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2024 Getting My Peugeot Ready to Ride

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2024 Getting My Peugeot Ready to Ride

Old 05-20-24, 10:45 PM
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2024 Getting My Peugeot Ready to Ride

Getting ready to make my Peugeot ready to ride. Gears need work plus new handlebar tape. Have extra derailleurs I bought that are sitting on the shelf. Do I install them, or is it best to have a bike repair store do the work?




Last edited by Liquidfusion; 05-25-24 at 09:38 PM.
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Old 05-20-24, 10:54 PM
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Believe you answered your own question. If not familiar with derailleurs mechanics, for an amateur it can be frustrating. Or you could give it a shot and watch the Part Tools YouTube videos, which are excellent, for some pointers and if that doesn’t work out, take it to the bike shop.
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Old 05-20-24, 11:25 PM
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Originally Posted by rsbob
Believe you answered your own question. If not familiar with derailleurs mechanics, for an amateur it can be frustrating. Or you could give it a shot and watch the Part Tools YouTube videos, which are excellent, for some pointers and if that doesn’t work out, take it to the bike shop.
Thanks - will watch Part Tools YouTube videos just so I know more of what is going on there - how come my posted photos are huge?

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Old 05-20-24, 11:28 PM
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Photos of the derailleur gears I have - SunTour derailleur seems bent - it this normal?

SunTour vs SunTour Cyclone - which is better? Are these good choices? NYC streets.

What brand tires do you recommend? I'm in my 60's. 220 lbs. Is this too heavy for this bike? Plan to ride and lose weight!!

If I go to a bike repair place, It's good to be prepared so as to not get ripped off. Thanks.








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Old 05-21-24, 02:27 AM
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Hanger on the Suntour VX is certainly bent, but can be replaced. The cyclone is the better derailleur assuming it’s in good shape. May need a hanger as well depending on your dropouts. It’s Park Tool, if you’re looking for videos. More modern than vintage oriented but the basics of derailleur setup will still apply.

Mechanics are used to hearing their advice countered with “well, I read on the internet…” so make sure you know what you’re talking about if you’re arguing with advice given, or find another shop if you feel you’re getting ripped off.
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Old 05-21-24, 03:17 AM
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Originally Posted by Liquidfusion
Thanks - will watch Part Tools YouTube videos just so I know more of what is going on there - how come my posted photos are huge?
I think he meant ParK Tools.

I recommend a new saddle to match the bar tape.
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Old 05-21-24, 05:38 AM
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Beausage in abundance! Panaracer Pasela would be an appropriate tire. I'd rethink the "If I go to a bike repair place, It's good to be prepared so as to not get ripped off" attitude. Not every shop will want to work on it.
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Old 05-21-24, 05:51 AM
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If you're riding in NYC streets, I'd recommend Schwalbe Marathon green guard tires (they come in 27 inch if that is your wheel size).

You'd be better off posting in the C and V forum since folks there have a lot of experience rebuilding old bikes.

This is a Peugeot UO 8 from the 70s by the looks of it. It is a fine platform for a commuter/street bike as it has a well thought out stable geometry and clearance for reasonably large volume tires (it came stock with 27 and 1/4 tires with room for fenders).

The bike has been modified from the original spec. The mafac racers are likely original to the bike and they're fine centerpull brakes. You will need new brake pads and you'll have to do a bit of research to figure out what works with those brakes. The suntour derailleurs are an upgrade over the original simplex ones. It looks like the cottered crank has been replaced by a cotterless one. This is a sturdy bike.
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Old 05-21-24, 08:51 AM
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Originally Posted by Liquidfusion
Getting ready to make my Peugeot ready to ride. Gears need work plus new handlebar tape. Have extra derailleurs I bought that are sitting on the shelf. Do I install them, or is it best to have a bike repair store do the work?






Interesting mix of parts on that bike ! That era Peugeot usually came with Simplex parts and either some basic cottered crank or higher level Stronglight.... Also the Track Bars are an interesting replacement - prolly owner decided to 'Look Fast' on his ride through Central Park... LOL Definitely not the best for all round road riding, since theye're designed to be ridden 100% from the drops... LOL!
You missed the pic of the Reymolds sticker... on seattube just under the seatpost cluster - would be interesting to see which Tubeset it's made from...
It does look like bike has a Cotterless Crank - side view shot might show which Brand/Model...
REALLY IMPORTANT for repair and replacement... : This Bike will be using 'FRENCH THREADING' on the bottom bracket and the rear wheel - freewheel Thread - DO NOT uSE ANYHTING OTHER THAN FRENCH THREAD !!! on Bottom Bracket Cups! If a french rear wheel like Normandy , ONLY FRENCH THREAD freewheel !!!
Odd that the Front has a Quick Release Hub/wheel and the rear is Just Bolt-on... WHeels may each still have their maker name in a label on the hub - would be good to know...
If you get a replacement rear wheel - should be 120 width...
Also the Pic of the 'wheel' - my guess this Wheel - prolly the front wheel - is a tubular/sewup rim/tire.... NOT clincher...
The rear wheel very likely is a 'clincher' & steel... bikes of that era - Alloy wheels with Quick Release = Tubular = 700c, Steel with axle nuts = Clincher = 27 1/4 (shorten to '27' in spoken usage)
VX of Cyclone rear Derailleur - one in the same - Cyclone was higher level series and a few years newer. VX = great RD ! Cyclone also great
Both are Short Cage and are limited on overall combos of From rings and rear Cassette - usually with a 52/42 front combo the largest rear woeable rear cog is 25....
You'll want some very bike specific tools to really work on EVERYTHING - like a BB wrench...
Remember : FRENCH THREADING !
Have Fun , Good Luck !
Ride On
Yuri

EDIT: The Derailleur hanger should screw off the Derailleur - 6mm . A simple part found in very old bike shops...
BUT the hanger is mild steel - if you have an anvil or similar hard flat surface, you can Hammer the Hanger Flat - perfectly flat !
the Screw in the collar near the Derailleur bolt which threads on the Hanger - that screw should HIT the back of the hanger and is used to adjust the angle of the Derailleur - relative to the angle of the freewheel cogs. The Derailleur SHOUDL BE TIGHT/not moveable once properly mounted (and adjusted before fully tightening). SHimano Derailleurs pivoted, Suntour Derailleurs did not pivot, were fixed ...
For more info - post in the C & V forum...

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Old 05-21-24, 09:15 AM
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Unless you have a lot of time, I'd outsource that to the bike shop. Let someone who knows what he's doing go over it. He may find other things that you have not considered. For example, your original post didn't mention the tires, but they obviously need to be replaced. How about bearings? Cable housings? Brake pads? Frayed cable ends, etc.

Treat yourself.

On the other hand, if you're retired and have time, tools and a good bike mechanics book maybe it would be a fun project?
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Old 05-21-24, 09:44 AM
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Originally Posted by cyclezen
Interesting mix of parts on that bike ! That era Peugeot usually came with Simplex parts and either some basic cottered crank or higher level Stronglight.... Also the Track Bars are an interesting replacement - prolly owner decided to 'Look Fast' on his ride through Central Park... LOL Definitely not the best for all round road riding, since they're designed to be ridden 100% from the drops... LOL!
HiI!! Super thanks. Will read and reread your post plus insights from others here. Wow. Great insights!! This bike was a gift from a friend who's son added the Bullhorn handlebars, plus used various parts to rebuild this bike.

Are the handgrips in the right place? Adding pics of the bike frame. Didn't see a Reynolds Sticker.


Last edited by Liquidfusion; 05-25-24 at 09:35 PM.
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Old 05-21-24, 09:57 AM
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It's a bicycle. It's not rocket science. I can never understand why posters here keep telling people to 'take it to the bike shop'. The OP would end up spending way more money than the bike is worth. AND there is no guarantee that the random mechanic at the bike shop would know one darn thing about French threaded freewheels and simplex derailleurs.
Move this thread to the C&V section where there is a far more supportive audience for this kind of endeavor.
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Old 05-21-24, 09:58 AM
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Originally Posted by shelbyfv
Beausage in abundance! Panaracer Pasela would be an appropriate tire. I'd rethink the "If I go to a bike repair place, It's good to be prepared so as to not get ripped off" attitude. Not every shop will want to work on it.
True not every shop will want to work on it - but I can learn about this bike here and what it will take to get it back into good riding shape. I believe the people here are honest and know what they are talking about.

60's Retired - working on music goals. Realize there might be a limit to what I can do in an apartment. I love to rebuild and create. DIY. Will be on a more solid footing from what I read here, Thanks.

Last edited by Liquidfusion; 05-21-24 at 10:09 AM.
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Old 05-21-24, 10:07 AM
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Originally Posted by Liquidfusion
True not every shop will want to work on it - but I can learn about this bike here and what it will take to get it back into good riding shape. I believe the people here are honest and know what they are talking about.

60's Retired - working on music goals. Realize there might be a limit to what I can do in an apartment. I love to rebuild and create. DIY. Will be on a smore solid footing from what I read here, Thanks.
You can get this roadworthy in a NYC apt. Plus if there is a bike coop that you can get to, they usually have space for people to work on bikes. No idea whether that is possible in NYC though. This is a very doable DIY project.
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Old 05-21-24, 10:09 AM
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Originally Posted by icemilkcoffee
It's a bicycle. It's not rocket science. I can never understand why posters here keep telling people to 'take it to the bike shop'. The OP would end up spending way more money than the bike is worth. AND there is no guarantee that the random mechanic at the bike shop would know one darn thing about French threaded freewheels and simplex derailleurs.
Move this thread to the C&V section where there is a far more supportive audience for this kind of endeavor.
Thank you!! How do I move the tread to the C&V section?
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Old 05-21-24, 10:10 AM
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Liquidfusion, the UO-8 Peugeots (like yours) are very popular here and are easy to set up for riding in all sorts of conditions. You've made a good start by getting the Suntour derailleurs; those were the best working derailleurs available in the early 70s. What I suggest first is that you clean the bike as best as possible, and then take pictures of the drive side (the side showing the derailleurs and crank) so we can assess what you will need to do (or might want to do). Also, we need better pics of the wheels and hubs. If the wheels are steel, that will limit what you may want to do with the bike.
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Old 05-21-24, 10:15 AM
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Originally Posted by Aubergine
Liquidfusion, the UO-8 Peugeots (like yours) are very popular here and are easy to set up for riding in all sorts of conditions. You've made a good start by getting the Suntour derailleurs; those were the best working derailleurs available in the early 70s. What I suggest first is that you clean the bike as best as possible, and then take pictures of the drive side (the side showing the derailleurs and crank) so we can assess what you will need to do (or might want to do). Also, we need better pics of the wheels and hubs. If the wheels are steel, that will limit what you may want to do with the bike.
Will get on this - what do you recommend to clean the bike? WD40?
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Old 05-21-24, 10:17 AM
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Originally Posted by Liquidfusion
Thank you!! How do I move the tread to the C&V section?
I'll take it there, give me a minute.
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Old 05-21-24, 10:20 AM
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Originally Posted by Liquidfusion
Will get on this - what do you recommend to clean the bike? WD40?
Soap (people seem to like Dawn dish soap) and water work well for most bits. For the chain, I suggest you get a chain tool so you can remove it and then toss it. You'll want to replace it with a new chain anyway. This is an example of a chain tool: https://www.ebay.com/itm/33316016221...mis&media=COPY

There are cheaper tools available, or a shop can remove it in seconds if that is your choice.
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Old 05-21-24, 10:23 AM
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Originally Posted by icemilkcoffee
...I can never understand why posters here keep telling people to 'take it to the bike shop'...

Don't be afraid, ya got this...

In many ways you need to make up your mind if you are going for a Wall Hanger, a Restore, or a RIDE... I think this is the perfect bike to learn new skills. And this model of Peugeot has a ride beyond reproach. You have multiple tools in your pocket already. Of course you will need a few bicycle specific tools. But really they are not that many and not proprietary.

https://www.youtube.com/c/RJTheBikeGuy/videos
https://www.sheldonbrown.com/
https://www.bikeforums.net

When you get to your wheels be sure to get some PB Blaster or ATF on those nipples a few days before trying to move them. Your brakes need new cables and housings and pads. I would use Generic Koolstop type pads.
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Old 05-21-24, 10:48 AM
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Well, he can do it in a NYC apartment, but he may need to spend as much on tools and then take months more to git 'er done.
Rather than supporting a local mechanic.
No, it's not rocket science, but that bit about French threads is a prime example of something a newbie would overlook that a pro would already know.
I guess it depends on whether you want to ride it sooner or do the work yourself.
It seems like you've got the full support of a couple guys here, which should be a big help.
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Old 05-21-24, 10:48 AM
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Originally Posted by zandoval

Don't be afraid, ya got this...

[size=13px]
[/size]Yep.

Vintage bikes are, at base, pretty simple machines. To be sure, there are things one needs to know about them, and there are tricks and tips that make restoring a bike easier. But you'll learn them here as you go along.
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Old 05-21-24, 10:55 AM
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Originally Posted by Liquidfusion
Will get on this - what do you recommend to clean the bike? WD40?
Yes, as noted likely a U08 - and C - V will be helpful...
clean with whatever, but I recommend 'cleaners' not containing 'solvents' - they may damage some of the old cosmetics. It's ok to have cracked, aging cosmetics, labels.
It was a classic 'everyday', entry level kinda 10 spd from the early 70's... a very nice ride... Ride it in Central Park and you'll gather a bunch of older riders/racers...
... may even be a 'Chick Magnet'... LOL!
Consider replacing the rear wheel with a better one with Quick Release - and if so, make it an 'English Thread' hub/wheel - you'll have much selection in replacement for the freewheel....
and replacing the handlebars with a more street oriented one, which allows more hand positions and better reach to the brake levers.
Ride On
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Old 05-21-24, 10:55 AM
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Originally Posted by Smaug1
No, it's not rocket science, but that bit about French threads is a prime example of something a newbie would overlook that a pro would already know.
This always irritates me (not poking at you, Smaug, but at the overall assumption about French standards). Every bike has things that a newbie would not know, such as the reverse threading on one cup of an English bottom bracket or on the off side pedal. It's frankly easy to learn about what French bikes need in about ten minutes, if that.
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Old 05-21-24, 06:28 PM
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Here are photos of the drive side


Last edited by Liquidfusion; 05-25-24 at 09:33 PM.
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