stubbornness can only take you so far with rapidly diminishing returns as both body and mind proceed to betray you down the road, resistance quickly becomes futile and can often accelerate the process in the moment and beyond.

As with iab, I applaud you anyone that stays with and goes there and does that.

I still need to get after the BB on the 40's Paramount that your rack went on but as it is fine and I was able to get some lube in it after I unclogged the port it can wait.

And it is not ridden much at all so....

merziac is online now  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell or Share My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2023 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.