Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Classic & Vintage
Reload this Page >

Info on a Peugeot Montreal Express?

Notices
Classic & Vintage This forum is to discuss the many aspects of classic and vintage bicycles, including musclebikes, lightweights, middleweights, hi-wheelers, bone-shakers, safety bikes and much more.

Info on a Peugeot Montreal Express?

Old 04-24-08, 03:26 PM
  #1  
LetterRider
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
LetterRider's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 77
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Info on a Peugeot Montreal Express?

I just pulled a late 80s Peugeot Montreal Express out of the dumpster. Why can't I find anything about these bikes? It's Canadian, sporting Sakae cranks and a sticker saying Ishiwata 4130 Chromemoly. That's about all I know. Does this frame go by something other than Montreal Express?
Anyone know anything?
LetterRider is offline  
Old 04-24-08, 04:34 PM
  #2  
nlerner
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 14,508
Mentioned: 358 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2328 Post(s)
Liked 2,053 Times in 1,035 Posts
Is it a lugged MTB? I fixed up a Peugeot Canyon Express a few years back for someone as a single speed MTB: U-brake in the rear, cantis in front, unicrown fork, 559mm wheels. It was a nice bike.

Neal
nlerner is offline  
Old 04-24-08, 05:18 PM
  #3  
miamijim
Senior Member
 
miamijim's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Tampa, Florida
Posts: 14,028
Mentioned: 39 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 381 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 40 Times in 35 Posts
Aside from saying 'it is what it says it is' there's not much more to say. In the late 80's Peugeots entry level mtn. bikes were made by Procycle in Cananda. There were 9 mountain bikes in the line up for 1989...the Montreal Express was one from the bottom.

All potential Ebay pics get my special tag.....

miamijim is offline  
Old 04-24-08, 08:22 PM
  #4  
Grand Bois
Senior Member
 
Grand Bois's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Pinole, CA, USA
Posts: 17,415
Mentioned: 24 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 437 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 9 Times in 9 Posts
Were they making Peugeot mountain bikes in France, Canada and Japan at the same time? I have a Japanese-built one from the late eighties and I've seen pictures of French models that look like they were made at around the same time.
Grand Bois is offline  
Old 04-24-08, 09:07 PM
  #5  
miamijim
Senior Member
 
miamijim's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Tampa, Florida
Posts: 14,028
Mentioned: 39 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 381 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 40 Times in 35 Posts
Originally Posted by Dirtdrop View Post
Were they making Peugeot mountain bikes in France, Canada and Japan at the same time? I have a Japanese-built one from the late eighties and I've seen pictures of French models that look like they were made at around the same time.
They may have been.....Does yours have one of the 'Designed in the U.S.A. Made in Japan/France' decals?

I know they put those decals on because they didnt want consumers to say, "what do the French know about Mtn. Bikes." We need to keep in mind that the mid to late 80's was still the infancy of mtn. biking.
miamijim is offline  
Old 04-24-08, 09:18 PM
  #6  
miamijim
Senior Member
 
miamijim's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Tampa, Florida
Posts: 14,028
Mentioned: 39 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 381 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 40 Times in 35 Posts
I didnt a little researching and I'll say, "yes, they did."

The '89 brochure says, while describing the Orient Express, "Europe meets the far east". If you look at the Europe Express you can clearly see Peugeots traditional chainstay protector with their red/blue logo while the Orient Express has black protector without it. Throw in the Montreal Express and they have bikes made in France, Japan and Canada all within one model year.

No wonder they only lasted one more season.

Jim
miamijim is offline  
Old 04-25-08, 07:44 AM
  #7  
LetterRider
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
LetterRider's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 77
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thank you for the info - I couldn't even find it on any of their websites or catalogs.
To answer the first question, it is a lugged MTB and I'll probably set it up similar to your Canyon Express, nlerner, perhaps with a flipflop rear wheel.
It should make a nice winter commuter.
LetterRider is offline  
Old 10-16-20, 08:35 PM
  #8  
marchman321
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 14
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Liked 4 Times in 4 Posts
Peugeot 1988 montreal express dimensions

Ok. Details. These were hard won, folks, so pay attention if you're lucky to have one of these bikes in usable condition. View the 1988 Peugeot catalog page for the Montreal Express on " bikeboompeugeot " for the rest of the information not mentioned here.

I built up one of these and I'm hitting mile 600 on new wheels, basically a new bike minus the frame, derailleurs, and headset. I have the 55cm/56cm model.
With fenders these frames have about 10mm of clearance for 650BX38 aka "27.5"X1.5 tires. I have linear pull BOX 2 brakes (which are AMAZING and have come close to throwing me off with their ridiculous braking power) installed and there is ample clearance for the upgrade to the larger 650B wheel size.

Original components:

Steering tube:
1" 2.54mm diameter
7" 178mm steering tube
7-3/8" 187.4mm stack height with threaded headset including lock nut

Threaded headset (including top and bottom races) is then 1-5/8" 41.3mm

Original Handlebar is chrome steel Wald All Rounder 815 / Wald 815 Low-Rise Touring Bike Handlebar (20.25-Inches Wide, Chrome, 2-Inch Rise) 25.4 clamp or 1" clamp, 22.2 rest of bar.

Original headset locknut says "YST 22.4" These are BMX headsets and are, so far for me, rock solid. They are easily replaced with any modern ISO threaded headset because the steering tube is ISO threaded. They are NOT French or Italian threaded or whatever weird alternative which might have existed in 1988. If you are removing the cantilever brake hanger to install linear pull brakes a spacer ring with a key notch to lock into the steering tube must be installed for proper bearing adjustment - no other substitutions will work! The height of the steel spacer I used was 0.129" or 3.3mm.

Head tube length:
5-3/4" 145mm

Seat Tube:
21-5/8" 55cm seat tube length, 26.2 seat post (inside seat tube diameter)

Spec at base of seat tube: "tires no larger than 1.625 inches"; 1-5/8" 41.3mm. Given the bike is such an odd duck with 26"/559 ISO wheels this is most likely a spec for 650B wheels without fenders. 559 ISO seems more of a bad last minute USA marketing design decision for these "Express" frames. LINEAR PULL BRAKES ARE NEEDED TO CONVERT TO 650B WHEELS. Original tires were "GOLDEN BOY" 26" X 1.5". Photos and catalog page also show plenty of space for 650B wheels.

Front fork is 100mm OLD hub spacing.

126mm O.L.D. Rear hub spacing. I used SHIMANO FH-HB30-8S. I replaced the freehub body with a 7S by partially lacing the hub into a trash rim. I cut the axle to 137mm. I had the spacers to size the OLD back to 126mm The FH-HB30-8S are a cheap and easy to replace solution - and quite durable if just used for streets and paved trails. I used Lubrimatic Marine Trailer Wheel Bearing Grease.
The rear drops (on the MONTREAL EXPRESS only!) are threaded for 3mm adjustment bolts. This allows for no fuss removal of the rear wheel and much easier tire repair.
To resize compatible modern hub axles to the 126mm spacing: the Montreal Express has a 7mm rear drop width. Shimano skewer axles have about 5.5mm of axle on each side resting on the drops.

Bottom bracket is British/I.S.O. 1.37/1.375" x 24 tpi

I used a 118 Bottom bracket spindle and a new 170mm Sugino triple crank. New bottom bracket was Shimano UN55 68X118
THUN branded Original BB spindle stuck out approximately 28.6mm from fixed cup. Fixed cup lip thickness is 4mm from BB shell. Original SA Sakae triple for 6 speed taper depth (unmounted) is 18mm.
130mm original spindle length not including locknut threads.
35mm left side length to edge of BB axle cone race (removed from bike)
40mm right drive side length to edge of BB axle cone race (removed from bike)

The original crank length was 175mm

Bottom Bracket shell width is 68mm
Thun bearings were 1/4".
The underside of the bottom bracket is easily threaded for a bolt to hold the original nylon plastic derailleur cable guide. I believe it was M5 threaded but it may have been M6. I did this for sealed bottom bracket clearance.

Original hubs were entry level Maillard
1/4" 6.35mm Rear hub bearings, 18 count
3/16" 4.7625mm Front hub bearings, 20 count
9mm Rear axle spindle diameter
Maillard thread pitch not compatible with Shimano. Rear hub cone drive side damaged.
Original rims were
Weinmann- Belgium
559X20 or 26"X1.75"

1" 25.4mm clamp Original chrome steel handlebar with 7/8" 22.2mm handlebar surface
25.4mm Original clamp stem. Kalloy AL 219
140mm Original approximate post length (wedge to neck length at center of post)
60mm Original approximate extension to handlebars (center of post at wedge bolt to center of clamp)

Original Shifters:
Shimano RD-L541 rear 6 speed SIS - very nice!
Shimano FD-AX55 front 28.6mm or 1-1/8" - also works well in the all steel model
Shimano MS-41 3X6 thumb shifters - front derailleur thumb shifter was not holding position and broke during disassembly.

Chain was 1/8" and not compatible with most modern 8 speed chains or chain tools.

That nails down most of the questions I had before I bought the bike. It was a HUGE gamble but it absolutely paid off. I haven't taken the bike above 26MPH because my Shimano DH-3N71 front dynamo hub probably isn't built for over 30MPH.


Last edited by marchman321; 10-17-20 at 05:35 PM. Reason: adding photos
marchman321 is offline  
Old 10-17-20, 05:05 AM
  #9  
viperocco
Senior Member
 
viperocco's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2020
Location: Monroe MI
Posts: 154

Bikes: 05 Fuji Outland Pro, Fuji cape may, Giant simple single, Peugeot Corbier, Miyata 215st

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 34 Post(s)
Liked 33 Times in 20 Posts
Originally Posted by LetterRider View Post
I just pulled a late 80s Peugeot Montreal Express out of the dumpster. Why can't I find anything about these bikes? It's Canadian, sporting Sakae cranks and a sticker saying Ishiwata 4130 Chromemoly. That's about all I know. Does this frame go by something other than Montreal Express?
Anyone know anything?
You all and your lucky dumpster grabs...got pics ​​​​​​​?
viperocco is offline  
Old 10-17-20, 09:23 AM
  #10  
T-Mar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 21,424
Mentioned: 567 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3961 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1,476 Times in 1,066 Posts
Originally Posted by viperocco View Post
You all and your lucky dumpster grabs...got pics ?
I doubt you'll get pics from the OP. This is a 12-1/2 year old zombies thread. He hasn't been active on the forum for over 12 years.
T-Mar is offline  
Old 10-17-20, 09:45 AM
  #11  
viperocco
Senior Member
 
viperocco's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2020
Location: Monroe MI
Posts: 154

Bikes: 05 Fuji Outland Pro, Fuji cape may, Giant simple single, Peugeot Corbier, Miyata 215st

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 34 Post(s)
Liked 33 Times in 20 Posts
Originally Posted by T-Mar View Post
I doubt you'll get pics from the OP. This is a 12-1/2 year old zombies thread. He hasn't been active on the forum for over 12 years.
Damn , you are probably right
viperocco is offline  
Old 10-17-20, 10:09 AM
  #12  
scarlson 
Senior Member
 
scarlson's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Medford MA
Posts: 1,351

Bikes: Ron Cooper touring, 1959 Jack Taylor 650b ladyback touring tandem, Vitus 979, Joe Bell painted Claud Butler Dalesman, Colin Laing curved tube tandem, heavily-Dilberted 1982 Trek 6xx, René Herse tandem

Mentioned: 48 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 594 Post(s)
Liked 730 Times in 413 Posts
But after they've got 2 more posts, @marchman321 can post pics of theirs!!

I for one am excited to see it. I rode a Pug Orient Express in college. I have the fondest memories of bombing around campus on it, drunk or late to class or work-study. I had a headlight on it from an old tractor. It never let me down, and its high-trail geometry saved my neck a few times! You could lock the front wheel and it would skid in a straight line for yards.

As for the dynamo hub, I have had a Shimano DH-3N71 up to 50mph with no ill effects on the Busch and Muller LEDs I was running. The hub is also fine. There are no brushes or rotating coils to overspeed, so it's just like a regular hub in terms of mechanicals. What you don't want is to do that with an incandescent lamp. You will likely overvolt it and grill the bulb. LEDs are not so susceptible to this sort of thing due to physics and engineering.
__________________
Owner & co-founder, Cycles René Hubris. Unfortunately attaching questionable braze-ons to perfectly good frames since about 2015. With style.

Last edited by scarlson; 10-17-20 at 10:15 AM.
scarlson is offline  
Likes For scarlson:
Old 10-17-20, 05:32 PM
  #13  
marchman321
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 14
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Liked 4 Times in 4 Posts
@scarlson - thanks so much for the info on the Shimano dyno hub - I'll take it to the next level on the downhill Monday.
marchman321 is offline  
Old 12-02-20, 08:15 PM
  #14  
marchman321
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 14
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Liked 4 Times in 4 Posts
The same bike as in my earlier post. I've ridden the Montreal Express for 1100 miles since September 2020. The new wheels are a definite improvement in speed and therefore commute times. SOMA 32H Weymouth rims, DT spokes, with a Shutter Precision PV-8 dynamo, a NOS Shimano RSX 7 Speed hub, and Schwalbe Marathon Plus 650X38B tires. As you can see there is plenty of space for debris to get around the tires between the fenders. The old wheels (as seen above) are for sale at $150 as is - but they're straight / in perfect round with plenty of brake surface left on them and they have smooth running, well cared for bearing surfaces.

I put the spoke reflectors from Cycle King on to get the wheel effect from the movie "TRON".....


Last edited by marchman321; 12-16-20 at 08:15 PM.
marchman321 is offline  
Likes For marchman321:
Old 12-16-20, 08:47 PM
  #15  
marchman321
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 14
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Liked 4 Times in 4 Posts
Peugeot 1988 Montreal Express 650B full conversion

I've found the sweet spot for these wheels. A problem with high pressure tires is they lose air more quickly so I really have to inflate them twice a week if I want to keep my commute times down. I backtracked on my brake adjustment, put in a new rear brake cable, and used a rubber band to space the pads from the rims as per Park Tool's instructions. I did have difficulty with a defective tire with a bad wire bead and that has been replaced. I also have to remember to lubricate my chain more often....so yes, these SOMA Weymouth rimmed wheels are absolutely stunning in terms of speed, impressive acceleration and razor sharp agility. If I need to I am generally able to pare down my morning commute by a full 15 minutes because of them. Today my top speed was 25MPH on a small downhill in the Chicago suburbs with a top cruising speed on flat pavement of 22MPH, but I think I have yet to discover their true potential. I'm rounding the corner towards 4000 miles of riding bikes in 2020, and the Montreal Express frame, derailleurs, and headset are getting a strong recommendation from me.

Do bear in mind that in this configuration 700X23C tires have the same diameter and fender clearance as my 650X38B tires and with fenders this bike might possibly even fit a 700X28C tire. While the Box 2 linear pull brakes are not equipped to reach that high or an additional 19mm up from their current position (a slot 11mm longer than the Box 2 linear pull brakes I have with 108mm arms) there are a few mechanical options to bring the pads higher, the best of them being Paul Components Motolite linear pull/v-brakes, as nice might be center pull Dia Compe brakes, and the least attractive would be side pull caliper brakes. But I am choosing 650B wheels for a more comfortable ride and more reliable tires. In my experience thicker tires with superior flat protection will avoid getting flat tires for a very long time.

Last edited by marchman321; 12-17-20 at 08:42 PM.
marchman321 is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.