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'72 Campy Nuovo Record Dérailleur Rebuild Question

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'72 Campy Nuovo Record Dérailleur Rebuild Question

Old 12-01-06, 01:45 PM
  #1  
Brown Bear
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'72 Campy Nuovo Record Dérailleur Rebuild Question

Hello Fellow Bikers,

I just took apart and cleaned my '72 Campy Nuovo Record dérailleur, but am not sure how much tension the jockey pully cage needs. I gave the cage one spin, and it's pretty tight. So much so, that the chain is under too much strain for any smooth forward pedalling. Of course, I installed the cage the first time with NO spin and there was not any tension to pull the chain backwards. My thinking was one spin, but that's too much as I've said.

If anyone is familiar with the proper procedure, I'd love to know about it. Perhaps, I've got the tension spring in the lower body in the wrong position. Hmm, any help is appreciated.

Best Regards,
Jack
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Old 12-01-06, 05:52 PM
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I used a C-record for this because it was easier and lying arounf, hope you don't mind.
Assembled without the stop screw in the cage the derailleur should sit like so:


The arrow indicate the direction you should turn the cage to tension the spring.
This picture shows me holding it with one hand ready to install the stop screw:


I hope this helps,
Anthony


This should give you the right amount of tension. There is also two holes in the cage plate to allow you to select different spring tensions. If it is still too tight after doing this you could try the other one.
The above instructions should result in a half turn of the spring. Oh and I realise that on a nuovo record the stop screw doesn't actually screw into the cage plate but it should behave similarly.
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Old 12-01-06, 06:18 PM
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Thanks, Anthony, for the reply!

Hi Anthony,

Thanks for the idea of switching the holes in the lower body tension cap (part 812/A in the diagram). As you can see in my post, giving the cage one 360 degree spin counterclockwise, gives me really tight tension. I'm thinking that maybe I can switch holes like you've suggested. Also it might be that the chain is a link too short.

With the chain on the largest chainwheel and on the largest rear cog, the dérailleur is almost in a horizontal position. It's probably streched too much and what with the high tension of the lower body spring pulling on the cage and what I suspect is too short a chain, maybe there's something to invesigate.

I'll keep you posted,
Jack

P.S. Thanks for taking the time with your Photoshop drawing tool, too!
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Old 12-01-06, 06:23 PM
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Well you shouldn't be in the big ring and largest cog at the same time, but if that is the case it sounds like the chain is too short. I would say maybe you are using to big of a cog but I doubt the nuovo record would even shift into anything over say 28 teeth (if they even go that high). someone who knows more could probably help with that one but Nuovo and super record derailleurs tend to be used with no more than say a 23 or 25 tooth big cog.
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Old 12-02-06, 08:31 PM
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Mystery Solved!

Hello,

Oops, no wonder my dérailleur cage was under a load. I was using the wrong chain! It was too short. I disassembled the bike last January and threw the chain in with a bunch of other old chains I had in a bin and thought to myself, "I'll remember that it's the Regina chain." Hell if I didn't grab another chain that looked like the Regina -- but wasn't.

I feel like a bonehead, now. My jockey cage tension was correct, after all. I don't know why I've kept so many stretched chains over the years. I'm going to toss them out, so I don't get bit again.

My bad,
Jack
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Old 12-02-06, 10:54 PM
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your chain should always be the length of the big chainring, largest sprocket combinations, except in extreme situations.
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Old 12-02-06, 11:04 PM
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Originally Posted by dbakl
your chain should always be the length of the big chainring, largest sprocket combinations, except in extreme situations.
+an inch
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Old 12-03-06, 11:03 PM
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You gentlemen are correct!

Hello Fellows,

Exactly correct! The large chainwheel/cog combo has been my method for years for sizing chains. I just got lazy and didn't bother to check the chain length. I ended up ditching the old Regina and went with a SRAM PC-58 chain. Smooth as silk and the included master link is a nice feature at a good price point, too.

Thanks and safe travels,
Jack
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