Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Classic & Vintage
Reload this Page >

Did I buy the wrong size tubular tires???!

Notices
Classic & Vintage This forum is to discuss the many aspects of classic and vintage bicycles, including musclebikes, lightweights, middleweights, hi-wheelers, bone-shakers, safety bikes and much more.

Did I buy the wrong size tubular tires???!

Old 01-23-24, 02:26 PM
  #1  
Time Traveler
Thread Starter
 
BikePower's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2022
Location: Florida, USA
Posts: 326

Bikes: 1983 Ross Paragon

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 204 Post(s)
Liked 98 Times in 51 Posts
Did I buy the wrong size tubular tires???!

So Im out there about to put the new tubular tires on the 1986 Nashbar road bike and they seem to small. I cant get them on the rims to test fit them? Did I get the wrong ones? They say on the side 23 - 28". Vittoria Rally. I was told I have 700c rims. I cant find anywhere on the wheel where it says anything about its size. I hope I dont have to send these back and then wait some more for the right tires. Im really getting antsy to ride this bike!

Last edited by BikePower; 01-23-24 at 03:09 PM.
BikePower is offline  
Old 01-23-24, 02:34 PM
  #2  
Senior Member
 
ascherer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Manhattan & Woodstock NY
Posts: 2,746

Bikes: 1987 Mercian Pro, 1985 Shogun 500, early '70s Falcon San Remo, 1972 Peugeot PX-10, 1972 Schwinn Paramount P13-9, 1971 Raleigh International, 1971 Peugeot PX-10, 1970 Raleigh Professional Mk1

Mentioned: 109 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 938 Post(s)
Liked 2,932 Times in 979 Posts
Have they spent any time inflated in order to stretch them out? I recently bought a set of Vittoria Corsas and they spent a week or two unmounted and inflated (I don't remember, maybe 60-70 psi) before I tried to put them on rims. When I did it was not overly difficult.
__________________
1987 Mercian Pro, 1985 Shogun 500, 197? Falcon San Remo, 1972 Peugeot PX-10, 1972 Schwinn Paramount P13-9, 1971 Peugeot PX-10, 1971 Raleigh International, 1970 Raleigh Professional Mark I
Curator/Team Mechanic: 2016 Dawes Streetfighter, 1984 Lotus Eclair, 1975 Motobecane Jubile Mixte, 1974 Raleigh Sports, 1973 Free Spirit Ted Williams, 1972 Raleigh Super Course, 1971 Philips Sport





ascherer is offline  
Likes For ascherer:
Old 01-23-24, 02:36 PM
  #3  
Senior Member
 
gaucho777's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Berkeley, CA
Posts: 7,236

Bikes: '72 Cilo Pacer, '72 Gitane Gran Tourisme, '72 Peugeot PX10, '73 Speedwell Ti, '74 Peugeot UE-8, '75 Peugeot PR-10L, '80 Colnago Super, '85 De Rosa Pro, '86 Look Equipe 753, '86 Look KG86, '89 Parkpre Team, '90 Parkpre Team MTB, '90 Merlin

Mentioned: 87 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 830 Post(s)
Liked 2,110 Times in 553 Posts
Sounds like you have the right size tires. You do need to stretch them out a bit before glueing. The first mounting can be a challenge but stick with it. Once you get it on the rim, inflate it to max pressure and let it sit a few days prior to glueing to reduce struggling with a glued up tire.
gaucho777 is offline  
Likes For gaucho777:
Old 01-23-24, 02:58 PM
  #4  
Bianchi Goddess
 
Bianchigirll's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Shady Pines Retirement Fort Wayne, In
Posts: 27,858

Bikes: Too many to list here check my signature.

Mentioned: 192 Post(s)
Tagged: 2 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2929 Post(s)
Liked 2,923 Times in 1,491 Posts
Yep. They just need a little stretchy stretch. Most tubular users keep their spares hanging out on old rims.
__________________
One morning you wake up, the girl is gone, the bikes are gone, all that's left behind is a pair of old tires and a tube of tubular glue, all squeezed out"

Sugar "Kane" Kowalczyk
Bianchigirll is offline  
Likes For Bianchigirll:
Old 01-23-24, 11:38 PM
  #5  
Stop reading my posts!
 
unworthy1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Posts: 12,575
Mentioned: 89 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1440 Post(s)
Liked 1,059 Times in 784 Posts
the last thing you want to be is antsy when installing sewups, you have enough trouble so breathe!

Don't know why certain European makes call a 700C tire 28" but they do when it comes to tubulars. Maybe just to make newbies more antsy!
unworthy1 is offline  
Old 01-24-24, 01:35 AM
  #6  
Ride, Wrench, Swap, Race
 
dddd's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Northern California
Posts: 9,190

Bikes: Cheltenham-Pedersen racer, Boulder F/S Paris-Roubaix, Varsity racer, '52 Christophe, '62 Continental, '92 Merckx, '75 Limongi, '76 Presto, '72 Gitane SC, '71 Schwinn SS, etc.

Mentioned: 132 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1565 Post(s)
Liked 1,294 Times in 864 Posts
Originally Posted by unworthy1
the last thing you want to be is antsy when installing sewups, you have enough trouble so breathe!

Don't know why certain European makes call a 700C tire 28" but they do when it comes to tubulars. Maybe just to make newbies more antsy!
The 28" designation refers to the OD of the mounted tire.
But in this day and age, the tires that fit on 700c/28" rims aren't fatties that would have inflated to 28", they are tires that evolved into the skinny 700c tubulars of recent decades, still mounted to the same, very-old-sized 700c rims.

Don't expect durability from cheap tubulars such as the Rally, Giro, or Yellow Jersey and such. They tend to suffer a variety of failures not even related to punctures.
I haven't used them in about two decades, so they might have better quality control now. They were inferior to the cheap racing clinchers I used at the time for training, in terms of their durability. I had blisters appear under the tread many times, which led to blow-outs even running very modest pressures for my 150lbs.
Stepping up to Sprinters or Tufos, durability was quite good.
dddd is offline  
Old 01-24-24, 05:48 AM
  #7  
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2021
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 149

Bikes: Fuji, Colnago, Trek, Raleigh, Motobecane, Araya, Famolare, Elgin

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 58 Post(s)
Liked 69 Times in 38 Posts
All of this sizing discussion brings up the question: "Are there 27" tubulars, or are they all 700C?"
Maohaus is offline  
Old 01-24-24, 06:55 AM
  #8  
Senior Member
 
SJX426's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Fredericksburg, Va
Posts: 9,579

Bikes: '65 Frejus TDF, '73 Bottecchia Giro d'Italia, '83 Colnago Superissimo, '84 Trek 610, '84 Trek 760, '88 Pinarello Veneto, '88 De Rosa Pro, '89 Pinarello Montello, '94 Burley Duet, 97 Specialized RockHopper, 2010 Langster, Tern Link D8

Mentioned: 73 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1607 Post(s)
Liked 2,215 Times in 1,103 Posts
@MaoHOUS - predominantly 700c/28. There is a t least one exception for junior racing, but I don't remember the size, something like 24"
__________________
Bikes don't stand alone. They are two tired.
SJX426 is offline  
Old 01-24-24, 07:05 AM
  #9  
Freewheel Medic
 
pastorbobnlnh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: An Island on the Coast of GA!
Posts: 12,881

Bikes: Snazzy* Schwinns, Classy Cannondales & a Super Pro Aero Lotus (* Ed.)

Mentioned: 140 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1452 Post(s)
Liked 2,186 Times in 961 Posts
Originally Posted by Maohaus
All of this sizing discussion brings up the question: "Are there 27" tubulars, or are they all 700C?"
In Tubular lingo 27" = 700c and 28" = 700c.

I have no idea why there is the "27 inch" designation. If you measure the diameter of the tubular rim with an Imperial tape measure, you will come really close to 26 inches. I've seen eBay sellers who are not bike savvy list tubular wheelsets as "26 Inch Bike Wheels." I was able to purchase Dura Ace/Aero tubular wheelset at an amazing price last year because the seller listed them as "26 Inch" wheels.
__________________
Bob
Enjoying the GA coast all year long!

Thanks for visiting my website: www.freewheelspa.com





pastorbobnlnh is offline  
Old 01-24-24, 08:24 AM
  #10  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Northern NY...Brownville
Posts: 2,569

Bikes: Specialized Aethos, Specialized Diverge Comp E5

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 239 Post(s)
Liked 453 Times in 264 Posts
They are the right tire.
They are hard to get on a rim because they just 'sit' on the rim using glue to hold them in place so a very tight fit is necessary.
I always dry fitted my sewups to a spare rim/wheel to allow them to 'stretch' into shape before use. I'd let them sit for weeks or months before using them. Even then, depending on the tire brand, it is hard to get them on. Vittoria is one of the 'easier' to put on a rim and was my favorite sewup...Vittoria Corsa's 21mm ahhh those were the days.
They are difficult to put on a rim but the more you do it the easier it gets as you learn techniques to assist. I always sat on the floor and used my bare feet to hold the rim at one end while using my hands to bring the tire onto the rim.
I always started with a thin film of glue on both tire and rim...allow to dry for at least several hours then apply another thin film of glue to the rim and install the tire...once installed adjust the tire on the rim making sure it is centered...allow to dry for 24 hours before use...I never rolled a tire using this method.
Kai Winters is offline  
Old 01-24-24, 08:32 AM
  #11  
Let your bike be the tool
 
cranky old road's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: NC/SC border
Posts: 938

Bikes: '66 Raleigh Carlton, '70 Ron Cooper, '95 Bianchi CD'I, Zonal Frame with Xenon gruppo, Carbon Frame with Record Gruppo, Columbia Twosome, Terry Classic, Bianchi SX, Gravity SS/FG

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 337 Post(s)
Liked 313 Times in 193 Posts


I bought a Sprinter 26" x 22mm tire a couple of years ago by accident. No idea what wheel it is made to fit. Make an offer LOL
__________________
Never try to teach a pig to sing...

Last edited by cranky old road; 01-24-24 at 04:12 PM. Reason: Added photo
cranky old road is offline  
Old 01-24-24, 08:32 AM
  #12  
Edumacator
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Location: Goose Creek, SC
Posts: 6,781

Bikes: '87 Crestdale, '87 Basso Gap, '92 Rossin Performance EL-OS, 1990 VanTuyl, 1980s Losa, 1985 Trek 670, 1982 AD SLE, 1987 PX10, etc...

Mentioned: 59 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2434 Post(s)
Liked 3,113 Times in 1,960 Posts
Originally Posted by SJX426
@MaoHOUS - predominantly 700c/28. There is a t least one exception for junior racing, but I don't remember the size, something like 24"
Almost positive you are right. For the Triathlon 650c size maybe?
jdawginsc is offline  
Likes For jdawginsc:
Old 01-24-24, 09:30 AM
  #13  
Time Traveler
Thread Starter
 
BikePower's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2022
Location: Florida, USA
Posts: 326

Bikes: 1983 Ross Paragon

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 204 Post(s)
Liked 98 Times in 51 Posts
Originally Posted by Kai Winters
.......I always dry fitted my sewups to a spare rim/wheel to allow them to 'stretch' into shape before use. I'd let them sit for weeks or months before using them....

I always sat on the floor and used my bare feet to hold the rim at one end while using my hands to bring the tire onto the rim.
I always started with a thin film of glue on both tire and rim...allow to dry for at least several hours then apply another thin film of glue to the rim and install the tire...once installed adjust the tire on the rim making sure it is centered...allow to dry for 24 hours before use...I never rolled a tire using this method.
great instructions im going out there now and install these babies!

Do you inflate them to full.pressure while they are drying for 24 hours before use?
BikePower is offline  
Old 01-24-24, 09:49 AM
  #14  
Veteran, Pacifist
 
Wildwood's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Seattle area
Posts: 13,327

Bikes: Bikes??? Thought this was social media?!?

Mentioned: 284 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3897 Post(s)
Liked 4,830 Times in 2,228 Posts
Originally Posted by Bianchigirll
Yep. They just need a little stretchy stretch. Most tubular users keep their spares hanging out on old rims.
Everybody needs a rim for pre-stretching tubulars.


As to the question of, “Did I get the wrong ones?” The answer as always = Depends. Maybe you should have tan walls or the ‘green’ walls instead of black sidewalls. A pic of the 1986 Nashbar would help.
(the greenish color is obvious in better light)


Taping or gluing both work. Tubular tape is faster. As a longtime gluer, I now trust tape for tires 28mm or narrower.

Last edited by Wildwood; 01-24-24 at 10:11 AM.
Wildwood is online now  
Likes For Wildwood:
Old 01-24-24, 02:26 PM
  #15  
My Workshop = Happy Place
 
SharpByCoop's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2023
Location: Norwalk, CT
Posts: 88

Bikes: Schwinns, and many others.

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 42 Post(s)
Liked 224 Times in 56 Posts
I just did a pair. first time for me, and it was HARD to pull around, even stretched.

i DID expand them according to Calvin on
Put 100lbs of air in them overnight or longer as they came.

They WILL turn inside out, but apparently it won't matter. Mine fitted and are in place perfectly now (I used three coats of glue: Once on the rim and twice on the Tubular.)

Thanks to others for the insights on what 700c and 26/27" means.
SharpByCoop is offline  
Likes For SharpByCoop:
Old 01-24-24, 02:45 PM
  #16  
Senior Member
 
Trakhak's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Baltimore, MD
Posts: 5,367
Mentioned: 15 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2481 Post(s)
Liked 2,951 Times in 1,677 Posts
Originally Posted by pastorbobnlnh
In Tubular lingo 27" = 700c and 28" = 700c.

I have no idea why there is the "27 inch" designation. If you measure the diameter of the tubular rim with an Imperial tape measure, you will come really close to 26 inches. I've seen eBay sellers who are not bike savvy list tubular wheelsets as "26 Inch Bike Wheels." I was able to purchase Dura Ace/Aero tubular wheelset at an amazing price last year because the seller listed them as "26 Inch" wheels.
More info on tubular tire sizing, from Sheldon Brown's tire sizing webpage:

"Tubulars existed in several different sizes, but only 700c and 26-inch tubulars are readily available these days. Beware: sizes of 26" and 24" tubulars are not well-standardized. Take the rim with you when buying a tire, and vice versa."
Trakhak is offline  
Old 01-25-24, 05:06 AM
  #17  
“Senior” Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Dallas
Posts: 352

Bikes: 71 Lygie—72 Raleigh Grand Prix—76 Raleigh Super Course—76 Bruce Gordon—74 Raleigh International(2)—2005 Specialized Roubaix Pro

Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 115 Post(s)
Liked 153 Times in 72 Posts
Originally Posted by SharpByCoop
I just did a pair. first time for me, and it was HARD to pull around, even stretched.

i DID expand them according to Calvin on the vid on Park Tool: Put 100lbs of air in them overnight or longer as they came.

They WILL turn inside out, but apparently it won't matter. Mine fitted and are in place perfectly now (I used three coats of glue: Once on the rim and twice on the Tubular.)

Thanks to others for the insights on what 700c and 26/27" means.
Your comment about the tire turning inside out makes it sound like you aired the tire up before you mounted it?

if that’s the case, you will find it easier to mount with just a slight bit of air in the tire to hold shape.

Last edited by obuckler; 01-25-24 at 05:38 AM.
obuckler is offline  
Old 01-25-24, 09:36 AM
  #18  
My Workshop = Happy Place
 
SharpByCoop's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2023
Location: Norwalk, CT
Posts: 88

Bikes: Schwinns, and many others.

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 42 Post(s)
Liked 224 Times in 56 Posts
Originally Posted by obuckler
Your comment about the tire turning inside out makes it sound like you aired the tire up before you mounted it?

if that’s the case, you will find it easier to mount with just a slight bit of air in the tire to hold shape.
Yeah. I put 100lbs in overnight.

I wish I knew better, I took almost ALL the air out of them to mount. it was messy, yet I got it.

Next time I'll leave them inflated just a bit. Like mounting an inner tube: Give it some shape better than no air.

Thanks.
SharpByCoop is offline  
Old 01-25-24, 01:19 PM
  #19  
Old fart
 
JohnDThompson's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Appleton WI
Posts: 24,780

Bikes: Several, mostly not name brands.

Mentioned: 153 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3584 Post(s)
Liked 3,397 Times in 1,931 Posts
I always stretch the tires before gluing them. Getting a new tire on the rim to stretch can be a challenge; I use zip-ties to hold the tire in place as I wrestle up the final section. Once it's on the rim, pump it up hard and let it sit a few days before removing it for final gluing/taping.

N.B. I don't recommend fully inflating a tubular tire off the rim; it will tend to turn base-tape out, and IME that can lead to the base tape separating from the casing later on.
JohnDThompson is offline  
Likes For JohnDThompson:
Old 01-25-24, 01:30 PM
  #20  
Time Traveler
Thread Starter
 
BikePower's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2022
Location: Florida, USA
Posts: 326

Bikes: 1983 Ross Paragon

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 204 Post(s)
Liked 98 Times in 51 Posts
Originally Posted by JohnDThompson
I always stretch the tires before gluing them. Getting a new tire on the rim to stretch can be a challenge; I use zip-ties to hold the tire in place as I wrestle up the final section. Once it's on the rim, pump it up hard and let it sit a few days before removing it for final gluing/taping.

N.B. I don't recommend fully inflating a tubular tire off the rim; it will tend to turn base-tape out, and IME that can lead to the base tape separating from the casing later on.
ooops
BikePower is offline  
Old 01-25-24, 02:46 PM
  #21  
My Workshop = Happy Place
 
SharpByCoop's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2023
Location: Norwalk, CT
Posts: 88

Bikes: Schwinns, and many others.

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 42 Post(s)
Liked 224 Times in 56 Posts
Originally Posted by JohnDThompson
I always stretch the tires before gluing them. Getting a new tire on the rim to stretch can be a challenge; I use zip-ties to hold the tire in place as I wrestle up the final section. Once it's on the rim, pump it up hard and let it sit a few days before removing it for final gluing/taping.

N.B. I don't recommend fully inflating a tubular tire off the rim; it will tend to turn base-tape out, and IME that can lead to the base tape separating from the casing later on.
Pre-inflate tubular @ 100lbs... That's how I did it. I referred to an installation video
. I figured they knew better than me.

So far so good.
SharpByCoop is offline  
Old 01-25-24, 02:47 PM
  #22  
My Workshop = Happy Place
 
SharpByCoop's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2023
Location: Norwalk, CT
Posts: 88

Bikes: Schwinns, and many others.

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 42 Post(s)
Liked 224 Times in 56 Posts
Originally Posted by JohnDThompson
I always stretch the tires before gluing them. Getting a new tire on the rim to stretch can be a challenge; I use zip-ties to hold the tire in place as I wrestle up the final section. Once it's on the rim, pump it up hard and let it sit a few days before removing it for final gluing/taping.

N.B. I don't recommend fully inflating a tubular tire off the rim; it will tend to turn base-tape out, and IME that can lead to the base tape separating from the casing later on.
Pre-inflate tubular @ 100lbs... That's how I did it. I referred to an installation video provided by Michelin. I figured they knew better than me. (Jump to 1:47)


But,.. I understand your caution. So far so good.
SharpByCoop is offline  
Old 01-25-24, 03:45 PM
  #23  
“Senior” Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Dallas
Posts: 352

Bikes: 71 Lygie—72 Raleigh Grand Prix—76 Raleigh Super Course—76 Bruce Gordon—74 Raleigh International(2)—2005 Specialized Roubaix Pro

Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 115 Post(s)
Liked 153 Times in 72 Posts
That video guy is clueless. He says pre-stretch first (good advice). but he just airs up a loose tire— not mounted on a rim. He just airs it up. That is not pre-stretching!

And he doesn’t even air it up to 100 (which as you hear here not a good idea off a rim) —you can tell by how limp the tire was when he set it down.

You have to be careful who you listen to!

Addendum: As I think about it more, maybe he is saying one thing but doing another. I just looked at that part. Not the whole video.

I can see how it was confusing. So at best it was poorly presented.

Last edited by obuckler; 01-25-24 at 03:52 PM.
obuckler is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service -

Copyright © 2024 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.