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Show us your mixte (mhendricks' new happy place)

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Show us your mixte (mhendricks' new happy place)

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Old 05-17-18, 10:40 AM
  #1301  
PugRider
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Univega Sportour Mixte by Eat More Plants1, on Flickr


Univega Sportour Mixte by Eat More Plants1, on Flickr


Univega Sportour Mixte by Eat More Plants1, on Flickr


Univega Sportour Mixte by Eat More Plants1, on Flickr


Univega Sportour Mixte by Eat More Plants1, on Flickr
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Old 05-17-18, 12:08 PM
  #1302  
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The blue Sport Tour in the above post looks like the sweetest of rides! Well done on the restoration!!!

I'm in the middle of building up my second Univega mixte. I have to agree on the underlying quality! (I have an '82 Viva Sport and am working on an '83 Gran Tourismo.) The bottom bracket grease on the Viva Sport was like tan-colored gravel and the bearings were un-salvageable. On the other hand, the 7 speed free-hub with the Shimano 600 derailleur and indexed shifters worked flawlessly - until the 35 year old plastic housing on the shift levers crumbled away. I'm back to Suntour Superbe friction shifters on the center downtube braze-on and all's well again

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Old 05-17-18, 12:17 PM
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Originally Posted by thumpism View Post
If you're feeling energetic you could search here for a brochure that shows your bike. Lots of info and groovy pix.

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Thanks, i checked allot. Miss is around 1988 BUT non of the ones i seen are Mixte
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Old 05-17-18, 02:25 PM
  #1304  
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Originally Posted by Honusms View Post
The blue Sport Tour in the above post looks like the sweetest of rides! Well done on the restoration!!!

I'm in the middle of building up my second Univega mixte. I have to agree on the underlying quality! (I have an '82 Viva Sport and am working on an '83 Gran Tourismo.) The bottom bracket grease on the Viva Sport was like tan-colored gravel and the bearings were un-salvageable. On the other hand, the 7 speed free-hub with the Shimano 600 derailleur and indexed shifters worked flawlessly - until the 35 year old plastic housing on the shift levers crumbled away. I'm back to Suntour Superbe friction shifters on the center downtube braze-on and all's well again
Why thank you, it was a real pleasure. I've gone down the rabbit hole with so many bikes with bad this, stuck this or that, rusted here and there, missing whatever, I feel like this was the universe giving back. Although my wife's Univega mixte, which is an older, lower-end model, was just as easy to work on (although it needed a more thorough going-through) and is also a sublime ride (at her request I've upgraded to a full indexed system since this pic).


DSC_3895 by Eat More Plants1, on Flickr
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Old 05-19-18, 06:27 AM
  #1305  
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https://www.bikeforums.net/classic-v...ane-worth.html
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Old 05-25-18, 03:02 PM
  #1306  
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Univega Contrast

I adore mixtes! And now I have 2 by Univega. The blue 1982 Viva Sport has double-butted chromalloy tubing, a downtube shifter braze-on and a quick, responsive ride. Right now it has an 8 speed Campy drive train that really moves it down the road. Compare it with my 1983 Gran Turismo. Still double-butted chromally tubing, but in a much more relaxed configuration. This one’s very smooth and comfy. It has the Suntour 14/34 freewheel paired with a Sugino VT triple crankset, which is close to the original configuration. There are braze-ones for both downtube shifters and cantilever brakes. So here are two mixtes from the same manufacturer from the same time period, but with very different “personalities”.





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Old 05-25-18, 04:42 PM
  #1307  
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2017 Chapman


02 Chapman by iabisdb, on Flickr
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Old 06-13-18, 11:37 AM
  #1308  
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From Paris:
An “M. Vasselle” model, for which I have been able to find no info whatever.



Special C.N.C.:



A Jacques Anquetil swoopy:


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Old 07-08-18, 03:57 PM
  #1309  
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Hey friends, close to joining you. Gonna touch up paint, and do an upright 1x setup. Super excited!


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Old 08-17-18, 11:46 PM
  #1310  
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Little tough guy!

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Old 10-21-18, 06:56 PM
  #1311  
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Another project underway.
1984 (or earlier) JC Penney Echelon mixte. Looks like it was made by Huffy. The components were stripped at the local bike coop. The frame & fork were headed for the scrap metal bin. My plans are to make it into a single speed beach cruiser. Coaster brake, alloy rims, widest tires I can fit.

A couple quick notes. An unusual seat post and fixing bolt The seat post is C-shaped aluminum with a slot machined out the entire length. A nut rides inside the slot and the bolt sticks out the backside of the seat tube. A steel plug was added at the top to keep the seat clamp from collapsing the post. . Pretty weak front end. Look at the last photos to see the holes in the mixte tubes just behind the head tube. Made in the USA, kinda rare for a mixte. Welded on kickstand bracket. Aero down tube. Several bike and part companies jumped on the aero wagon in prep for the 1984 Olympics and Huffy got in on that with the Aerowind 10 speed bike. 2 or 3 serial numbers? The big stores like Sears would have numbers that indicated the supplier, a model number and a serial number. My guess is the number on the head tube is the serial number and the numbers on the left rear dropout are a supplier code and a model number. These would be used to properly identify the bike so correct spare parts could be sent out to uninformed consumers who could not mentally handle non-oem replacement parts. The bottom bracket shell has 4 holes punched for the seat tube, downtube and chain stays. No mitering needed. Just cut the tubes to approximate length and brass braze in to place. No fillet brazing, just enough to hold the tubes in place. Oh, tubes is being kind. This sort of mass market bike is made from sheet metal folded over to look like tubes. Most carbon-steel frame tubes are made using that method even on name brand bikes.

Took a bunch of before photos.


more detail photos at flickr
https://www.flickr.com/photos/rickpa...57702513643834

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Old 11-11-18, 05:16 PM
  #1312  
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Captivante Berceau

I posted the “before” pics of my 1950’s Captivante berceau mixte on the French 3-speed thread, but thought it ought to be documented here. From the catalogs on French eBay and the Tonton forum, it appears to have been a widely-available brand before it was purchased by Jeunet in the 60s. I learned a lot overhauling this one. Who knew that “wicks” (look like clothesline) were used as rim tape? Horsehair wrapped around the bottom bracket spindle would suggest a rural past. The Simplex Rigidex 35 derailleur is adjusted using 21mm spanners to move the mechanism out and back along the central bolt. The old Pullman seat is super comfy with substantial leather. The bell must have been an add-on, since it has the Peugeot lion on it. (I’ll trade to a Pug fan for a different one of the same vintage.). Springs on the underside of the fenders hold the wiring in place for the lights. It has 2 small vinyl bags for the back rack that are a bit bright and cute for my taste, but they’ll be preserved. The paint was originally “Rouge Transparant” - transparent red. It’s worn and faded to a beautiful patina - almost tan in some spots. It’s surprisingly light - frame and fork are just short of 7 pounds. It’s a very pleasant ride with its 650-B 42mm tires, 46 tooth chainring and 16-22 3 speed freewheel. I can imagine a French farm woman taking this to market. I plan to continue this application as I suspect it will be an outstanding errand bike







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Old 11-12-18, 12:38 PM
  #1313  
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Wow, that Captivante is special! I've owned a lot of mixtes - mostly French - but have never seen one as interesting as this. I'm a little envious.
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Old 11-18-18, 05:49 PM
  #1314  
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Originally Posted by rickpaulos View Post
Another project underway.
1984 (or earlier) JC Penney Echelon mixte. Looks like it was made by Huffy. The components were stripped at the local bike coop. The frame & fork were headed for the scrap metal bin. My plans are to make it into a single speed beach cruiser. Coaster brake, alloy rims, widest tires I can fit.

A couple quick notes. An unusual seat post and fixing bolt The seat post is C-shaped aluminum with a slot machined out the entire length. A nut rides inside the slot and the bolt sticks out the backside of the seat tube. A steel plug was added at the top to keep the seat clamp from collapsing the post. . Pretty weak front end. Look at the last photos to see the holes in the mixte tubes just behind the head tube. Made in the USA, kinda rare for a mixte. Welded on kickstand bracket. Aero down tube. Several bike and part companies jumped on the aero wagon in prep for the 1984 Olympics and Huffy got in on that with the Aerowind 10 speed bike. 2 or 3 serial numbers? The big stores like Sears would have numbers that indicated the supplier, a model number and a serial number. My guess is the number on the head tube is the serial number and the numbers on the left rear dropout are a supplier code and a model number. These would be used to properly identify the bike so correct spare parts could be sent out to uninformed consumers who could not mentally handle non-oem replacement parts. The bottom bracket shell has 4 holes punched for the seat tube, downtube and chain stays. No mitering needed. Just cut the tubes to approximate length and brass braze in to place. No fillet brazing, just enough to hold the tubes in place. Oh, tubes is being kind. This sort of mass market bike is made from sheet metal folded over to look like tubes. Most carbon-steel frame tubes are made using that method even on name brand bikes.

Took a bunch of before photos.


more detail photos at flickr
https://www.flickr.com/photos/rickpa...57702513643834
weeks later, done with the rebuild.
single speed coaster brake rear hub laced in to 26x1.5 aluminum mtb rims. 26x1.5 knobbs with hardly any room to spare. A smooth tread tire would fit better and ride better but I don't haven spares at the moment. I painted the sprocket with some left over copper/gold paint. . The purple crank, purple sprocket guard, and purple handle bars are from a donor bike. The splash painted stem was from another donor bike. After the first test ride, I changed the 16t for a 18t cog. That should suit some pre-teen better. The bike is going to the local Marine Corps Toys for Tots annual Christmas giveaway in a couple weeks. The bike rides like a cruiser, long and low with a relaxed front end.





@#$%! that evil white stuff in the background.
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Old 11-21-18, 01:10 PM
  #1315  
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Just brought this Peugeot mixte back from the Bike Exchange last weekend for some love.

Looks to be late 60's . At first glance the paint is pretty good.


Weight as delivered ie just shy of 30 lbs with the cottered cranks and steel wheels.

With new alu wheels and a new square taper crank I should get the weight down to 28 lbs or less


I currently have the frame stripped and am starting the cleaning process

1 wipe down with simple green

2 wipe down with paint thinner to get the caked on grease off

3 rub paint with white polishing compound

4 treat rusted areas with naval jelly ( I have found that naval jelly does not react with paiont so it is possible to paint the entire frame with it to get all or most of the rust off.

5 any areas that are badly rusted and the navel jelly doesn't get off are scrapped with the edge of a razor blade to cut through the rust crust then treated again.

6 Clean old clear lacquer off chrome forks with acetone

7 If necessary paint bare metal with rustoleum primer ( spray from can onto a flat surface then daub on the bike with a brush )

At this point I will probably lightly sand the frame with 1000 grit wet/dry paper then spray a Rustoleum clear lacquer top coat on everything including the chrome
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Old 11-21-18, 01:40 PM
  #1316  
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Originally Posted by capnjonny View Post





Just brought this Peugeot mixte back from the Bike Exchange last weekend for some love.

Looks to be late 60's . At first glance the paint is pretty good.


Weight as delivered ie just shy of 30 lbs with the cottered cranks and steel wheels.

With new alu wheels and a new square taper crank I should get the weight down to 28 lbs or less


I currently have the frame stripped and am starting the cleaning process

1 wipe down with simple green

2 wipe down with paint thinner to get the caked on grease off

3 rub paint with white polishing compound

4 treat rusted areas with naval jelly ( I have found that naval jelly does not react with paiont so it is possible to paint the entire frame with it to get all or most of the rust off.

5 any areas that are badly rusted and the navel jelly doesn't get off are scrapped with the edge of a razor blade to cut through the rust crust then treated again.

6 Clean old clear lacquer off chrome forks with acetone

7 If necessary paint bare metal with rustoleum primer ( spray from can onto a flat surface then daub on the bike with a brush )

At this point I will probably lightly sand the frame with 1000 grit wet/dry paper then spray a Rustoleum clear lacquer top coat on everything including the chrome
That's pretty dang cool, I'm a sucker for any bike boom brand pre or early boom specimens.

Keep in mind that the seat, even in this state may have value.
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Old 11-26-18, 01:53 AM
  #1317  
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here are a few snaps of the bike after I rehabbed it .
Deep clean
rubbed out paint with white polishing compound,
Sprayed clear coat on frame
replaced steel wheels with alu and new tires
replaced steel crank with square tapered alu
deleted 52 tooth chain ring and front derailleur
replaced seat (new used seat taken apart and all chrome cleaned, seat vinyl cleaned and conditioned)
new used polished Pletcher rack
New used pedals
Al cables and covers replaced.
Mafac brakes replaced with polished side pulls
Weight reduced with all the substitutions from 30 lbs to 27 lbs
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Old 11-26-18, 09:09 AM
  #1318  
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Very nice rehab!! You turned a dog into a rose.
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