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Brooks Titanium vs. Chrome rails - ride quality?

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Brooks Titanium vs. Chrome rails - ride quality?

Old 06-12-08, 07:57 AM
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Brooks Titanium vs. Chrome rails - ride quality?

Hi

I'm looking to buy another Brooks - I have the Swift and Swallow in Ti versions, and like the ride very much.

In the interest of saving Money, I was considering the steel (chrome) rail version of these saddles (esp. the Swallow).

Forgetting about the weight penalty, which I don't mind at all, is there a difference in the ride? I have heard that the Ti rails flex more and hence make for a better ride at first but maybe are too flexy as the leather breaks in.

I should mention - I am 220 pounds, and I loved my Ti-rail Brooks right out of the box. I have maybe 500 or so miles on my commuter with Swift (no sit bone dents or softening as of yet). The weekend bikes with Swifts and Swallows have maybe 50-100 miles apiece at present.
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Old 06-12-08, 08:01 AM
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....so you're concerned about the Ti rails being too flexy?

I wouldn't worry too much, I imagine that the 'flex' of the titanium vs. the chrome rails are inconsequential next to the million other more significant variables on your bike.
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Old 06-12-08, 08:05 AM
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The titanium does weigh a bit less, but I concur with awc380 that the ride should be about the same.
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Old 06-12-08, 08:44 AM
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Originally Posted by awc380 View Post
....so you're concerned about the Ti rails being too flexy?
no, I was worried that the steel rails might be a lot more harsh riding with a new (not broken in) Brooks, esp. the Swallow.
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Old 06-12-08, 09:34 AM
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I don't think the Steel rails will make all that much difference, at least they
have never been a problem with me before.

Marty
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Old 06-15-08, 04:11 PM
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Brooks tit. v chrome

I've been Brooks' only authorised spares and repairs specialist for nearly twenty years now.
When the Company first introduced titanium saddle frames, about 15 years ago, I started to be asked to replace steel frames with tit. ones (usually as replacement for broken frames, but not always), and I've never received a negative report about any of these 'upgrades'.
A short while ago, at the prompting of a couple of customers, I contacted a number of these 'tit. converts', to see how satisfied they were; surprisingly, they all responded - and, without exception, they all acknowledged a significant improvement in comfort and general performance. I think that they'd all regard themselves as 'serious' cyclists, who cover several thousands of miles in a year, and the casual/commuter cyclist might well not notice a similar benefit.
In the course of my work I must have ridden many hundreds of different 'traditional' leather saddles; not too many of these have been tit.-framed models, of course, but I think that I've had sufficient experience of them to say that the superior resilience of the material does offer a significant benefit. However, the amount of weight saved, compared with a steel frame, is of no importance, IMO.
It must be bourne in mind that the quality of leather can differ considerably within various examples of the same model of saddle, and a better frame won't compensate for a poor bit of leather.
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