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Why is it vintage tubular rims are so damn cheap?

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Why is it vintage tubular rims are so damn cheap?

Old 03-22-07, 11:57 AM
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Originally Posted by waytoomanybikes
yes as a matter of fact I do ......................
I already have an offer on it, but if it doesn't work out, I'll PM you.
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I explained that he could never pay me enough cash for the amount of work I had put into that bike and the only way to compensate me for it was to ride the hell out of it.
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Old 03-22-07, 01:30 PM
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Originally Posted by poopncow
I've had 50% success rate with the sealant (with tub'r clinchers). A big chunk of glass may still do you in. Also really messy and can take severial applications. If the stuff pisses out while you are riding, it gets everywhere.

Back on the subject of used tubular rims: the chore of having to clean off the existing glue (hey you never know how skill the last guy was and how old is the stuff) would keep me away from the used stuff. I don't want to go thru cleaning that stuff again.
I've had great luck using a commercial adhesive solvent to remove old tubular glue. It's in the paint department of your local big hardware warehouse. The stuff works like paint stripper; I dab it on thick with a cheap brush, let stand 10-30 minutes, and wipe with shop rags. I use the solvent two or three times, then use mineral spirits or lighter fluid for the final cleanup. You can get an old pair of tubie rims pristine inside an hour...

PS. Put a trash can or cardboard box under the rim. You're making runny, melted glue here...
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Old 03-22-07, 01:44 PM
  #28  
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Originally Posted by waytoomanybikes
Why on earth would you carry the sealant with you and wait for a flat to occur.

Pre-treat the tire by putting sealant into it before the flat happens. This is what I do, I have had punctures happen and seal themselves on next tire rotation.

Also, if the sealant is already in the tire if a puncture happens - it isn't going to get all over as people seem to expect.
Interesting - I would have thought the sealant would dry out uselessly if you put it into the tire long before a puncture hit. If you're saying it will stay good inside an air-filled tubular indefinitely, I'm sold on the idea.
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Old 03-22-07, 02:54 PM
  #29  
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The value of it is in putting it in the tire when you mount the tire, then just going riding.

In any event, why on earth would you complain about the "mess" made by the sealant?

You know how what we used to use as a "sealant" back in the old days?? Now that was messy.

Used to put milk inside the tires and let it curdle in the tire, that acted as a pretty good sealant. If you had a real bad blowout and destroyed a tire - you really didn't want to be around, especially if it was a hot day.
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Old 03-22-07, 04:35 PM
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Originally Posted by waytoomanybikes
In any event, why on earth would you complain about the "mess" made by the sealant?....

.
This is why, I picked up a piece of glass 10 blocks from home on a tubular clincher. walked home, and poured in the sealant and inflated IAW the instructions. The sealant pissed out the puncture, onto the newspapers that had been laid out on the floor. After repeating htis severial times, the leaking stopped, and I mounted the wheel back on the bike. the next morning, there was a patch of sealant under the bike, and the tire was flat.

Now, if this was a field repair, what is to say that the sealant won't spray all over my bike and my person?
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Old 03-22-07, 04:40 PM
  #31  
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Originally Posted by poopncow
This is why, I picked up a piece of glass 10 blocks from home on a tubular clincher. walked home, and poured in the sealant and inflated IAW the instructions. The sealant pissed out the puncture, onto the newspapers that had been laid out on the floor. After repeating htis severial times, the leaking stopped, and I mounted the wheel back on the bike. the next morning, there was a patch of sealant under the bike, and the tire was flat.

Now, if this was a field repair, what is to say that the sealant won't spray all over my bike and my person?

I get it - you don't like the product or tubulars - fine.

I'm done.
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Old 03-22-07, 04:41 PM
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Originally Posted by VoodooRada
I've had great luck using a commercial adhesive solvent to remove old tubular glue. It's in the paint department of your local big hardware warehouse. The stuff works like paint stripper; I dab it on thick with a cheap brush, let stand 10-30 minutes, and wipe with shop rags. I use the solvent two or three times, then use mineral spirits or lighter fluid for the final cleanup. You can get an old pair of tubie rims pristine inside an hour...

PS. Put a trash can or cardboard box under the rim. You're making runny, melted glue here...
Actually, I had used the gel type adhesive remover (tile glue), and have done EXACTLY as you discribed. It was very effective, but still it is a mess. esp from the nipples (from the inside). But this could be because the last owner globbed glue all over the nipple heads too.

(gloves were worn)

maybe the problem is just me
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Old 03-22-07, 04:46 PM
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Originally Posted by waytoomanybikes
I get it - you don't like the product or tubulars - fine.

I'm done.

PLease, I am sorry this came out the wrong way, just sharing my experience. Not hating on the goo, the TC'r or tubulars. again, if this came out the wrong way, I apologize
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Old 03-22-07, 04:48 PM
  #34  
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What is a "tubular clincher"? Am I missing something?
I like the idea of a sealant as a backup to my spare tire but frankly, the rarity of a tubular flat make the case for a backup option superfluous.
Can you feel the mass of the sealant as you are riding your lightweight tubular? (Something in the 240-280 gm range)
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Old 03-22-07, 05:05 PM
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Tubular clinchers are tubular construction tires with an added feature that allows them to be mounted (only) on clincher rims. they can be inflated to 160-180psi . they are not as light as tubulars
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Old 03-22-07, 05:25 PM
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Are these the same as "open tubulars"? While the tire construction is the same except for the fully enclosed tube, by mounting them on a clincher rim with the tall vertical metal extensions for the tire bead to engage you gain a good deal of weight but more importantly you lose most of the comfort and superior cornering ability of a real tubular. The tubular rims are compliant radially but stiff laterally, thus the more responsive and comfortable. Because the sidewall are more flexible due to the lack of the extra rim material they can corner unlike ANY clincher. Try it for yourself and you will become assimilated; resistance is futile.
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Old 03-22-07, 08:26 PM
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Tubular clinchers are enclosed like tubulars. An "open" tubular is just a clincher by any other name.
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Old 03-22-07, 08:51 PM
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If I may temporarily slightly skew this thread: To those of you who are riding 700c clinchers on light road bikes, going out in just the usual stripped down mode (helmet, jersey, shorts, gloves, shoes, socks, wallet and cell phone in the back pockets), what do you carry with you to handle the occasional puncture? And how?

Of course, I'm used to what it takes to fix a clincher. On both my touring bikes (Magneet - 27x1, Raleigh - 26x2.15) I carry the usual necessary stuff (tube, inflator, tyre irons, etc.) but both those bikes are my long haulers with racks, and I switch the panniers and handlebar bag between them. I've lived with the usual emergency tub setup (spare tyre strapped to the seat rails, glue in a back pocket, frame pump always on the bike - nowdays a compressed gas inflator and a couple of spare whippets in the pocket with the glue) for so long, I've got no clue how a modern cyclist handles a flat.
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Old 03-22-07, 09:40 PM
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Originally Posted by sykerocker
If I may temporarily slightly skew this thread: To those of you who are riding 700c clinchers on light road bikes, going out in just the usual stripped down mode (helmet, jersey, shorts, gloves, shoes, socks, wallet and cell phone in the back pockets), what do you carry with you to handle the occasional puncture? And how?

Of course, I'm used to what it takes to fix a clincher. On both my touring bikes (Magneet - 27x1, Raleigh - 26x2.15) I carry the usual necessary stuff (tube, inflator, tyre irons, etc.) but both those bikes are my long haulers with racks, and I switch the panniers and handlebar bag between them. I've lived with the usual emergency tub setup (spare tyre strapped to the seat rails, glue in a back pocket, frame pump always on the bike - nowdays a compressed gas inflator and a couple of spare whippets in the pocket with the glue) for so long, I've got no clue how a modern cyclist handles a flat.
Same as always: 2 tubes and tire levers under the seat, frame pump, couple of dollar bills and plastic baggie for emergency sidewall and tube repair (flat #3). I'll pass on the CO2 and stick with the pump because I've had slow leaks and needed to keep pumping to get home, and figured I'd have run out of CO2 cartridges after a while. Any they seem wasteful anyway.
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Old 03-23-07, 05:51 AM
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Thanks. Obviously logical - I've just been used to doing things one way for so many years that I wasn't able to change my thinking.
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Old 03-23-07, 08:24 AM
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Originally Posted by sykerocker
If I may temporarily slightly skew this thread: To those of you who are riding 700c clinchers on light road bikes, going out in just the usual stripped down mode (helmet, jersey, shorts, gloves, shoes, socks, wallet and cell phone in the back pockets), what do you carry with you to handle the occasional puncture? And how?

Of course, I'm used to what it takes to fix a clincher. On both my touring bikes (Magneet - 27x1, Raleigh - 26x2.15) I carry the usual necessary stuff (tube, inflator, tyre irons, etc.) but both those bikes are my long haulers with racks, and I switch the panniers and handlebar bag between them. I've lived with the usual emergency tub setup (spare tyre strapped to the seat rails, glue in a back pocket, frame pump always on the bike - nowdays a compressed gas inflator and a couple of spare whippets in the pocket with the glue) for so long, I've got no clue how a modern cyclist handles a flat.
sykerocker: I never needed to use additional glue when mounting a spare tubular. I use a mastique which never sets up brittle-like the Vittoria and make sure I have a film of fresh tacky glue on the base tape of my spare. The spare should be folded basetape to basetape then into 1/3's. This will adhere to the residual glue on your rim in order to get you home. If you use glue as a field repair you run a high risk of rolling the tire in a turn unless you want to stay put for a few hours while the glue cures.
PS Obviously don't corner like you normally do or you will lose skin.
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