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2024 Getting My Peugeot Ready to Ride

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2024 Getting My Peugeot Ready to Ride

Old 05-21-24, 06:29 PM
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Frame near crank


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Old 05-21-24, 06:31 PM
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SunTour BL DeRailleur already on Bike


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Old 05-21-24, 06:32 PM
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Bull Horn Handlebars



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Old 05-21-24, 06:33 PM
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Rear axle + Flywheel on bike


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Old 05-21-24, 06:33 PM
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Trim

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Old 05-21-24, 06:34 PM
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Full Bike


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Old 05-21-24, 06:47 PM
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2024!!!!!!! - Stuart Black in 2007 - Donated a Campagnolo Omega Strada Hardox - aero V rim in tubular version 32 hole 700C - Thank you again!!!

Repair of this bike was put on hold when a friend riding a bike on Broadway NYC was doored, by a woman getting out of a cab streetside, then thrown and crushed to death under an 18 wheeler passing by. Realize it's time now to finish upgrading this bike - to get out of the studio - see the parks in NYC - get healthy exercise and get in shape. Bullhorn handlebars might be a nice female magnet as well. Added a 5 speed flywheel -

Does this Compagnola rim go on the Front ? Rear? Do I keep the rims already on this bike, and add new tires to one of them, plus a tire to the Compagnola?



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Old 05-21-24, 07:09 PM
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Originally Posted by Liquidfusion
2024!!!!!!! - Stuart Black in 2007 - Donated a Campagnolo Omega Strada Hardox - aero V rim in tubular version, 28 or 32 hole.700C - Thank you again!!!

Repair of this bike was put on hold when a friend riding a bike on BRoadway NYC was doored, by a woman getting out of a cab streetside, then thrown and crushed to death under an 18 wheeler passing by. Realize it's time now to finish upgrading this bike - to get out of the studio - see the parks in NYC - get healthy exercise and get in shape. Bullhorn handlebars might be a nice female magnet as well. Added a 5 speed flywheel -

Does this Compagnola rim go on the Front ? Rear? Do I keep the rims already on this bike, and add new tires to one of them, plus a tire to the Compagnola?



Completely off topic, but I was admiring your 4-channel Tokyo ElectroAcoustic Company tape deck. I am a Tandberg man myself, but I have always liked TEACs, as well.
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Old 05-21-24, 07:23 PM
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Originally Posted by John E
Completely off topic, but I was admiring your 4-channel Tokyo ElectroAcoustic Company tape deck. I am a Tandberg man myself, but I have always liked TEACs, as well.
Getting the Peugeot fixed up is my Summer Goal = letting me balance life - Get out of the studio to ride and see the sky and trees - meet people - see the world in between. Peugeot is in the upper right of the 1st photo.

Have to save up for the parts. Will post progress and let everyone know how it goes: New Tires - Chain - Brake pads - Need to attach 5 and 10 speed gear lines to derailleur - Tape handlebars.

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Old 05-22-24, 10:09 AM
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Originally Posted by Liquidfusion
Repair of this bike was put on hold when a friend riding a bike on Broadway NYC was doored, by a woman getting out of a cab streetside, then thrown and crushed to death under an 18 wheeler passing by.
That is truly horrific. I gave up cycling for most of the 20 years I lived in NYC after 2 run-ins with taxis and 1 with a mook from NJ.
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Old 05-22-24, 10:43 AM
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Originally Posted by Liquidfusion
Full Bike


Thanks for the pics. It's still a bit hard to see what all is there, but let's make a start.

First off, a bike in that condition needs to be stripped so that the bearings (wheel hubs, bottom bracket, headset) can be checked. They will at the least need to be cleaned and regreased, and possibly replaced.

The wheels appear to be aluminum. If so, they should be cleaned and trued. If steel, they should be replaced. I'd replace tubes and tires as well.

The seat post and handlebar stem should be pulled out. The stem should be checked for cracks. If all is ok they can be regreased and reinstalled.

The handlebar should be replaced with something more usable on the streets. NOTE: The handlebar stem may require a bar that is 25 mm in diameter.

The brakes look like MAFAC Racers, which are good brakes. You should replace the pads with Salmon Kool Stop pads.

The chain should be replaced. Take a good pic of the Freewheel so we can check the wear on the teeth. The crank teeth look acceptable to me.

The shift levers appear to be replacements and are out of place on the frame. You should decide where you want the shifters to be -- either on the down tube, the handlebar stem, or the ends of the handlebars -- and then we can discuss your options.

The shift and brake cables and housing all need to be replaced.

Regarding your derailleurs, it appears that you already have decent Suntour parts on the bike. They should be removed, cleaned, and reinstalled if they are in decent shape.

That's what I see off the top of my head. Anyone else chime in?
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Old 05-22-24, 12:39 PM
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Originally Posted by Aubergine
Thanks for the pics. It's still a bit hard to see what all is there, but let's make a start.

First off, a bike in that condition needs to be stripped so that the bearings (wheel hubs, bottom bracket, headset) can be checked. They will at the least need to be cleaned and regreased, and possibly replaced.

The wheels appear to be aluminum. If so, they should be cleaned and trued. If steel, they should be replaced. I'd replace tubes and tires as well.

The seat post and handlebar stem should be pulled out. The stem should be checked for cracks. If all is ok they can be regreased and reinstalled.

The handlebar should be replaced with something more usable on the streets. NOTE: The handlebar stem may require a bar that is 25 mm in diameter.

The brakes look like MAFAC Racers, which are good brakes. You should replace the pads with Salmon Kool Stop pads.

The chain should be replaced. Take a good pic of the Freewheel so we can check the wear on the teeth. The crank teeth look acceptable to me.

The shift levers appear to be replacements and are out of place on the frame. You should decide where you want the shifters to be -- either on the down tube, the handlebar stem, or the ends of the handlebars -- and then we can discuss your options.

The shift and brake cables and housing all need to be replaced.

Regarding your derailleurs, it appears that you already have decent Suntour parts on the bike. They should be removed, cleaned, and reinstalled if they are in decent shape.

That's what I see off the top of my head. Anyone else chime in?
What about the Compagnola wheel - put that in the real wheel space? Thanks for all your comments.
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Old 05-22-24, 01:03 PM
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Originally Posted by Liquidfusion
What about the Compagnola wheel - put that in the real wheel space? Thanks for all your comments.
That’s a rear wheel, and if a tubular rim, if it needs replacing, is kind of a pain to do...(needs un-gluing/re-gluing).

Keep it simple and incremental. watch videos and/or go to a coop for advice and tools. If you are handy, you can get it to work.
1. From a safety standpoint, tires, brake pads and cables are key.
2. From a performance standpoint, degreasing the bike repacking bearings, wheel truing and cleaning (rubbing alcohol), chain replacement are key.

Just take your time. there are plenty of resources. I suggest, in order...
1. Sheldon Brown for definitions and descriptions of parts and how they work. It is excellent and can be done in chunks.
2. RJ the bike guy fixit videos
3. Here. In this thread/CV boards
4. Park Tool videos.

If you are not in a hurry focus on one thing at a time.

You will need a few special tools but not that many.
SPECIAL: Chain tool, crankset extractor tool, maybe a combination spoke wrench
NOT SPECIAL: adjustable wrench 10” or so, metric combination wrenches (8,9,10,12, 13, 14, 15 are the most used), Allen wrenches (3,4,5,6), pliers, screwdrivers, cable cutters.
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Old 05-22-24, 01:59 PM
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Originally Posted by Liquidfusion
What about the Compagnola wheel - put that in the real wheel space? Thanks for all your comments.
my suggestion is to get the existing bike set up well first. Then you can decide what you may want to do with that Campagnolo wheel. For one thing, wheels for old Peugeots commonly came in the size marked 27", with an ETRTO standard diameter of 630mm. More modern wheels are called 700c, with a diameteer of 622 mm. They are not interchangeable; tires for one will not fit the other. So like I said, let's focus on what you currently have first and then you can plan possible changes.
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Old 05-22-24, 06:21 PM
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Originally Posted by jdawginsc
That’s a rear wheel, and if a tubular rim, if it needs replacing, is kind of a pain to do...(needs un-gluing/re-gluing).

Keep it simple and incremental. watch videos and/or go to a coop for advice and tools. If you are handy, you can get it to work.
1. From a safety standpoint, tires, brake pads and cables are key.
2. From a performance standpoint, degreasing the bike repacking bearings, wheel truing and cleaning (rubbing alcohol), chain replacement are key.

Just take your time. there are plenty of resources. I suggest, in order...
1. Sheldon Brown for definitions and descriptions of parts and how they work. It is excellent and can be done in chunks.
2. RJ the bike guy fixit videos
3. Here. In this thread/CV boards
4. Park Tool videos.

If you are not in a hurry focus on one thing at a time.

You will need a few special tools but not that many.
SPECIAL: Chain tool, crankset extractor tool, maybe a combination spoke wrench
NOT SPECIAL: adjustable wrench 10” or so, metric combination wrenches (8,9,10,12, 13, 14, 15 are the most used), Allen wrenches (3,4,5,6), pliers, screwdrivers, cable cutters.
Sounds good. Thank you!!!
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Old 05-22-24, 06:27 PM
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Old 05-22-24, 06:29 PM
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Originally Posted by Aubergine
my suggestion is to get the existing bike set up well first. Then you can decide what you may want to do with that Campagnolo wheel. For one thing, wheels for old Peugeots commonly came in the size marked 27", with an ETRTO standard diameter of 630mm. More modern wheels are called 700c, with a diameter of 622 mm. They are not interchangeable; tires for one will not fit the other. So like I said, let's focus on what you currently have first and then you can plan possible changes.
Rear tire - Kendra (37 - 630) 27 X 13/8
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Old 05-22-24, 06:32 PM
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Love it! I’m in the middle of trying to get my own UO8 on the road. Having fun working on my bottom bracket spindle so far!
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Old 05-22-24, 06:41 PM
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Originally Posted by Liquidfusion
Rear tire - Kendra (37 - 630) 27 X 13/8
one mystery solved! You have 27" wheels, with the 630 mm diameter. The Campa wheel will be 700c, 622 mm in diameter. So not the same size. If you choose to use the Campa wheel you will be best off getting a 700c front wheel to match.
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Old 05-22-24, 07:12 PM
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Originally Posted by Aubergine
one mystery solved! You have 27" wheels, with the 630 mm diameter. The Campa wheel will be 700c, 622 mm in diameter. So not the same size. If you choose to use the Campa wheel you will be best off getting a 700c front wheel to match.
Can I have two different size wheels on a bike? Example: 27" wheel on the front and a 700c wheel on rear of the U08? - added a flywheel to the Compagnola wheel years ago

Reading it's best to keep wheels same type for both - so using the 700c Compagnola - I need to buy a 700c for the front wheel. What do you prefer / recommend?

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Old 05-22-24, 07:44 PM
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Originally Posted by RustyPeugeot
Love it! I’m in the middle of trying to get my own UO8 on the road. Having fun working on my bottom bracket spindle so far!
Googled - Overhaul Bottom Bracket On Vintage Peugeot Bike - I believe with the right tools - I can do this

Overhaul Bottom Bracket On Vintage Peugeot Bike - RJ The Bike Guy


Made notes:
5:52 - remove the adjustable cup
6:02 - turn locknut - lockring - counter clockwise to loosen
6:20 - remove the adjustable cup - with wrench counterclockwise
6:52 - Note Direction - shorter part of spindle = non drive side - longer part of spindle = drive side
6:56 - loose bearings
7:30 - Remove Fixed Cup
Vintage French and Italian bikes - right hand threaded - remove by turning counter clockwise
Park Tool HCW4 Wrench

8:04 - use mallet to remove fixed cup
9:08 - broken loose - knock it off
8:30 - use solvent to clean parts
8:35 - use rag with solvent to wipe out the bottom bracket shell to remove grease and dirt and get threads as clean as you can get them
8:50 - cleaned parts with mineral spirits
9:01 - 22 1/4" bearings = 11 on each side

9:16 - Brand new - Sunlite P/N 1915 - Loose Ball Bearings 1/4 inch 144 pcs / bag 72774 01915 - Dist J&B Importers, Miami, Fl

9:20 - grease gun with marine grease
9:49 - insert bearing with tweezers
10:10 - both cups filled with marine grease plus 11 new ball bearings each
10:18 - Drive Side - put marine grease on threads of the cup - seals bottom bracket
10:44 - by hand - screw fixed cup to the right
11:03 - use Park Tool HCW4 Wrench -
11:11 - tighten by tapping with mallet
11:33 - Non Drive Side - thin coating of grease around the races and on the axle
12:00 - put Long Side of axle in 1st to be on the drive side
12:05 - slide axle into shell
12:18 - add thin coating of grease to outer threads
12:32 - insert by hand - turn to the right carefully until it hits the bearings
12:50 - want it tight enough so you don't get play on the axle but the axle turns smoothly
13:04 - the axle turns smoothly - no play on there
13:10 - add locknut lockring - thread to the right - finger tight
13:34 - adjust axle turn nice and smoothly without play
13:49 - tighten lockring - see how it feels
14:01 - turn axle - make sure there is no play there
14:14 - make it slightly tighter - loosen lockring -
14:21 - tighten adjustable cup just a touch -- feel the axle - go just a little bit more - feel it
14:39 - tighten lockring
14:50 - see how it feels turning the axle - turns smooth - no play - feels good
15:00 - check lockring is good and tight

15:20 - Cotter pins = 9mm diameter - need to file bevel down to match the bevel of the pins that were in there
15:56 - filing bevel on cotter pin
17:20 - installing cotter pins
17:36 - insert cotter pin facing up into the flat part of the axle - line it up / slide it in
17:50 - tap in cotter pin
17:56 - add washer and nut - tighten with wrench
18:16 - Do not use the nut to draw it through - only want to use the nut to lock the pin in
18:26 - tap the pin - use the hammer to tap the pin in some more
18:36 - tighten the nut down again - tape the pin - tighten the nut
18:40 - keep doing this until the nut doesn't come loose again - you know the pin is all the way in

19:05 - put the chain around the bottom bracket
19:10 - put the crank arm on
19:16 - drive side crank = up with non drive side crank down
19:26 - grease the pin and threads
19:34 - linsert Pin with flat part facing down add washer and nut

20:20 - repeat process of tapping in pin after first 50 miles of riding - so nut doesn not come loose
20:46 - remount chain onto crank rings

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Old 05-22-24, 09:00 PM
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Originally Posted by Liquidfusion
Hi - can you describe what you're doing with the U08 bottom bracket? Cleaning - Repacking the grease - new ball bearings? Spingle? Shell? Cups? Thanks.
Here's Rusty's thread: Vintage Peugeot
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Old 05-22-24, 09:06 PM
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Originally Posted by Liquidfusion
To keep cost down, can you have a 27" wheel and a 700c wheel on the same bike? The 700c has a flywheel I added to it.

Reading it's best to keep wheels same type for both - so using the 700c Compagnola - I need to buy a 700c for the front wheel. What do you prefer / recommend?
You can use both a 700c and 27 inch wheel, although that is not ideal. Doesn't matter which is front or back.

as for a replacement 700c wheel to match the Campagnolo rear, you could watch eBay for another Campa wheel, or ask here in the forum for something suitable. There are a lot of posters here who have tooo muuuuch stuuuff and might be willing to help you out.
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Old 05-23-24, 06:02 AM
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You don’t need another Campy wheel to match what you have: the Campagnolo part refers to the hub. Campy stuff can get expensive.

It looks from the photo the 700c wheel you have is a rear so get a front 700c wheel and you’ll have good choices for tires both cheap and expensive.

Luckily the brakes on these Peugeots have enough adjustment to work with both 700c and 27” wheels.
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Old 05-25-24, 09:23 PM
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Originally Posted by markk900
You don’t need another Campy wheel to match what you have: the Campagnolo part refers to the hub. Campy stuff can get expensive.
It looks from the photo the 700c wheel you have is a rear so get a front 700c wheel and you’ll have good choices for tires both cheap and expensive.
Luckily the brakes on these Peugeots have enough adjustment to work with both 700c and 27” wheels.
- What 700C front wheel is low cost and good quality? Do you have to spent $$$ for quality?
- NYC good to have removable wheel? Or do I just put a chain around the frame - the front wheel - the rear wheel too?
- Will be riding pavement roads through / around Central Park + NYC streets + maybe smooth the path by the Hudson River 96th to 125th
- Future goals - ride over and up into the NJ Palisades across the GWB and back

What about the gears? Any good videos to watch about repairing these? Thanks

Last edited by Liquidfusion; 05-25-24 at 09:27 PM.
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