Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Classic & Vintage
Reload this Page >

Freewheel Threads: Grease? Anti-seize? Teflon tape? What works best?

Notices
Classic & Vintage This forum is to discuss the many aspects of classic and vintage bicycles, including musclebikes, lightweights, middleweights, hi-wheelers, bone-shakers, safety bikes and much more.

Freewheel Threads: Grease? Anti-seize? Teflon tape? What works best?

Old 05-12-23, 08:54 AM
  #1  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Sep 2021
Location: SW Florida, USA
Posts: 1,305

Bikes: Yes

Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 559 Post(s)
Liked 703 Times in 473 Posts
Freewheel Threads: Grease? Anti-seize? Teflon tape? What works best?

Need some input from the more experienced folks here.

Have a vintage wheelset I've serviced (and converted rear hub from nutted to QR). Freewheel was removed by LBS and the removal slots (Regina Corsa 2-notch) show significant damage - it had some damage before the shop removed it, but seems a bit worse now.

I've "flush and lube" serviced the freewheel per Regina's instructions. I'd like to put it back on with some hope of non-destructive removal in the future.

I know grease works to help prevent freewheels from seizing to the hub, thus making future removal easier. Anyone out there have experience with using both grease and anti-seize or teflon tape on freewheel threads (either separately, or in combination)? Or, hopefully, with all three?

Thanks in advance. Proceeding carefully here since I'm trying to prevent this being this particular freewheel's "last hurrah".
Hondo6 is offline  
Old 05-12-23, 09:00 AM
  #2  
señor miembro
 
SurferRosa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2018
Location: Pac NW
Posts: 6,662

Bikes: '70s - '80s Campagnolo

Mentioned: 93 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3921 Post(s)
Liked 6,558 Times in 3,251 Posts
Grease ... and remove it from the hub a couple times a year.
SurferRosa is offline  
Likes For SurferRosa:
Old 05-12-23, 09:07 AM
  #3  
Senior Member
 
3alarmer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Sacramento, CA
Posts: 22,994

Bikes: old ones

Mentioned: 304 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 26477 Post(s)
Liked 10,441 Times in 7,244 Posts
.
...my personal experience is with using anti-seize compound. It has always worked well for me, in cases where I need to remove or change a freewheel that I have installed previously. I use it on all aluminum to steel contact surfaces. The damaged two notches are a problem that I'm not certain is fixable. I guess you could try to clean the notches up a little by carefully filing. I almost never re-use Regina freewheels, even though they are of high quality.
3alarmer is offline  
Likes For 3alarmer:
Old 05-12-23, 10:14 AM
  #4  
Senior Member
 
steelbikeguy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Peoria, IL
Posts: 4,499
Mentioned: 86 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1836 Post(s)
Liked 3,434 Times in 1,597 Posts
Of the two choices, anti-seize is preferred, mostly because it is designed specifically for the purpose of preventing the stuff from getting stuck.
From the wiki page on grease: "Solid additives such as copper or ceramic powder are added to some greases for static high pressure and/or high temperature applications, or where corrosion could prevent dis-assembly of components later in their service life. These compounds are working as a release agent.[7][8]"

As far as recommended practices, removing the freewheel periodically is a great idea, especially if it is subjected to rain and such. The same applies to cartridge bottom brackets... I spent some time recently working to pull a BB that hadn't been out of the frame in a long time, and the bike does get ridden in the rain and snow.

Haven't tried teflon tape myself. Seems like it might work?? Nowadays, with the knowledge that teflon has ended up in the water, in our bodies, etc., it might be best to minimize any use of materials containing teflon.


Steve in Peoria
steelbikeguy is offline  
Likes For steelbikeguy:
Old 05-12-23, 10:18 AM
  #5  
Senior Member
 
Pompiere's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: NW Ohio
Posts: 3,449

Bikes: 1984 Miyata 310, 1986 Schwinn Sierra, 2011 Jamis Quest, 1980 Peugeot TH8 Tandem, 1992 Performance Parabola, 1987 Ross Mt. Hood, 1988 Schwinn LeTour, 1988 Trek 400T, 1981 Fuji S12-S LTD, 197? FW Evans

Mentioned: 24 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 541 Post(s)
Liked 1,045 Times in 536 Posts
I use anti-seize and only spin the freewheel on snug by hand. Any further tightening is done by riding.
Pompiere is offline  
Likes For Pompiere:
Old 05-12-23, 11:23 AM
  #6  
Senior Member
 
Velo Mule's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Location: Long Island, NY
Posts: 2,127

Bikes: Trek 800 x 2, Schwinn Heavy Duti, Schwinn Traveler, Schwinn Le Tour Luxe, Schwinn Continental, Cannondale M400 and Lambert, Schwinn Super Sport

Mentioned: 14 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 816 Post(s)
Liked 1,038 Times in 674 Posts
I like Anti-Seize an' all. 'used to use it all the time but.........

It's not a disease, it's Anti-seize.
Velo Mule is offline  
Likes For Velo Mule:
Old 05-12-23, 12:15 PM
  #7  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Right where I'm supposed to be
Posts: 1,653

Bikes: Franklin Frames Custom, Rivendell Bombadil

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 124 Post(s)
Liked 216 Times in 132 Posts
When I rode with freewheels of say a 25-28 tooth max, I used only grease, as that's all I knew to use. With a Phil Wood FW hub and Sachs 13-32 7speed FW's, they were harder to remove. Since I had some teflon tape on hand, I'd apply some grease to both threads, getting into the grooves, then wrap the hub threads with a couple rounds of teflon tape. That made getting them off easier. I eventually bought a 20something inch breaker bar, which made it even easier. Leverage is a wonderful thing. I finally caught on to using to using some Permatex AS so I bought a 8 oz. jar w/applicator, that'll last me a very long time. I haven't used it yet but next time I will. Likely on the BB threads too if the cartridge has aluminum threads. I've used teflon tape there too. Teflon tape is great stuff, as it also acts as a sort of thread locking "helper" a sit fills the voids of threads, which is what thread locking compounds are supposed to do. My Delta bath faucet with a single knob simply would not stay tight, even with trying various washers mean to hold the screw. Loctite blue didn't work either. So I grabbed some teflon tape and wrapped the threads and threaded it in. It's never moved since !
Garthr is offline  
Old 05-12-23, 05:39 PM
  #8  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: So Cal, for now
Posts: 2,476

Bikes: 1974 Bob Jackson - Nuovo Record, Brooks Pro, Clips & Straps

Mentioned: 22 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1106 Post(s)
Liked 796 Times in 453 Posts
Teflon tape,... well, never before have I heard of that one being used in this application.


As far as I can tell, there's only one way to remove a freewheel. It involves the use of the proper tools and a skewer. The skewer needs to be just this side of tight, too. Once the freewheel cracks loose, just a tiny fraction of a turn, you can loosen the skewer or even remove it.

I have found any other way for a home mechanic to do it without risk of damage,... almost certain damage. Plus, you already have the skewer right in front of you, so why not?

Last edited by Bad Lag; 05-12-23 at 05:44 PM.
Bad Lag is offline  
Likes For Bad Lag:
Old 05-12-23, 06:30 PM
  #9  
Senior Member
 
Chombi1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Posts: 4,520
Mentioned: 102 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1651 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 850 Times in 553 Posts
Just a little greaseshould work. Anti seize would most likely be no better. You might still find it hard to get some freewheels off hubs because of just how tight the freewheel thread tolerances are. I always find Reginas hard to bust off hubs despite having grease on the threads. Maiilard and Sachs freewheels have never been a problem for me though.
__________________
72 Line Seeker
83 Davidson Signature
84 Peugeot PSV
84 Peugeot PY10FC
84 Gitane Tour de France.
85 Vitus Plus Carbone 7
86 ALAN Record Carbonio
86 Medici Aerodynamic (Project)
88 Pinarello Montello
89 Bottecchia Professional Chorus SL
95 Trek 5500 OCLV (Project)
Chombi1 is offline  
Old 05-12-23, 07:06 PM
  #10  
Phyllo-buster
 
clubman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Nova Scotia
Posts: 8,858

Bikes: roadsters, club bikes, fixed and classic

Mentioned: 133 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2299 Post(s)
Liked 2,061 Times in 1,258 Posts
imo, Any normal grease should work fine.
Anti-seize is only required in high-heat applications. Finned alloy exhaust nuts on a Beemer for example.
clubman is offline  
Old 05-12-23, 07:41 PM
  #11  
Freewheel Medic
 
pastorbobnlnh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: An Island on the Coast of GA!
Posts: 12,907

Bikes: Snazzy* Schwinns, Classy Cannondales & a Super Pro Aero Lotus (* Ed.)

Mentioned: 141 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1465 Post(s)
Liked 2,226 Times in 976 Posts
Originally Posted by Hondo6
Need some input from the more experienced folks here.

I've "flush and lube" serviced the freewheel per Regina's instructions.....
Gasoline = Explosion 💥💥💥💥💥🤯

Flush, flush, and more flush will never remove corrosion or corroded bearings.

I'm just spitballing here, but I believe Regina is referring to using the grease tool which floods the entire interior of the body with grease. That's a no-no because grease in the pawls can be problematic. A proper disassembly, cleaning, and new grease only in the bearing races is fine.
__________________
Bob
Enjoying the GA coast all year long!

Thanks for visiting my website: www.freewheelspa.com





pastorbobnlnh is offline  
Old 05-13-23, 03:26 AM
  #12  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Sep 2021
Location: SW Florida, USA
Posts: 1,305

Bikes: Yes

Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 559 Post(s)
Liked 703 Times in 473 Posts
Originally Posted by pastorbobnlnh
Gasoline = Explosion 💥💥💥💥💥🤯

Flush, flush, and more flush will never remove corrosion or corroded bearings.

I'm just spitballing here, but I believe Regina is referring to using the grease tool which floods the entire interior of the body with grease. That's a no-no because grease in the pawls can be problematic. A proper disassembly, cleaning, and new grease only in the bearing races is fine.
IMO you're likely right about the "grease tool" being the reason for the recommendation by Regina not to use grease. And absolutely no argument that gasoline can be extremely dangerous if used (as one of the two options Regina recommends), and is far more toxic than other available choices.

The article accompanying the image I linked says it was an image of the cleaning instructions found on a Regina Extra Superlelggera freewheel can. I'd presume that can dated from the 1980s or 1990s. There's far more concern for toxicity and safety these days than 30 or 40 years ago. We know more today about the long-term dangers.

I used nitrile gloves and OMS - not gasoline - when I flushed the freewheel; I also did it in a well-ventilated area. "Me not stupid, me just sound that way sometimes."

The freewheel in question actually spun smoothly and worked well prior to flush and lube; the cogs all seemed to be in good shape as well. But since I didn't know how long it had been since it was last serviced, I opted to do the "flush and lube" anyway while the freewheel was off the hub. Hopefully that will extend its useful service life.

Last edited by Hondo6; 05-13-23 at 03:46 AM. Reason: Corrrect typo; change wording.
Hondo6 is offline  
Old 05-13-23, 04:43 AM
  #13  
Freewheel Medic
 
pastorbobnlnh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: An Island on the Coast of GA!
Posts: 12,907

Bikes: Snazzy* Schwinns, Classy Cannondales & a Super Pro Aero Lotus (* Ed.)

Mentioned: 141 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1465 Post(s)
Liked 2,226 Times in 976 Posts
@Hondo6, I should have been a bit more specific. My concern was not with you, it was with the instructions on Regina's can.

Even back in the '80s (when the label was applied to the can), we knew not to use gasoline as a cleaner or solvent due to the potential danger of fume ignition. Even then, this was not some new revelation. This specific hazard of gasoline had been well known for many decades.

Of course, this didn't stop everyone--- and it still doesn't. I know of two instances in the past couple of years, where men I had met (I did not know well) were using gasoline inappropriately, the gasoline fumes ignited, and the resulting burns caused their deaths. Both were educated and informed individuals. In fact, one was a volunteer fire fighter.

Finally, being in the hobby/business I'm in, "flush and dribble" is IMO, a short cut we'd never subject our hubs, bottom brackets, headsets, and even RD pulley/jockey wheels to. It makes me wonder if Regina wanted their freewheels to wear-out prematurely in order to generate more business? If so, the plan back-fired.
__________________
Bob
Enjoying the GA coast all year long!

Thanks for visiting my website: www.freewheelspa.com





pastorbobnlnh is offline  
Old 05-13-23, 06:57 AM
  #14  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Sep 2021
Location: SW Florida, USA
Posts: 1,305

Bikes: Yes

Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 559 Post(s)
Liked 703 Times in 473 Posts
Originally Posted by pastorbobnlnh
@Hondo6, I should have been a bit more specific. My concern was not with you, it was with the instructions on Regina's can.

Even back in the '80s (when the label was applied to the can), we knew not to use gasoline as a cleaner or solvent due to the potential danger of fume ignition. Even then, this was not some new revelation. This specific hazard of gasoline had been well known for many decades.

Of course, this didn't stop everyone--- and it still doesn't. I know of two instances in the past couple of years, where men I had met (I did not know well) were using gasoline inappropriately, the gasoline fumes ignited, and the resulting burns caused their deaths. Both were educated and informed individuals. In fact, one was a volunteer fire fighter.

Finally, being in the hobby/business I'm in, "flush and dribble" is IMO, a short cut we'd never subject our hubs, bottom brackets, headsets, and even RD pulley/jockey wheels to. It makes me wonder if Regina wanted their freewheels to wear-out prematurely in order to generate more business? If so, the plan back-fired.
I was pretty sure you weren't "calling me out". Just a poor attempt at self-depreciating humor on my part with the quote followed by the smiley.

Yes, gasoline can be deadly dangerous. It works well as a solvent; so do a number of other highly volatile and hazardous chemicals. But most of those are hazardous enough (extremely flammable and/or toxic vapors) that using them is not a good idea if you have another choice.

In most places OMS are still available and are a much safer - and better - choice. Greatly reduced chance of inadvertent ignition/explosion and much reduced inhalation toxicity (both threats are still there, just greatly reduced vis-a-vis gasoline).

Regarding your other point: yes, a complete teardown and rebuild of the freewheel would probably have been a better choice absent the notch damage. But I really didn't see the point in doing that with a freewheel that's probably not going to come off non-destructively more than once or (if I'm lucky) twice because of removal notch damage. So I chose the "flush and lube" option. Don't see how that could hurt (particularly since it was spinning freely w/o any "gritty" feel beforehand), and might extend the useful life a bit. If it doesn't, I'm out the cost of some OMS and a bit of time.

Last edited by Hondo6; 05-13-23 at 07:04 AM.
Hondo6 is offline  
Likes For Hondo6:
Old 05-13-23, 12:02 PM
  #15  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Sep 2021
Location: SW Florida, USA
Posts: 1,305

Bikes: Yes

Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 559 Post(s)
Liked 703 Times in 473 Posts
Thanks to all who provided input here.

I decided on using anti-seize and spinning the freewheel on hand-tight; did that this AM. Also decided to use anti-seize on the stem and seatpost while I was at it.
Hondo6 is offline  
Likes For Hondo6:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service -

Copyright © 2024 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.