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Retro roadies- old frames with STI's or Ergos

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Retro roadies- old frames with STI's or Ergos

Old 04-26-14, 10:02 PM
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Bridgestone 700

Here's my commuter a "85 Bridgestone 700. I powder coated it and transferred a Dura Ace 7700 group from another bike to it. Rides great.
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Old 04-27-14, 03:21 AM
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Just finished my first modernized retro roadie, Crescent Deda Race 2316. Bike weight is about 9,4 kg. Loving it.
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Old 04-27-14, 08:08 AM
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Originally Posted by polkadot
Just finished my first modernized retro roadie, Crescent Deda Race 2316. Bike weight is about 9,4 kg. Loving it.
May be the only 'Crescent' on this thread! I know it's all ultimately personal preference, but I am very curious how you arrived upon that choice of bars / lever placement... Are you riding in the drops most of the time? I've found that generation of Shimano levers to be way more comfortable angled up a bit from level, not down.
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Old 04-27-14, 09:11 AM
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Originally Posted by tamaso206
May be the only 'Crescent' on this thread! I know it's all ultimately personal preference, but I am very curious how you arrived upon that choice of bars / lever placement... Are you riding in the drops most of the time? I've found that generation of Shimano levers to be way more comfortable angled up a bit from level, not down.
I have seen some single speed conversion for these cheaper Crescent frames elsewhere but this kind of modernization projects not that many. I have here full Shimano 105 5700 groupset and Fulcrum Racing 3 wheels that I found dead cheap second-hand. I try to wear those awful pink Maxxis tyres out as soon as possible. Also handlebar tapes will be in white color some day.

I'm driving most of the time in the drops and based on few rides the geometry seems to work for me. Big amount of drop means that when I'm on flatland the bike is flying.
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Old 04-27-14, 09:21 AM
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hey guys can I play?





I hate the look and feel of most Shimano brifters but have found peace with index shifting via campy ergo shifters
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Old 04-27-14, 12:27 PM
  #3806  
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Here is the current state of my late 70's Woodrup (Giro?) with Reynolds 531 frame/fork built with a 9-speed Athena purchased from the forums.

-Athena 9-speed Ergos
-Athena RD, Veloce FD
-Chorus rear hub, unknown Campy front hub laced to Mavic Module rims
-Campy Eculid MTB crank with 46/34 rings
-Campy cassette
-Campy post
-VO stem/bell
-Phil Wood CHP pedals
-Brooks B17 Competition Standard
-Bluemel Popular fenders
-Tektro R556 Brakes
-Schwalbe Marathon tires

The paint has a lot of...patina...to it. It rides super nice, and it's pretty dialed in as it sits right now. I basically keep it in the big ring and use the small ring as a bailout. It's taken about 4-5 builds of various quality levels to get to this point. I seriously couldn't be happier.


Last edited by YoKev; 04-27-14 at 05:11 PM.
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Old 04-30-14, 03:13 AM
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Originally Posted by frantik
hey guys can I play?
That stem is just so wrong. If a comfy ride is a must why not install a riser bar?
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Old 04-30-14, 05:12 AM
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Lovin' yer ride frantik!
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Old 04-30-14, 05:22 AM
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Originally Posted by polkadot
That stem is just so wrong. If a comfy ride is a must why not install a riser bar?
because i want a drop bar?

cheers YoKev.. looking at your bike makes me imagine you grinding out some gravel on your way home from running errands around town.. sweet rare campy mtb stuff too btw
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Old 04-30-14, 05:39 AM
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Originally Posted by Ksyrium
Here's my commuter a "85 Bridgestone 700. I powder coated it and transferred a Dura Ace 7700 group from another bike to it. Rides great.
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Old 04-30-14, 05:42 AM
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Originally Posted by tamaso206
May be the only 'Crescent' on this thread! I know it's all ultimately personal preference, but I am very curious how you arrived upon that choice of bars / lever placement... Are you riding in the drops most of the time? I've found that generation of Shimano levers to be way more comfortable angled up a bit from level, not down.
I respectfully discuss that the position is great for riding the drops. If anything, the bike resembles a track bike and speed, in a way that today's new top-ridden designs simply can't. If you fit to the drops, the tops are always comfortable (but slower).
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Old 04-30-14, 05:47 AM
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Originally Posted by polkadot
That stem is just so wrong. If a comfy ride is a must why not install a riser bar?
Look at the steerer. It was cut, very likely long before frantik ever saw the bike, as it was in MTB trim when he picked it up (and showed it here).

I'll surmise that "fit is everything," and he has the exact type of drop bar he wants on a bike that fits his (alleged) fetish for DB's.

It's a heck of a combination of the frames he likes, the running gear he needs, fit to his style, and done with panache. As a drop bar rider, I appreciate the real estate he's created in the drops, same as I see the "built for speed" so evident in that Crescent.

If he left it unlocked near me, I'd be absolutely tempted.... Looks like a fantastic commuter, and one heck of a gravel grinder if needed. I've been trying to create a grinder out of a road bike, and I'm coming to the conclusion that frantik's way may be more of the way to go, supported by the growing number of builds in that tendency appearing here on BF and local roads.

Innovation amongst cyclists is the answer to the hybrids being produced that have all the appeal of a gum wrapper. What you did with the Crescent and what frantik did with the Ti DB are fine examples of tailoring bikes to do what we want them to do, and how we want them to fit, perform, and look.

It's great that cycling is so inexpensive that we can do this.

Last edited by RobbieTunes; 04-30-14 at 05:56 AM.
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Old 04-30-14, 06:07 AM
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Cheers Robbie Fit definitely is everything.. with these type of drop bars you ride in the drops all the time so it's common to use a mega riser stem. I'm still dialing in the fit so this stem may eventually be replaced. If the fork had a longer steerer tube I think it would look a little less extreme, but using a steerer extension would be uglier and heavier too.

And yeah, converting ATBs into road machines gives you a fine "road bike" that is a lot more capable than a typical racing bike. You will have to pay a weight penalty, but if you seek out the lightest frames and components, you can still get into road bike territory..
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Old 04-30-14, 06:16 AM
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Originally Posted by RobbieTunes
Innovation amongst cyclists is the answer to the hybrids being produced that have all the appeal of a gum wrapper. What you did with the Crescent and what frantik did with the Ti DB are fine examples of tailoring bikes to do what we want them to do, and how we want them to fit, perform, and look.
I realize now that my original comment was a bit harsh, sorry. Yeah, we see this kind of tailoring in today's pro peloton too with too small frames and long slammed stems. Whatever works...
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Old 04-30-14, 08:54 AM
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Originally Posted by Ksyrium
Here's my commuter a "85 Bridgestone 700. I powder coated it and transferred a Dura Ace 7700 group from another bike to it. Rides great.
I love this one. Simple and well done. Did you have to use long reach brakes or did the 700 use 700c wheels originally?
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Old 04-30-14, 09:11 AM
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Originally Posted by frantik
hey guys can I play?





I hate the look and feel of most Shimano brifters but have found peace with index shifting via campy ergo shifters
No mention of the maker, who is it? Cool bike, commuter/utility/gravel grinder? thanks, Brian

edit: I now see in RobbieTunes post its a DB
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Old 04-30-14, 03:18 PM
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This 1987 Marinoni is my second contribution to this excellent thread, and it has quickly become my favorite (the bike and the thread). The paint and chrome (complete frame and fork, under the paint) are in excellent condition, which is especially remarkable since paint doesn't adhere well to chrome. It's built up with my usual eclectic Sachs New Success/Shimano/Ritchey/Campagnolo/miscellaneous mix. The Gilles Berthoud Aravis saddle is breaking in nicely and doesn't require as much nose-up tilt as the Brooks in my experience, but it does share the limited rail length with them, so the VO Long Setback seatpost works nicely. I like to cross the shift cables under the DT to keep the cable housings off the HT.







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Old 05-01-14, 05:59 AM
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Originally Posted by polkadot
That stem is just so wrong. If a comfy ride is a must why not install a riser bar?
You've got problems thinking that only the stem is wrong...
Did you not notice it's not even a road bike, but a mountain bike on slicks?

It really is an ugly bike, but it does remind of me of some of Charlie Cunningham's innovations in the early days of MTB.
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Old 05-01-14, 06:28 AM
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Originally Posted by calstar
No mention of the maker, who is it? Cool bike, commuter/utility/gravel grinder? thanks, Brian

edit: I now see in RobbieTunes post its a DB
It's a 1993 Diamondback Axis Team Titanium, frame made in the USA by Sandvik. I set it up to be mostly an urban road bike

it does remind of me of some of Charlie Cunningham's innovations in the early days of MTB.
cheers, that's actually kinda what I was going for..
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Old 05-01-14, 08:01 AM
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Originally Posted by RobbieTunes
I respectfully discuss that the position is great for riding the drops. If anything, the bike resembles a track bike and speed, in a way that today's new top-ridden designs simply can't. If you fit to the drops, the tops are always comfortable (but slower).
Sure, nothing at all wrong with deep drops, if you can use them! In fact, on a frame sized for the rider in a 'traditional' way like that Crescent is, deep drop bars are gonna be the only way you can get low like that. I was more referring to the placement of the levers. I prefer to have my bikes set up so that all the hand positions available are relatively comfortable and usable, and my comment is just that in my experience down-sloping hoods are not going to be fun for your wrists at all. If you look around you will be hard-pressed to find many bikes under serious riders that have the hoods set up like that, regardless of how deep the drops are-- call it fashion or whatever you want .

I generally do hate to talk about bike setup on this thread, but I think it might be beneficial to folks who are just being introduced to new modern shifters doing these conversions-- shifters with hoods arguably intended ergonomically to be ridden level or slightly upward tilting. Of course, as you noted, the beauty of fiddling with bikes is improvising and finding what works for you individually!

I would just consider moving the levers up on the bar a bit if the rider puts some more miles on and doesn't find the hoods to be a comfortable perch... Who knows, they may be. sumgy's bike is a good example of bars with decent drop and more utilitarian hood placement, in my opinion:

vs.

Last edited by tamaso206; 05-01-14 at 08:06 AM.
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Old 05-01-14, 01:55 PM
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Originally Posted by tamaso206
I generally do hate to talk about bike setup on this thread, but I think it might be beneficial to folks who are just being introduced to new modern shifters doing these conversions-- shifters with hoods arguably intended ergonomically to be ridden level or slightly upward tilting. Of course, as you noted, the beauty of fiddling with bikes is improvising and finding what works for you individually!
Good discussion, thanks! Since the installation of the bike I've ridden only couple of times with it. The shape of the ITM Europe handlebar is so different from handlebars we see today that I don't think it is possible to level the hoods. Or I can, but then the handlebar is not exactly parallel to the ground. Ideas that I could try?

My body flexes easily to low riding positions, so comfy geometry is not at all important. I just want that the bike would have as traditional looks as possible with the current group.

Last edited by polkadot; 05-01-14 at 02:00 PM.
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Old 05-01-14, 02:45 PM
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Originally Posted by polkadot
Good discussion, thanks! Since the installation of the bike I've ridden only couple of times with it. The shape of the ITM Europe handlebar is so different from handlebars we see today that I don't think it is possible to level the hoods. Or I can, but then the handlebar is not exactly parallel to the ground. Ideas that I could try?

My body flexes easily to low riding positions, so comfy geometry is not at all important. I just want that the bike would have as traditional looks as possible with the current group.
Stay aero, my friend.
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Old 05-01-14, 02:48 PM
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Originally Posted by Dfrost
This 1987 Marinoni is my second contribution to this excellent thread, and it has quickly become my favorite (the bike and the thread). The paint and chrome (complete frame and fork, under the paint) are in excellent condition, which is especially remarkable since paint doesn't adhere well to chrome. It's built up with my usual eclectic Sachs New Success/Shimano/Ritchey/Campagnolo/miscellaneous mix. The Gilles Berthoud Aravis saddle is breaking in nicely and doesn't require as much nose-up tilt as the Brooks in my experience, but it does share the limited rail length with them, so the VO Long Setback seatpost works nicely. I like to cross the shift cables under the DT to keep the cable housings off the HT.


All mixed breeds should be so "ugly."
Very nice build, great seat post.
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Old 05-01-14, 02:55 PM
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Originally Posted by polkadot
Good discussion, thanks! Since the installation of the bike I've ridden only couple of times with it. The shape of the ITM Europe handlebar is so different from handlebars we see today that I don't think it is possible to level the hoods. Or I can, but then the handlebar is not exactly parallel to the ground. Ideas that I could try?
Cheers, lovely bike, truly! Well, if you break the 'rule' about having the lever tip parallel to the bottom of the drops, and just leave the bars where they are but mount the levers slightly higher you may be able to get level hoods and still shift easily from the drops. But, the shape of the bend might not work mounting the levers higher.

In that case, there are plenty of other drop bars in 25.4 and 26.0 that would allow you to achieve level hoods and still medium/deepish drops (aka that aren't 'compact' drops). If those ITMs are 25.4, I am a big fan of the Nitto B115 which works well with modern levers but is a nice classic round drop bar. I have my current rider setup with these Nittos and they are suberb (pictured below w/ Campy levers, but I currently have 5700 levers on the same bars and they work just as well):


Originally Posted by polkadot
My body flexes easily to low riding positions, so comfy geometry is not at all important. I just want that the bike would have as traditional looks as possible with the current group.
Well the 5700 is already pretty 'un-traditional' so I wouldn't worry a ton about the ergo bar shape, something that hasn't aged terribly well, imo . Drop bars have been round for a good while, and will continue to be probably as long there are road bikes, so you could change that and still rest easy at night.

Last edited by tamaso206; 05-01-14 at 03:20 PM. Reason: pics
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Old 05-01-14, 06:07 PM
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I get the impression you think he should change his bike.
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