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Clean sticky freewheel - Early uniglide hub

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Clean sticky freewheel - Early uniglide hub

Old 05-30-23, 01:07 AM
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Clean sticky freewheel - Early uniglide hub

Hi,

I have a uniglide hub (same as the one in this thread uniglide Freehub) and despite it looked NOS when I built up the wheel with it, it has gotten stuck when backpedaling and doesn't properly freewheel (chain goes slack, etc..).
How do I remove the freehub body to flush it with WD-40 and regrease it?





EDIT: just noticed that this might be more appropriate to be in the Bicycle Mechanics Forum - please move if required.
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Old 05-30-23, 01:39 AM
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Your Model 60 hub is around 40 years old in all likelihood, so C&V it is!

The easiest way to get the clicky parts clicking will be to stand the hub left-side up, tilt slightly off-axis and flow some lubricating oil between the freehub body and the hub flange.

This works almost instantly in warm weather, so warm it up for fast results if it's not warm.

The higher-end models of Shimano freehubs will have a rubber seal where you want the oil to go in, this hub may or may not have the rubber seal, you'll know it has no seal if the oil gets in and does the job.

On the higher-end freehubs, removing the axle, placing the hub horizontal and then slowly dripping about ten to fifteen medium drops of oil behind the dust shield will allow oil access to the annular space between the freehub body axle bearing cup and the outer shell of the freehub body. Slowly tilting the hub up to a 45-degree angle will than have the oil running into the freehub body's internals (unless the annular space has gotten clogged with someone's application of excess grease during a re-pack).

Last edited by dddd; 05-30-23 at 01:44 AM.
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Old 05-30-23, 03:17 AM
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Originally Posted by dddd
Your Model 60 hub is around 40 years old in all likelihood, so C&V it is!

The easiest way to get the clicky parts clicking will be to stand the hub left-side up, tilt slightly off-axis and flow some lubricating oil between the freehub body and the hub flange.

This works almost instantly in warm weather, so warm it up for fast results if it's not warm.

The higher-end models of Shimano freehubs will have a rubber seal where you want the oil to go in, this hub may or may not have the rubber seal, you'll know it has no seal if the oil gets in and does the job.

On the higher-end freehubs, removing the axle, placing the hub horizontal and then slowly dripping about ten to fifteen medium drops of oil behind the dust shield will allow oil access to the annular space between the freehub body axle bearing cup and the outer shell of the freehub body. Slowly tilting the hub up to a 45-degree angle will than have the oil running into the freehub body's internals (unless the annular space has gotten clogged with someone's application of excess grease during a re-pack).
Thanks for your answer! Greatly appreciated. Can i just use a "regular" chain oil, or do i have to use some special grade stuff?
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Old 05-30-23, 04:07 AM
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I used chainsaw bar and chain oil in my old Regina CX-S freewheel. It came recommended as an inexpensive option. It's a lot more viscous that some other oils, so more likely to stay where it needs to be. You might want to get some other recommendations before you decide on a lube.
Warning from experience: it still might seep a little at first so don't park bike on any carpet Wife or others might care about!
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Old 05-30-23, 03:20 PM
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For future reference: I did remove the axle and bearings. The old grease was quite sticky and gunked up (i guess that was the reason causing the sticky freehub in the first place). Properly flushed the old lubricant from in between the ratchets with WD40 until I saw dissolved grease leak out at the hub flange-freehub interface. Did that, until the ratched felt clicky and "dry". Then I added some chain to the out shell of the freehub body and moved the mechanism while applying the lubricant. Did that over several iterations until it felt like it moved freely and was no longer sticky. Repacked and reassembled the hub. Fingers crossed it keeps working.
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