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Vintage Peugeot

Old 05-07-24, 08:58 AM
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Vintage Peugeot

Greetings. I’m the new owner of a broken UO8 that I purchased from the original owner last week. He indicated he purchased it himself from an Annapolis, MD bike shop when he was entering High School. The goal is to get it up and running. I am not doing a restoration, but will try to clean things and get it working and riding. Got it for $10. Mostly needs a new chain, bottom bracket bearings, new tubes and tires, and has a missing rear spoke.

Also bought two Rusty mixtes to snag parts off of for the UO8. If all goes well I’ll have enough parts to combine the two mixes into one functional runner. They came from the Outer Banks of NC and are extremely rusty.

I’m sure I’ll have a ton of questions along the way.

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Old 05-07-24, 09:09 AM
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Old 05-07-24, 10:29 AM
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Welcome. What do you hope to do with the old bike? Do you want to keep it original or use it as a rider?

There's a lot of love for old Peugeots here. I did this with an AO-8:



It is a lovely bike to ride.
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Old 05-07-24, 11:38 AM
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Aubergine That's a great looking bike. I want to get the UO8 up and running so I can ride it and keep it. I want to keep it as original as possible within reason. Part of the fun is to get it up and rideable for as little money as possible. So far I have spent $25 to purchase 3 broken Peugeot bikes. haha.
Tonight I'm going to start taking components off and cleaning them. I'll post some photos as soon as I have the access to do that here on the website.
The Mixes came with some fun fenders with integrated front and rear lights and generators for the rear wheel. So that is kinda neat. Unfortunately, two of the lights are smashed, so I'll be doing well to get 1 working set.

The original owner guy told me that the UO8 has a different bottom bracket, so it does not have those cottered cranks. Looks like Sakae Ringyo bottom bracket and different cranks. I like the spring trap Swiss cargo rack on the back.

I also need to purchase some tools. Any recommendations for tools I should buy? I'm thinking I need a bike chain tool, bottom bracket tool, lock nut tool, at a minimum.

1. Needs new brake and shifter cables.
2. Needs new bottom bracket bearings.
3. Needs new tires and tubes.
4. Has a broken rear spoke, so I need to learn how to put in a replacement spoke. Is that very hard to do?
5. Need to clean and adjust the center pull brakes.

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Old 05-07-24, 12:34 PM
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Great Ride...

Welcome to the forum. Hope to hear how you decide to progress with your bikes. The word "Restore" has many meanings here on the forum. Some members take it quite seriously...
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Old 05-07-24, 01:33 PM
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I’m into fixing broken pinball machines and playing them. This will be my first time attempting to do the same with an old French bicycle. I am a fixer and user of things. I appreciate restorations, but I mostly get a kick out of cleaning and repairing things, then using them. I like old things to look old and I don’t mind signs of wear. I think it’s really cool when something old has been maintained and cared for enough that it works 100% and can be used. Hopefully my Peugeot UO8 can get working again soon so I can get some exercise in this summer.

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Old 05-07-24, 02:03 PM
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Well, if your desire is to make a good bike to ride, my opinion is that the original steel parts are fine (or at least acceptable), with one glaring exception: the rims. The bike can be vastly improved by lacing decent aluminum rims to the existing Normandy hubs. Besides being lighter, they brake better overall. Outside of that, let's wait to see your photos so we can assess what to improve.

This bike is not a UO-8, but a lower end racing model that came with aluminum rims as standard. It is completely stock with th exception of the brake levers. You can see that the original steel bits look and work fine. But judicious changes can make your bike more enjoyable to ride.

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Old 05-07-24, 02:48 PM
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Originally Posted by Aubergine
Well, if your desire is to make a good bike to ride, my opinion is that the original steel parts are fine (or at least acceptable), with one glaring exception: the rims. The bike can be vastly improved by lacing decent aluminum rims to the existing Normandy hubs. Besides being lighter, they brake better overall. Outside of that, let's wait to see your photos so we can assess what to improve.

This bike is not a UO-8, but a lower end racing model that came with aluminum rims as standard. It is completely stock with th exception of the brake levers. You can see that the original steel bits look and work fine. But judicious changes can make your bike more enjoyable to ride.
An early PA-10, in blue yet! That is a rare bird in the US. I see you kept the stock 52-45T up front, but did the usual 14-21 to 14-28 conversion in back. The frame fit Zefal HP-X along the seat tube is a great improvement over the original pump.

How durable are those tubulars? I gave up tubulars in the early 1980s after moving to north coastal San Diego County and discovering goat head thorns, but I really should put tubulars on one of the Capo Siegers.
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Old 05-07-24, 03:34 PM
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Originally Posted by John E
An early PA-10, in blue yet! That is a rare bird in the US. I see you kept the stock 52-45T up front, but did the usual 14-21 to 14-28 conversion in back. The frame fit Zefal HP-X along the seat tube is a great improvement over the original pump.
The previous owner had already changed the freewheel, smart man. The bike originated in Berzerkeley, and I still have the 1971 bike license plate for it. The store's decal is also still on the seat tube.

How durable are those tubulars? I gave up tubulars in the early 1980s after moving to north coastal San Diego County and discovering goat head thorns, but I really should put tubulars on one of the Capo Siegers.
I rode in San Diego for a decade and never had any problems, but i was fanatic about brushing off my tires at the slightest hint of spiky substances . . . . They almost always failed at the valve rather than from a puncture.
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Old 05-07-24, 09:35 PM
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Originally Posted by RustyPeugeot
Aubergine That's a great looking bike. I want to get the UO8 up and running so I can ride it and keep it. I want to keep it as original as possible within reason. Part of the fun is to get it up and rideable for as little money as possible. So far I have spent $25 to purchase 3 broken Peugeot bikes. haha.
Tonight I'm going to start taking components off and cleaning them. I'll post some photos as soon as I have the access to do that here on the website.
The Mixes came with some fun fenders with integrated front and rear lights and generators for the rear wheel. So that is kinda neat. Unfortunately, two of the lights are smashed, so I'll be doing well to get 1 working set.

The original owner guy told me that the UO8 has a different bottom bracket, so it does not have those cottered cranks. Looks like Sakae Ringyo bottom bracket and different cranks. I like the spring trap Swiss cargo rack on the back.

I also need to purchase some tools. Any recommendations for tools I should buy? I'm thinking I need a bike chain tool, bottom bracket tool, lock nut tool, at a minimum.

1. Needs new brake and shifter cables.
2. Needs new bottom bracket bearings.
3. Needs new tires and tubes.
4. Has a broken rear spoke, so I need to learn how to put in a replacement spoke. Is that very hard to do?
5. Need to clean and adjust the center pull brakes.
sounds like a great project! I’m looking forward to pictures. I think you’ll find that Evaporust is your friend for cleaning up components. Fine steel wool is good on chromed steel for removing rust and polishing.

Is this a 27” wheeled bike? I recently purchased some EVO Dash 27x1-1/4 tires since they were the cheapest I could find and they seem quite decent and are made by Vee Tire. I have mounted them but not ridden yet.

For tools, I have some Park Tool and some off brands. Sometimes the determining factor is price difference (the Park is only slightly more, or is a lot more) and sometimes simplicity of the tool (hard to mess up a cheap one too bad) or I’ll buy better if I’ll use it a lot or have used an inferior one in the past. I have Park chain tool, cable/housing cutters, freewheel and cassette tools; X Tools crank puller has done fine; same with Bike Hand chain whip. Cone wrenches are maybe X Tools—cheaper set that has served me well. I found some of the headset and bottom bracket wrenches used.

Good luck on the project!
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Old 05-08-24, 09:39 AM
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Last night I got the chain off of the rusty white Mixte. I think it is a UE18 because of the strange handle bars and fenders with lights on the front and back. Looking at the back wheel, the white one has the <77> year date stamped on the rim. After removing the chain, I next removed the Simplex derailleur. It looks like a long cage model and my blue UO8 has a short cage Simplex derailleur. I like how the body of the long cage model has more metal to it. My U08 derailleur has a broken jockey wheel. Ideally, I would like to move the short cage over to the one that has the long cage on it. It seems like it would work. If not, I'll stick with the short arm all plastic Simplex and get it working with a new jockey wheel.

Since my blue U08 has a broken spoke, I messed around with removing a spoke from the rusty white Mixte rear wheel. I removed the wheel, tire, and innertube from the rim and used a 5.5mm socket to get the nipple unscrewed from the rim. However, I need to figure out how to remove the free wheel gears on the back wheel in order to remove the spoke without bending it. So I need to figure out what special tool I'll need for that.

Fun project so far. The Primary goal is to get the blue UO8 working and ride it a bunch. Secondary goal is to combine parts from the two rusty Mixte UE18 bikes to get one functional rusty bike that rides and works properly. Third goal is to do all of that as cheap as possible.
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Old 05-08-24, 10:03 AM
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Originally Posted by RustyPeugeot
Last night I got the chain off of the rusty white Mixte. I think it is a UE18 because of the strange handle bars and fenders with lights on the front and back. Looking at the back wheel, the white one has the <77> year date stamped on the rim. After removing the chain, I next removed the Simplex derailleur. It looks like a long cage model and my blue UO8 has a short cage Simplex derailleur. I like how the body of the long cage model has more metal to it. My U08 derailleur has a broken jockey wheel. Ideally, I would like to move the short cage over to the one that has the long cage on it. It seems like it would work. If not, I'll stick with the short arm all plastic Simplex and get it working with a new jockey wheel.
Yes, thé mixte with rack and lights is a UE18. The long cage derailleur sounds like it is a more recent version. FWIW the older Delrin rear derailleurs worked well enough for the time, although it was common to replace them with contemporary Suntour Honor or V-GT derailleurs (which were excellent.) The front Simplex derailleur, by contrast, breaks easily and can best be replaced by just about anything else, Suntour. Shimano, Huret, Campagnolo, etc.

Since my blue U08 has a broken spoke, I messed around with removing a spoke from the rusty white Mixte rear wheel. I removed the wheel, tire, and innertube from the rim and used a 5.5mm socket to get the nipple unscrewed from the rim. However, I need to figure out how to remove the free wheel gears on the back wheel in order to remove the spoke without bending it. So I need to figure out what special tool I'll need for that.
Can you tell us what brand of freewheel you have? There are tools designed to fit the splines or indents of the freewheel, which enable you to unscrew them from the hub.

Fun project so far. The Primary goal is to get the blue UO8 working and ride it a bunch. Secondary goal is to combine parts from the two rusty Mixte UE18 bikes to get one functional rusty bike that rides and works properly. Third goal is to do all of that as cheap as possible.
A good goal. Hope we're able to help!
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Old 05-08-24, 12:32 PM
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Aubergine thank you for the help so far. I'll have some time to look at the freewheel on Thursday evening. I'll clean it up and see if I can locate a manufacturer name on it. I'm looking forward to being allowed to post some photos here.
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Old 05-08-24, 04:50 PM
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Just shined up the Pletscher cargo rack a bit!
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Old 05-08-24, 10:03 PM
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We need pics!

2 more posts to go
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Old 05-08-24, 11:53 PM
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What’s the trick to post photos here?
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Old 05-09-24, 03:32 AM
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Old 05-09-24, 11:42 AM
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Old 05-09-24, 12:06 PM
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Blue bike is very nice and looks mostly original. The rear derailleur claw is not mounted properly though. I also suspect the seatpost is not original. Check the diameter of the post and we can see if it fits properly.

The white bike is indeed a UE18 from around 1977 but the red bike is a few years newer, was made with Carbolite steel, and would have had a different model designation. I flipped through the catalogs on line but could not find a match, I'm afraid.
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Old 05-09-24, 12:17 PM
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Has a modified bottom bracket and cranks.

#pinball and Peugeot content.
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Old 05-09-24, 07:08 PM
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Seat post is something like 26.6 mm or 26.06 mm, I can’t remember. Polished the seat post while looking at it.

Rear wheel gears appear to be Maillard and made in France. Looks to have 24 splines on it. Guess I need a special tool to remove that.

Bottom Bracket is Sakae and not cottered with a bolt. It has play in it. Haven’t tried to remove it. But polished the sprocket and crank arms some.

Also polished the neck for the handlebars, whatever that is called.

Any advice for the correct tools I need to buy to remove the bottom bracket and rear gears?

I need to buy new cables. Can I get those pretty much anywhere? Are they a specific size I need to buy?



Shined Simplex

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Old 05-10-24, 09:15 AM
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Originally Posted by RustyPeugeot
Seat post is something like 26.6 mm or 26.06 mm, I can’t remember. Polished the seat post while looking at it.
On all the Peugeots I have worked on, the interior diameter of the seat tube is 25.5mm, an odd size. As it came from the factory, the bike used a steel post with a thick shim. If I replace the original post I need to use one in 25.4 mm and fashion a shim to take up the last .1 mm. Check that seat post of yours again.

Rear wheel gears appear to be Maillard and made in France. Looks to have 24 splines on it. Guess I need a special tool to remove that.
Yes, you do. https://www.ebay.com/itm/27597406012...mis&media=COPY

Bottom Bracket is Sakae and not cottered with a bolt. It has play in it. Haven’t tried to remove it. But polished the sprocket and crank arms some.
You will need a crank arm puller like this: https://www.ebay.com/itm/22179848019...mis&media=COPY

Also polished the neck for the handlebars, whatever that is called.
It's called the handlebar stem. What you should do is remove it and look at the top of the slots. If there is any sign of a crack, the stem should be tossed. If there is no cracking, a good practice is to drill a a hole at the very top of the slots, which removes the sharp edged stress risers that lead to cracks.

Any advice for the correct tools I need to buy to remove the bottom bracket and rear gears?
We don't yet know what type of bottom bracket you have.

I need to buy new cables. Can I get those pretty much anywhere? Are they a specific size I need to buy?
You can get cables and housing pretty much anywhere. You should make sure you get metal ferrules to cap both the brake and shifter housing. Some cable sets come with nylon caps for the shift housing, but they are not up to the job.
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Old 05-10-24, 10:13 AM
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Bummed that the 24 spline tool costs more than the bike, but oh well. Ordered the 24 spline tool from ebay. Won't get here for a month....maybe....hopefully....
Guess I need to stick with old Peugeot bikes now that I'll have the flywheel tool.

I'll focus on the bottom bracket next. Hopefully I can dig into that some tonight in the garage.

Then move onto the brakes.
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Old 05-10-24, 11:52 AM
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Not sure if you couldn't go to a local bike shop who may have the freewheel tool....I mean, I am all for buying tools and the Atom freewheel tooI bought in 1974 for a different Peugeot is still in use, but I am also frugal (aka a cheapskate) and might have checked for a quicker/cheaper alternative first. I have done this before with my LBS and they were happy to pop the freewheel off for free (I don't make a habit of it).


The crank puller though is likely to be useful on multiple bikes - so you would be making a good investment there. If I am not mistaken, the person who did the cotterless crank update used the original bottom bracket cups (which is quite acceptable - mine is the same) and so once the crank is off you won't need other special tools to work on the bottom bracket (unless you want to removed the fixed cup which I don't think is necessary).

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Old 05-10-24, 01:18 PM
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markk900 I sympathize with you, I'm cheap, and my blue Peugeot is cheap. I decided that the most fun part of the project is doing all the work myself and learning some new things. The bike has plenty of other work that needs to be done in the mean time.

I hope to work on the bottom bracket tonight. A work buddy who is into vintage Italian bikes loaned me a bottom bracket tool.
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