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1985 Peugeot PGN10 w/modernized cockpit

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1985 Peugeot PGN10 w/modernized cockpit

Old 11-28-23, 02:33 PM
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1985 Peugeot PGN10 w/modernized cockpit

I bought this bike over the summer. I didn't ride it at all (still haven't!) due to just riding my modern stuff during our short summer and not knowing how old any of the grease in the bearings was. So I let it sit until a couple of weeks ago and took it into my favorite bike shop in Bismarck, ND (Larson's Cyclery) and told the owner, Lance, to get it in shape for next spring. He was delighted to see it as he had assembled and worked on these when they were new. I'm not quite ready to tackle overhauling a helicomatic or any other French stuff quite yet as I'm trying to get my garage organized -- which mostly means selling off my motorcycles to create some workshop space -- not to mention my current lack of proper tools. Lance said that going by the condition of the bearing races, cups etc. the bike appears to have had little use. In any case, I'm looking forward to trying this good-looking Frenchy when the weather warms up.



I knew I wouldn't be able to live with the bike's stock bar and stem so Lance and I formulated a plan for a more modern cockpit consisting of a quill stem adaptor, a polished Ritchey Stem and VO bars with a comfortable bend. He was also able to re-use the orange tape that came with the bike and that goes so well with bike's funky, multi-color stripes. I don't think these originally came with orange bar tape, so that along with the bars, stem, seat and tires are the only non-stock parts I'm aware of on the bike. Oh, I think the brake hoods are replacements also.

A few close-ups of the nicely finished Ritchey stem. The bars are flat on top which I find a real boon to comfort:


Intricate, nice detailing on the faceplate:

Last edited by Maxey; 11-28-23 at 02:37 PM.
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Old 11-28-23, 03:48 PM
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Nice bike, and sensible upgrades!

Peugeot had a lot of "model proliferation", with many similar-looking models having detail differences. Your bike looks very much like mine at first glance.

Just below the PKN10 was the PH501, having lugless construction and a cheaper Carbolite 103 fork. It did also have clamping ears for securing the seatpost, but did a poor job of this on my own example until I cut the slot between the seatstays a good bit lower down along the seat tube.

I jettisoned the Helicomatic rear wheel after not finding any chain that would cure it's tendency to arrive at a false-neutral after completing a shift. I also replaced the saddle, but did find a way to retain the stock bars and stem (by moving the saddle forward a bit).

These are enjoyable racing bikes to ride, not too aggressive in geometry but still supportive of sporting efforts.

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Old 11-28-23, 04:15 PM
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Thanks, dddd. I've noticed a few other lugless Peugeots that at a glance look just like mine. If I recall correctly, the lugless ones could also use 501 tubing and had the same funky quill seatpost. Ah, the French.
According to my mechanic, the Helicomatic on mine is in good shape, so hopefully it will last a while. I have no idea if the chain is original to mine, so we'll see how it shifts once I can actually ride it. Regarding the ride, I hope it lives up to the French reputation, as a nice, supple ride means everything to my old bones!

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Old 11-28-23, 04:51 PM
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Oh man, the only way that I could like this bike better is if it had a triple. And if it were my size.
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Old 11-28-23, 05:00 PM
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Originally Posted by dddd

Just below the PKN10 was the PH501, having lugless construction and a cheaper Carbolite 103 fork. It did also have clamping ears for securing the seatpost, but did a poor job of this on my own example until I cut the slot between the seatstays a good bit lower down along the seat tube.

I jettisoned the Helicomatic rear wheel after not finding any chain that would cure it's tendency to arrive at a false-neutral after completing a shift. I also replaced the saddle, but did find a way to retain the stock bars and stem (by moving the saddle forward a bit).

These are enjoyable racing bikes to ride, not too aggressive in geometry but still supportive of sporting efforts.
I loved the way my 1989 PKN-10 rode, plus its ability to accommodate 700Cx32 tires. Peugeots, even the lower-end ones, have always looked great and ridden nicely.

Fortunately, mine was new enough not to have that Helicomatic disaster.
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Capo: 1959 Modell Campagnolo, S/N 40324; 1960 Sieger (2), S/N 42624, 42597
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Old 11-28-23, 05:50 PM
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Originally Posted by John E
I loved the way my 1989 PKN-10 rode, plus its ability to accommodate 700Cx32 tires. Peugeots, even the lower-end ones, have always looked great and ridden nicely.

Fortunately, mine was new enough not to have that Helicomatic disaster.
It's funny you mentioned the tires as I've looked at the ample room in the chain stays and thought 28s would fit no problem, which led me to wonder if 32s might also. I'm going to stay neutral about the Helicomatic, until, of course, it blows up on me.
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