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brakes?

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Old 10-16-05, 02:29 PM
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jmoule
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brakes?

over the winter, one of the projects I have in mind for my bike is replacing the brake calipers. It's an old colnago, most likely at 1978-82 era Super.

My question is, what can I use? do I need long reach brakes? and what are some modern calipers I can use? anything I should look out for or keep in mind?

sorry, I'm not doing a true restoration job on this bike. I ride it a lot and want modern brake components. I think they stop bikes better and I like being able to adjust the pads without bending things.

currently, the bike has Dia Compe brakes on it. as far as what model, all I have to go by is the G on one side of the arms.

any help would be appreciated. thanks!
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Old 10-16-05, 04:36 PM
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I am currently wrapping up what has turned into a year-long project with a Super of this vintage. I put short-reach campy brakes on mine and find that the pads are nearly at the top of their travel. At least this bike is very very tight. Dunno if they all were, but I'd guess probably. Mine has a serial number on the right-side rear dropout face (C255). Does yours? What is it? Can you post some pics?
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Old 10-16-05, 04:52 PM
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my serial number is 80.
I posted some pics a while ago trying to figure out what model I have. here's the thread:
http://www.bikeforums.net/showthread.php?t=120314

Thanks for the input. I'll definitely keep that in mind as I go about this.
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Old 10-16-05, 05:23 PM
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oh yeah. I remember now. I see we are progressing at about the same speed. (well, I almost have mine sorted out...so maybe I can post some pics soon.) Mine had chrome forks and stays, at one point. It has been repainted several times and most of the chrome was failing anyway, so it has no chrome any more...
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Old 10-16-05, 06:04 PM
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John E
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I have period-correct Campag. sidepull calipers on my 1981 Bianchi, and they look alot better than they work, even with KoolStop salmon pads.
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Old 10-16-05, 06:40 PM
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If the current brakes have recessed allen key bolts then they are short reach and you can go to modern dual pivot brakes with minimal fuss though there's one thing to keep in mind: Modern Campy brakes have the quick release in the handle not on the calipers so to do Campy right you'll need levers too. New ones are ultra pricey and older ones take a little patience on eBay. If you're doing functional upgrades and not worried about collectibility (brakes can always be swapped back anyways) I, hesitantly, recommend the "other" brand or big bucks for Mavic SSCs (I can't believe I said that )

If you currently have long reach brakes (visible nuts on bridge and back of forks) you still have options. There are modern long reach brakes. Tectro brand and Shimanos equivalent to Ultegras. They're set up for recessed bolts but Sheldon Brown has instructions for making them fit. Check out the Harris Cyclery site. When you find brakes there should be a link to Brown's directions.

sheldonbrown.com

BTW my original Campy SR calipers for my vintage Basso are safely stored in their box and I use modern DP Records. I had some Chorus levers to get around the QR issue.

Good luck


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Old 10-16-05, 08:51 PM
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any way to measure to determine the reach?

my dia compes have a nut at the front of the brakes that goes through the bridge and is held on the back by a locknut. but looking at my brother's 3 year old trek, I could see how I may be able to make an allen bolt system work.

I'll be honest and say I'm not really considering campy as an option. too much $$. I would consider mavic, cane creek and others, however. as long as they work well and won't break the bank. I'm wary of tectro, as I've been told they aren't as stiff as the shimano calipers. and rigidity is part of the reason I am looking at new brakes as opposed to vintage.

thanks for all the help so far. this is the information I really do need to make the right choice for my bike.
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Old 10-17-05, 05:51 PM
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There are measurements but I don't recall right away. However I do have the link for you.

http://sheldonbrown.com/gloss_r.html#recessed

I have no experience with the Tectros and haven't heard much either. However, if the Campy makes you gunshy (and the Centaurs I use on a modern bike are pretty reasonably priced) you don't want to look at the SSCs or the better Cane Creeks. Shimano 105 or Ultegra will suit your bill and not take your breath away.

eBay is always an option too.


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Old 10-18-05, 06:26 AM
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Originally Posted by Walter
...) I, hesitantly, recommend the "other" brand or big bucks for Mavic SSCs (I can't believe I said that ) . . .

Walter, what's wrong with recommending Modolo?
that is the other brake, right?

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Old 10-18-05, 07:17 PM
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Well duh!

I'm grateful you didn't ban me for my gratuitous use of the "S" word around here.

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Old 10-18-05, 09:08 PM
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I just installed a pair of Nashbar long reach (aka Tektro long reach) brakes on my Schwinn. Huge improvement over the centerpull Dia-Compes that I had on it (of course anything would have been an improvement over those). I know there are some Cane Creek products are rebadged Tektro products as well. I have been very happy with my Tektro R200A brake levers with built in quick release - a Campy design. The Cane Creek levers are the same things, only often about $5-$8 more. And on the topic of making the recessed allen key fit older frames, I drilled out the back side of my fork to fit the front allen key bolt. On the backside I drilled from the backside all the way through and used one of the concave washers that had been on the center pull brakes between the caliper and the bridge to correct for the bigger hole on that side. Hope that made sense.

I haven't had enough time to really test out the Nashbar/Tektro brakes but the 4 mile ride I did test them on I was quite happy with them. I'll probably invest in some better brake pads, but the responsiveness of the calipers were very firm and positive. Good brake cables also help ensure that your brakes are responsive and powerful. Each time I buy brake cables I seem to buy the next better / heavier one and each time I'm impressed on the positive effect on braking.
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Old 10-20-05, 12:52 PM
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well, the dia compe levers I have are perfectly fine. it's the calipers I want to ditch. of course, I'm not putting new brakes on the front until I replace the chewed up sew-up rim (there are seriously deep gouges in the metal) there with a nice new Mavic Open Pro clincher rim.
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Old 10-20-05, 04:03 PM
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Hey, do any of you know what the purpose/name for the "inverted flared triangular tabs" which are sometimes attached to arms of older sidepulls is?
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Old 10-20-05, 05:46 PM
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Aid in guiding the wheel back into the fork or frame. Guides tire between pads as you raise it into place. Makes for faster tire changes during pit stops.
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Old 10-21-05, 06:55 AM
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Originally Posted by takara14
Aid in guiding the wheel back into the fork or frame. Guides tire between pads as you raise it into place. Makes for faster tire changes during pit stops.
Mark yet another thing off of the list of things I always wondered about! Learned something new at 8am on a Friday morning. That doesn't happen very often. Does make sense though I suppose.

Speaking of brakes, anyone know of a long reach caliper that can match the reach of the old centerpull brakes? The Schwinn Approved (Dia-Compe) centerpulls that were on my Schwinn could be adjusted enough to mount a 700c wheel, yet the 'Long Reach' Tektro dual pivots I just put on have to be adjusted to the very end to accept the standard 27". *humph* Not sure if I want to go the 700c route any time real soon, but it would be nice to know I could (short of using drop bolts @ $45 ea!)

/end mini-threadjack.
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