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Stuck Seatpost Removed... Now What

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Stuck Seatpost Removed... Now What

Old 07-08-24, 05:02 PM
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Stuck Seatpost Removed... Now What

Picked up a lovely Bob Jackson touring bike back in May that had probably been stored for a number of years. Been making some small tweaks to prepare it for a tour when I noticed that the Campy NR post, while not stuck solid, would rotate and with lots of force move about a cm vertically. I tried a number of tactics to pull it out solo before I decided to take it to a shop and let them do it. Good news is they got the post out without destroying it or the seat tube. My plan going in was to replace the post. Having read Sheldon's notes on aluminum oxide and how it causes the post to swell, I didn't think it would come out in decent shape. Surprisingly the post escaped without being aesthetically marred alright though checking the diameter with my calipers, it varies from 27.15 at the top to 27.4 is areas where is was stuck in the seat tube. Still planning to replace it but anyone had experience successfully reusing a formerly pesky post?
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Old 07-08-24, 05:55 PM
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I had a white Kestrel EMS frame with a frozen American Classic seatpost that had been like that for a decade. Carbon frame with an aluminum seat tube insert that had oxidized with the seatpost stuck in place.

This one was tricky. I didn't want to damage the carbon frame or the insert, so gentle persuasion was necessary.

I applied Kroil all around the seat tube cluster, tapped a rubber mallet on each side of a beater saddle attached to the post, and repeated a million times. It eventually freed.

The seatpost was really none the worse for wear. Once the oxidation was buffed out, it was fine.
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Old 07-08-24, 08:40 PM
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I wouldn't hesitate a millisecond on reusing it. Polish it with a file and 600 grit. Try fitting it occasionally between sanding sessions. Finish with Mother's for that mirror-like shine. Pull it out of the frame once a year and relube, just as you do your stem.
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Old 07-09-24, 07:10 AM
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Fortunately I’ve been able to free up a stuck seat post but it took a while . Where I live it is arid so if I coat the post with a thin layer of grease after polish it stays good . After adjusted to the proper height I just wipe the excess. I use Mothers as SurferRosa suggests.
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Old 07-09-24, 08:12 AM
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Why would you hesitate to use it again? Just clean it up (smooth sand and polish) and also clean out the seat tube. A thin layer of grease and carry on.
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Old 07-09-24, 08:37 AM
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As others have mentioned, a little sanding will clean up the post. It will be ready for another 40 years of service. The easy way to clean out the seat tube is with a flex-hone attached to an electric drill.
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Old 07-09-24, 09:01 AM
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I'm redoing a lotus eclair that seems to have been in storage for decades (lots of "shelf" wear). There is always a moment of trepidation when you release the seatpost bolt and get to see what you are dealing with. Fortunately after a bit of initial struggle it let go and I was able to see the trace of old grease on the post.

Thank God for people that grease their seatposts and stems.
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Old 07-09-24, 09:24 AM
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Originally Posted by obrentharris
As others have mentioned, a little sanding will clean up the post. It will be ready for another 40 years of service. The easy way to clean out the seat tube is with a flex-hone attached to an electric drill.
Brent
Plus one on this. Absolutely a necessity whether it is a flapper sander piece or a flex hone.

What I always wonder about is the corrosion at the bottom of seatposts, that wrinkly mess and pock marks.
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Old 07-09-24, 10:58 AM
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Thanks everyone! I'll look into getting a flex hone for the seat tube and start sanding/polishing the post. That's much better than the cost of replacment.
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Old 07-09-24, 12:06 PM
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Originally Posted by abdon
I'm redoing a lotus eclair that seems to have been in storage for decades (lots of "shelf" wear). There is always a moment of trepidation when you release the seatpost bolt and get to see what you are dealing with. Fortunately after a bit of initial struggle it let go and I was able to see the trace of old grease on the post.

Thank God for people that grease their seatposts and stems.
The previous owner (a forum member) was quite good about lubing everything... I purchased a couple complete bikes and a project from them. However, with health issues and the daunting size of their collection it's easy to understand how one might get behind on some of those annual tasks. I have zero regrets and am looking forward to getting it out on a tour later this summer.
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Old 07-09-24, 12:12 PM
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Annual lubing!!??
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Old 07-09-24, 03:18 PM
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RJ the bike guy has a diy seat post hone tool using nothing but a steel wool and a metal coat-hanger.
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Old 07-09-24, 04:57 PM
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I've done the steel wool and coat hanger trick and it worked great for me. If you don't have steel wool, balling up tin foil works in a pinch, too.
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Old 07-09-24, 05:38 PM
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Originally Posted by SurferRosa
I wouldn't hesitate a millisecond on reusing it. Polish it with a file and 600 grit. Try fitting it occasionally between sanding sessions. Finish with Mother's for that mirror-like shine. Pull it out of the frame once a year and relube, just as you do your stem.
Originally Posted by SJX426
Annual lubing!!??
I lube my posts each year if ... I do major position changes, get that post I really wanted or paint the frame. Small chance it will get lubed if I'm just boxing the bike.

I just put them in with plenty of Phi Wood green or (better but more work to pull out) marine grease. Good chance I've had seatposts that have stayed in, undisturbed, for 10-15 years. Don't remember the last time I had an issue pulling one out. Now, my salt road winters of Ann Arbor and Boston probably wouldn't have given me that grace time but I cannot imagine those bikes going 10 of those winters without a need to strip the bike and hence, pull the post out anyways.
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Old 07-10-24, 03:03 PM
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Originally Posted by obrentharris
The easy way to clean out the seat tube is with a flex-hone attached to an electric drill.
Brent
Worthwhile to mention is that you'll want to do this with the bottom bracket removed or the frame upside down to avoid contaminating the bb bearing grease.
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