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Peugeot U08 for my Mrs.

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Peugeot U08 for my Mrs.

Old 01-22-24, 07:40 AM
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Originally Posted by 79pmooney
I started my journey into 10-speeds buying new a UO-8 10 years older than your wife's. Blue, not green. Not much changed over that decade. Yours has a real step more durable rear derailleur, perhaps slightly less powerful brake calipers (but same levers as mine), the shifters went to the stem and no quick releases on the wheels. Basically tit-for-tat on performance and quality.

One very serious consideration - those rims. (And the brake calipers and very likely your wife's hands.) If you wife ever needs to stop going downhill, the road is wet and her hands are not large and strong, well, she simply won't. Those are rims are chrome steel. When wet, famously slipperyl The old Mafac RACERs that came on my bike but not your wife's were the most powerful non-dual-pivot caliper brake ever made. With large enough and strong enough hands, you could stop going downhill in the wet (gradually). Those Wenmann calipers on your wife's are stiffer, better feeling, easier to set up and work on but do not have the power of the Mafacs! The levers are the Mafac levers and are excellent, but - they are made for large hands. I loved 'em. Just reaching those levers is near impossible for a lot of smaller people without comprising lever location and fit.

So - a swap of the wheels to any aluminum rimmed 5-speed (120mm OLD) wheel and replacing the levers with $30 Tektros will make a huge difference and might well save a life or marriage. OLD, overall locknut distance, ie the width of the bike's rear dropouts. 120mm was the near universal standard in the '60s and early '70s. Late '70s 6-speeds using 126mm OLD became more common. (I, with my large hands and being an adventurous young man, made it 6 years with your rims and the more powerful brakes until I replaced the wheels with ones with aluminum rims. And all of a sudden, I had a bike that stopped! Really well. Your wife's will too. On aluminum rims and brake levers that work for her hands, her brakes will be just fine.)

On the OLD. 120mm OLD wheels in aluminum may be hard to chase down. If all you can find is 126mm (or the 126 you find is a better wheel; very likely) come back here and many of us can coach you through either spreading the bike to 126 or modifying the hub to 120. Both very doable. UO-8s spread easily and without any risk of harm. If after the changes your wife still wants more braking power, again, come back here. (I put 22,000 miles on my UO-8 in all weather and conditions. There was nothing it didn't see. I got to know that bike really, really well. And I still use both my UO-8's brakes and your wife's, well newer versions of both; they were both made for a very long time.)
I have a 1971 UO8 that's 99% finished, waiting on the brake hoods to show up. I found a later model Peugeot donor that was being scrapped for the aluminum wheels and, one step further, aluminum crank set and aluminum bars.. All toll, it dropped the weight by 2 1/2 lbs. and the Mafac Racer brakes with Diacomp levers work very well, wet or dry. Will post pics when the hoods arrve..
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Old 01-22-24, 12:32 PM
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Out.


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Old 01-22-24, 01:20 PM
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clearly, it wuz da Folger's whut dun it!


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Old 01-22-24, 01:59 PM
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Originally Posted by juvela
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clearly, it wuz da Folger's whut dun it!


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Mrs. Olsen must have dropped by.
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Old 01-22-24, 02:32 PM
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Originally Posted by qcpmsame
Mrs. Olsen must have dropped by.

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"Mountain Groan in the Flavour Zone."

If the stuff can dissolve those rock hard products o' electrolysis just imagine what it do to yer innards! No wonder so many Folger's drinkers have difficulties with "leaking."


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Last edited by juvela; 01-22-24 at 03:56 PM. Reason: addition
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Old 01-22-24, 03:23 PM
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Originally Posted by qcpmsame
Mrs. Olsen must have dropped by.
Those mountain women are hella strong. 😎

Congrats Brett! Time, patience and a lot of effort!!!
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Old 01-23-24, 01:15 PM
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Disassembled. I lost control of the bungee cord holding the fork while disassembling the headset. My back up plan; a 5 gallon bucket might have caught everything.

I counted 22 ball bearings (5/32) for the lower. Sound about right?

Clean, lube and replace bearings is next. And yes, fixed cup is staying put.



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Old 01-23-24, 05:39 PM
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jeu de direction -

specification is for 26 5/32" balls per race, same upper and lower

tip for next time -

unscrew things with frame/cycle upside down


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Old 01-23-24, 07:23 PM
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I also arrange a large towel or old blanket under the bike when taking apart things with lots of bearings. They usually end up settling into place on the soft folds rather than bouncing off under work benches never to be seen again (until after you have replaced them).
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Old 01-30-24, 03:44 PM
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Originally Posted by retlaw53
I have a 1971 UO8 that's 99% finished, waiting on the brake hoods to show up. I found a later model Peugeot donor that was being scrapped for the aluminum wheels and, one step further, aluminum crank set and aluminum bars.. All toll, it dropped the weight by 2 1/2 lbs. and the Mafac Racer brakes with Diacomp levers work very well, wet or dry. Will post pics when the hoods arrve..
The 1971 UO8 now road worthy








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Old 01-31-24, 07:32 AM
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Nice looking build! The bar tape is truly luxurious. Those emerald green ones really sparkle in the sun.

Where did you get the cable housing for the rear derailleur? I could use some of that for a different bike.
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Old 01-31-24, 08:01 AM
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Originally Posted by markk900
Nice looking build! The bar tape is truly luxurious. Those emerald green ones really sparkle in the sun.

Where did you get the cable housing for the rear derailleur? I could use some of that for a different bike.
Thanks! The cable housing came from several donor bikes that were being scrapped.
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Old 02-04-24, 12:10 PM
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It is a rideable bike! Sort of.

Brake pads are ancient. Shaving a few thousandths off the surface did not help. My test ride didn’t include any hills.

The front derailleur needs a fine tune. The Simplex FD is a strange device. I haven’t quite figured out how to set the “high” setting. So I did have the chain come off when shifting to the large chain ring.

Now that I’m familiar with a French bike, I can now start rehabbing Mrs. Idaho’s Peugeot.

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Old 02-13-24, 11:11 AM
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So I have a plethora of allen wrenches. Sets in the plastic holders, t-handle, Swiss army knife style, and ziploc bags of dozens of loose ones.

But not a single one to fit a Peugeot stem bolt. Trust me when I say this; French built airplanes are just as full of oddities.

A special trip to the auto parts store yielded the proper size. The cashier asked me what I was working on that required such an odd size.

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Old 02-13-24, 11:18 AM
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Originally Posted by juvela
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jeu de direction -

specification is for 26 5/32" balls per race, same upper and lower

tip for next time -

unscrew things with frame/cycle upside down


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Only 25 were installed on Mrs.Idaho’s bike on the lower race. Top was a caged set. Could it be why it felt “off” when turning side to side?
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Old 02-13-24, 11:36 AM
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Originally Posted by IdahoBrett
Only 25 were installed on Mrs.Idaho’s bike on the lower race. Top was a caged set. Could it be why it felt “off” when turning side to side?
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"generally" in a headset one wants symmetry betwixt the upper and lower stacks

retainers speed/simplify assembly and servicing but have the downside of usually not permitting as many balls per stack which means each ball carries more load than with a loose ball arrangement - can contribute to a more rapid brinneling


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Old 02-14-24, 10:43 AM
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Hello Brett,

T'is the day of Saint Valentine

you could post image(s) of you & Mrs Idaho with your respective rampant kitties

hope both now done and exhibiting smooth operation!


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Old 02-14-24, 03:37 PM
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Originally Posted by juvela
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Hello Brett,

T'is the day of Saint Valentine

you could post image(s) of you & Mrs Idaho with your respective rampant kitties

hope both now done and exhibiting smooth operation!


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Not quite there yet.

Headset disassembled and cleaned and ready for reassembly. This morning I disassembled and cleaned the BB. It’s in good shape and it’s evident that it was maintained.

Reassembly will commence in the next few days…with all new bearings and grease(of course).


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Old 02-16-24, 12:26 PM
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Attempting to set up turkey levers for my wife. They are an NOS set. Aside from different handle bars or bending and possibly breaking the levers, I can’t find a position that my wife’s fingers would reach.

I’m stumped. I could be missing something. Forest for the trees kind of thing. Or I’m just dumb.

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Old 02-16-24, 12:41 PM
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Mrs Idaho might find that a randonneur pattern bar would be more comfortable to use in conjunction with the extension brake levers

gives the fringe benefit of being able to ride in a slightly more upright position when using the "tops"

tip: the CLB brand extension levers are noticeably stiffer - less flexure - than the Weinmann-DiaCompe ones...AND they are french

another option you may wish to consider is the use of guidonnet pattern levers

here is a catalogue page showing the CLB entry -



the MAFAC ones are plastic and always seem to break




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Old 02-16-24, 01:33 PM
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Originally Posted by IdahoBrett
Attempting to set up turkey levers for my wife. They are an NOS set. Aside from different handle bars or bending and possibly breaking the levers, I can’t find a position that my wife’s fingers would reach.
I think you've found bars with a shape that doesn't work well with the Dia-compe turkey levers. I just checked a couple of my wife's bikes, one of which the turkey lever is Dia-compe branded, the other is Schwinn Approved. On both of my wife's bike's the bars are Sakae Road Champion and the shape looks different to me. Setup on the levers is tricky in that the amount of turkey lever travel is restricted if the mounting location is too low in the drop.
I don't know if the guidonnet levers would be better if your wife's fingers are having trouble reaching.
The most accommodating setup for smaller hands would likely be aero levers and interrupter levers on the tops. The Tektro interrupter levers have good brake action even if you adjust them to short reach.
Good luck!

Last edited by daverup; 02-16-24 at 01:39 PM.
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Old 02-16-24, 04:55 PM
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It’s a work in progress. I’ve done a couple of repositions of the brake lever mounting and had Mrs. Idaho place her hand on the bar. Then I removed the turkey lever and did some creative bends that involved a floor jack handle, adjustable wrench and bench vise. She can now reach the lever. I’ll be amazed if I can repeat the same angles on the other lever.

I went ahead with more assembly. I wanted Mrs. Idaho to see an almost complete bike while I borrowed her hand. Aside from trying to duplicate complex bends, all that’s left is cables, bar tape and adjustments to derailleurs and brakes.
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Old 02-16-24, 05:51 PM
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Bending those alloy turkey levers could end poorly
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Old 02-16-24, 10:19 PM
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Originally Posted by daverup
Bending those alloy turkey levers could end poorly
Yes, very much so. I attempted to mind meld with the granular structure at a sub atomic level. I carefully clamped the turkey leg…err…lever at a flattish spot in my bench vise. I then slipped the open end of a floor jack, jack handle over the end that mounts to the main body of the brake lever. I then concentrated very hard at what angle and how many foot pounds of pressure to apply a firm but gentle force. I became one with the metal. It told me when to stop applying force. And stop I did.

In a cold sweat I removed the jack handle and quickly freed the turkey lever from the bench vise. The carefully placed flat aluminum plates in the jaws kept dings and divots to a minimum. No fissures or cracks formed. A sigh of relief went out as I shakily remounted the lever to the assembly. I measured with a 6 inch machinists scale and was pleasantly surprised that I indeed had moved the lever approximately 0.6” closer to the upper, horizontal bar of the handlebar.

I dashed from the shop to the house. “Mrs. Idaho I need you to check the braking lever.” Much to my chagrin she was making herself a spot of tea. Being at 15 years of wedded bliss, she read my emotions well and set her tea down after merely a sip. Off to the shop for a fit test we went. Once again I breathed a sigh of relief as she remarked “I can reach. That’ll do.”

Now I would like to make the bend in the lever look….like it’s supposed to be that way. But I fear for the metal at a deep sub atomic level that it may not handle much more stress. Iffin’ it don’t look right after the second one is bent and bar tape is applied I’ll come up with sumthin’ else.


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Old 02-17-24, 01:54 PM
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Something like this is safe and easy for smaller hands. Velo orange portuer bar with velo orange levers. You can get both in 22.2 or 23.8 grip diameter. These work extremely well for me.
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