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Peugeot Ue8m

Old 05-17-24, 09:24 AM
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Peugeot Ue8m

I recently received a Peugeot UE8M as a gift and I'm considering either restoring it to a clean, running state or converting it into a fixie. I already have a daily driver (Riverside Touring 920) and I'm on a tight budget right now.

The bike has a few issues that need addressing:
  • The front derailleur is broken (any recommendations for a replacement?)
  • The old, sticky drop bar tape has been removed
  • The fork ball bearings need replacing (I lost half of them during removal)
I have basic tools and am based in Germany. I don't have access to other bikes for parts, so I'll need to buy everything. How much do you think this will cost? Is it worth the investment?

I cannot post pic of the Bike since I do not have 10 posts. I'll upload them as soon as I can.
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Old 05-17-24, 09:36 AM
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Originally Posted by Epilogue4573
I cannot post pic of the Bike since I do not have 10 posts. I'll upload them as soon as I can.
Pic Assist - Picture by Epilogue4573 | 34044115 | (bikeforums.net)

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Old 05-17-24, 09:51 AM
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-----

the adjustable bottom bracket cup appears odd


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Last edited by juvela; 05-17-24 at 10:06 AM. Reason: addition
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Old 05-17-24, 09:52 AM
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Certainly worth it, it looks to be in pretty reasonable condition, I have recently acquired an A08 which is similar and converted it to single speed with a freewheel which has produced a nice basic looking but usable bike.

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Old 05-17-24, 10:19 AM
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Your bike has a Carbolite frame, which I found to offer a pleasant ride. It looks to have aluminum rims, a big plus. For a front derailleur, just about anything will serve as a replacement. Huret, Suntour, Shimano, Campagnolo, all work fine. As for the headset bearings (which you called the fork bearings) you can ask a shop for replacement caged bearings, but you may be better off using loose balls.

It will make a nice bike for you with a little work.
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Old 05-17-24, 10:26 AM
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Originally Posted by juvela
-----

the adjustable bottom bracket cup appears odd

-----
It actually does. Also I have no clue on what part broke as soon soon as I removed the fork (the one in my hand).

Originally Posted by Small cog
Certainly worth it, it looks to be in pretty reasonable condition, I have recently acquired an A08 which is similar and converted it to single speed with a freewheel which has produced a nice basic looking but usable bike.
I had in mind something like yours but with a drop bar! Yours looks fabulous. Which part were needed for the transformation ( single speed, freewheel and new chain only?)


Originally Posted by Aubergine
Your bike has a Carbolite frame, which I found to offer a pleasant ride. It looks to have aluminum rims, a big plus. For a front derailleur, just about anything will serve as a replacement. Huret, Suntour, Shimano, Campagnolo, all work fine. As for the headset bearings (which you called the fork bearings) you can ask a shop for replacement caged bearings, but you may be better off using loose balls.
It will make a nice bike for you with a little work.
How do I know for sure it has aluminum rims? I am actually quite a noob, sorry. I am more inclined to go with fixed gear since I do not like very much changing gear without having the hands on my breaks :/ .
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Old 05-17-24, 10:32 AM
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Originally Posted by juvela
-----

the adjustable bottom bracket cup appears odd-----
What are you seeing? I can't tell from the pics.
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Old 05-17-24, 10:39 AM
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Originally Posted by Epilogue4573
It actually does. Also I have no clue on what part broke as soon soon as I removed the fork (the one in my hand).
That is a lock washer to hold the headset in its proper adjustment when the top nut is tightened down.

How do I know for sure it has aluminum rims? I am actually quite a noob, sorry.
A magnet will tell you! And don't fret over being a noob. We all were at one point.

I am more inclined to go with fixed gear since I do not like very much changing gear without having the hands on my brakes :/ .
Is your location relatively flat?
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Old 05-17-24, 10:46 AM
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Originally Posted by Epilogue4573
I had in mind something like yours but with a drop bar! Yours looks fabulous. Which part were needed for the transformation ( single speed, freewheel and new chain only?)
Thank you, I replaced most of the steel with a few aluminium parts off of a higher end model and a couple of SR parts that I used but yes to convert to single speed a freewheel, single front chainring and a new chain was all it took.
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Old 05-20-24, 08:14 AM
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Originally Posted by Aubergine
What are you seeing? I can't tell from the pics.
This is the one that doesn't feel right. I also broke it and have no idea on where to get it as a replacement.
Originally Posted by juvela
-----
The last photo here
-----



Originally Posted by Aubergine
That is a lock washer to hold the headset in its proper adjustment when the top nut is tightened down.
Is your location relatively flat?
Mostly flat but the travel paths have some nice hills. But I guess I have my gravel bike for those ones.

Originally Posted by Small cog
Thank you, I replaced most of the steel with a few aluminium parts off of a higher end model and a couple of SR parts that I used but yes to convert to single speed a freewheel, single front chainring and a new chain was all it took.
I am checking Aliexpress for some cheap parts. I am waiting for some tools I still don't have (e.g. the one to open up the chain).

I will update here when those arrive.
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Old 05-20-24, 08:37 AM
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I also can't seem to be able to remove the pedals. I broke a hex tool trying to remove it from the bike. Is there anything I can do it to make it a little bit looser?
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Old 05-21-24, 06:45 AM
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Originally Posted by Epilogue4573
I also can't seem to be able to remove the pedals. I broke a hex tool trying to remove it from the bike. Is there anything I can do it to make it a little bit looser?
First, soak the threads with WD40 or other penetrating oil. The longer the soak the better.

You need a 15mm pedal wrench with a long handle to gain leverage. Also, don't forget that one is reverse threaded. Both pedals unthread towards the rear wheel and both pedals tighten towards the front wheel.
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Old 05-21-24, 11:17 AM
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My mnemonic is: the pedal you put your left foot on is left-threaded.
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Old 05-27-24, 03:59 AM
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I bought wd40, and ordered a new hex wrenched and a bottom bracket removal tool. I am waiting to remove the bottom bracket to order new bearings.
I am still unsure on:
  • Which type of grease should I buy? Do you have some recommendations?
  • I am trying to look for a front derailleur on Aliexpress/Ebay. I found a Suntour AC 2000 for 20 Euro, how can I be sure it will be compatible?
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Old 05-27-24, 05:44 AM
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Originally Posted by noglider
My mnemonic is: the pedal you put your left foot on is left-threaded.
Another mnemonic- pedals are threaded ‘right’ (right) & ‘wrong’ (left)..
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Old 05-27-24, 07:22 AM
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Originally Posted by Epilogue4573
I bought wd40, and ordered a new hex wrenched and a bottom bracket removal tool. I am waiting to remove the bottom bracket to order new bearings.
I am still unsure on:
  • Which type of grease should I buy? Do you have some recommendations?
  • I am trying to look for a front derailleur on Aliexpress/Ebay. I found a Suntour AC 2000 for 20 Euro, how can I be sure it will be compatible?
You can get $pecial bike grea$e, but lots of stuff works. A small tub of bearing grease from an auto parts store will last for a long time. I’ve done this.

Peugeot and other French builders often used metric tubing sizes rather than what became “standard” so a front derailleur might be a bit of a trick. The French diameter for that tube is smaller than the English/Japanese, so a lot of people use shims. There might be an old bike shop in your town? Older ones sometimes have stashes of old or oddball parts, and you might get lucky. Sheldon Brown’s site has some good info: https://sheldonbrown.com/velos.html

I’ve only ridden one briefly, but old Peugeots like that have a reputation for being “good.” Not “best,” not flashy, or fancy, but good. Maybe a little velo-divergent, but reliably pleasant and useful bikes to own and ride.

Ball bearing sizes … most headsets, hubs, and bottom brackets use similar size and number of ball bearings, French, English, Japanese, Swiss, whatever. You can get a spoke ruler from that giant on-line place for about $9 that will have holes for common ball bearing sizes. Also will have holes for the cotter sizes … your Peugeot most likely wants a 9mm cotter, for example.

But the late Sheldon Brown’s website has just enormous amounts of really useful information. Much gratitude is due to both him and the people who keep the site going.
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