Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Classic & Vintage
Reload this Page >

advice for buying C&V bikes

Classic & Vintage This forum is to discuss the many aspects of classic and vintage bicycles, including musclebikes, lightweights, middleweights, hi-wheelers, bone-shakers, safety bikes and much more.

advice for buying C&V bikes

Old 09-23-08, 01:06 PM
  #1  
EraserGirl
Registered User
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Methuen, MA
Posts: 387

Bikes: Armstrong, Robin Hood, Hercules, Phillips

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
advice for buying C&V bikes

I did look around and didn't find a thread that covered this topic for C&V.

Someone was asking me about picking up an 'old' bike for herself as she is in the market for what I personally call a 'Mom bike'. When you have 2 kids, two NEW bikes will set you back a lot so if Mom wants to go out with the kids a few times a year an older bike in good condition is just what she needs.

Since I am fairly new to this, the only good rules of thumb I could give her were to look for
Raleigh, Schwinn or Columbia where the gears aren't all messed up. Good solid bikes that are worth fixing up.
I figure everything can be replaced on the bike, but the labor involved in cleaning up the gears can be cost prohibitive, but like I said, I am new to this

Can folks chip in with any specific or general advice about buying old bikes?
(Primarily advice for folks who are not deep down crazy for restoration, like us.)

I think I may put a few of my finds aside a few Mom Bikes for a spring yard sale to benefit my Rail Trail program.
EraserGirl is offline  
Old 09-23-08, 01:18 PM
  #2  
miamijim
Senior Member
 
miamijim's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Tampa, Florida
Posts: 13,923
Mentioned: 37 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 323 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 5 Times in 5 Posts
My 4 rules...

1. Set budget
2. Buy the correct size
3. Buy what you like
4. DO NOT break rules 1, 2 or 3.
miamijim is offline  
Old 09-23-08, 01:37 PM
  #3  
Oldpeddaller
Senior Member
 
Oldpeddaller's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Maidstone, Kent, England
Posts: 2,628

Bikes: 1970 Holdsworth Mistral, Vitus 979, Colnago Primavera, Corratec Hydracarbon, Massi MegaTeam, 1935 Claud Butler Super Velo, Carrera Virtuoso, Viner, 1953 Claud Butler Silver Jubilee, 1954 Holdsworth Typhoon, 1966 Claud Butler Olympic Road, 1982 Claud

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Totally agree with Miamijim - perfect sense!
Oldpeddaller is offline  
Old 09-23-08, 01:51 PM
  #4  
John E
feros ferio
 
John E's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: www.ci.encinitas.ca.us
Posts: 19,409

Bikes: 1959 & 1960 Capo; 1982 Bianchi; 1988 Schwinn KOM-10;

Mentioned: 30 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 699 Post(s)
Liked 21 Times in 21 Posts
I, too, like miamijim's rules. Size counts!
__________________
"Far and away the best prize that life offers is the chance to work hard at work worth doing." --Theodore Roosevelt
Capo: 1959 Modell Campagnolo, S/N 40324
Capo: 1960 Sieger (2), S/N 42624, 42597
Peugeot: 1970 UO-8, S/N 0010468
Bianchi: 1982 Campione d'Italia, S/N 1.M9914
Schwinn: 1988 Project KOM-10, S/N F804069
John E is offline  
Old 09-23-08, 02:05 PM
  #5  
USAZorro
Señor Member
 
USAZorro's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Florence, KY
Posts: 16,214

Bikes: Mostly English - predominantly Raleighs

Mentioned: 48 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 695 Post(s)
Liked 8 Times in 8 Posts
When you're buying for yourself, those are good guidelines.

I'd add:

5. Make sure the seat post and the stem move
6. Avoid heavy rust
__________________
In search of what to search for.
USAZorro is offline  
Old 09-23-08, 02:17 PM
  #6  
makeitwork
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Madison, Tennessee
Posts: 62

Bikes: 1979 Rampar R-1 (SS Conversion), 1991 Jamis Exile

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
All great advice, especially "buy what you like."

My single-speed is a converted 30 year old 10-speed Rampar, and rides like a dream. Took a little fixing up, but the price was right since I've had the bike since it was new. The components still looked good, but I wanted a lighter bike that wouldn't need much maintenance.

Probably wouldn't see a bidding war on it pre-rehab, but it translated into a really nice bike.

The odds are good that the brands mentioned would be suitable, but you might miss a nice, unknown bike that would work fine for someone who wants to ride around the park, for a much lower price.

Mid-rehab:



(Working on getting a picture of the final product. And yes, I know the labels aren't lined up with the valves )

Last edited by makeitwork; 09-23-08 at 02:21 PM. Reason: add picture
makeitwork is offline  
Old 09-23-08, 10:39 PM
  #7  
teambhultima
Go Team BH!
 
teambhultima's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: just outside B-ham, AL
Posts: 238

Bikes: Austro Daimler Ultima

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
All good advice above.
Check local thrift stores. I've picked up 3 nice old Schwinns there over the past few years that needed very little other than cleaning and new tubes & tires, all for very reasonable prices. Perfect for neighborhood cruisers with the kids!
Good luck!
teambhultima is offline  
Old 09-25-08, 01:07 PM
  #8  
sykerocker 
Senior Member
 
sykerocker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Ashland, VA
Posts: 4,088

Bikes: The keepers: 1958 Raleigh Lenton Grand Prix, 1968 Ranger, 1969 Magneet Sprint, 1971 Gitane Tour de France, 1973 Raleigh Tourist, 1973 Lambert, 1973 Schwinn Super Sport, 3 - 1986 Rossins, and a '77 PX-10 frame to be built.

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 87 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 13 Times in 10 Posts
Erasergirl requsted tha I cross post this from another thread. Hope it helps:

Back in the early 70's when I worked at the bike shop, the pecking order was as follows:

Schwinn/Raleigh/most anything lugged from Europe was top tier - the Schwinns could take a beating way better than the alternatives. Japanese bikes that were starting to show up were in the class, unless it was a C. Itoh. They were garbage.

Columbia's were about a half step down. Cosmetically they were obviously cheaper and a bit cruder, but the quality build was there, so you bought that if you couldn't afford a Schwinn. Sears bikes (non-Puch's) were about the same quality, although there was a bit of varience between the entire line.

Huffy's were another half to a full step down. Obviously cheaper, although they held together. A prime ride for a parent buying for a spoiled bratty kid who wasn't about to take care of it.

Murray's, although they looked about the same as Huffy's were definitely another step down. Now you're starting to deal with maintenance nightmares.

Iverson's were the absolute bottom of the barrel - to the point that no bicycle shop would ever consider carrying them under any conditions. Sold in catalog stores, toy stores and the forerunners of what later became the big box stores.
__________________
Syke

"No wonder we keep testing positive in their bicycle races. Everyone looks like they're full of testosterone when they're surrounded by Frenchmen." ---Argus Hamilton
sykerocker is offline  
Old 09-25-08, 01:10 PM
  #9  
infinityeye
Nut
 
infinityeye's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Tallahassle, FL
Posts: 697
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
don't buy french first.
infinityeye is offline  
Old 09-25-08, 01:13 PM
  #10  
cb400bill
Administrator
 
cb400bill's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Kalamazoo MI
Posts: 16,444

Bikes: Fuji SL 2.1 (carbon fiber), Pinarello Stelvio (steel), Cannondale Synapse (aluminum)

Mentioned: 32 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1254 Post(s)
Liked 39 Times in 28 Posts
Originally Posted by infinityeye View Post
don't buy french first.
What if you live in France?
cb400bill is offline  
Old 09-25-08, 03:01 PM
  #11  
Little Darwin
The Improbable Bulk
 
Little Darwin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Wilkes-Barre, PA
Posts: 8,401

Bikes: Many

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by cb400bill View Post
What if you live in France?
It could still be a problem for vintage frames since some threading etc was "unusual" so it can be difficult to find replacement parts.

Although, this does not (in my opinion) mean to avoid French bikes, just to be cognizant of potential issues.
__________________
Slow Ride Cyclists of NEPA

People do not seem to realize that their opinion of the world is also a confession of character.
- Ralph Waldo Emerson
Little Darwin is offline  
Old 09-25-08, 10:57 PM
  #12  
Iowegian
Senior Member
 
Iowegian's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Boulder, Colo
Posts: 1,974
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 76 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I'm guessing most of the mom's will like an upright riding position. Old rigid mountain bikes (no shocks) are incredibly cheap and give an upright riding position. Try to find one that looks like hasn't been used much, ie no dirt, no rust, maybe dusty and a few cobwebs but no serious signs of heavy use. A rusty chain means it been stored outside, pass on those. Take it for a ride and see what you think. If you ride a few bikes like this you will quickly be able to tell the good from the bad. Good bikes shift and brake crisply; bad bikes will be sloppy, sluggish, ill-tempered. Don't be put off by bikes with flat tires. Often these are the best deals and tubes only cost $3. Just make sure it fits you ie that you are comfortable standing over and sitting on the bike.
Iowegian is offline  
Old 09-26-08, 06:32 AM
  #13  
roccobike
Bike Junkie
 
roccobike's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: South of Raleigh, North of New Hill, East of Harris Lake, NC
Posts: 9,552

Bikes: Specialized Tarmac, Specialized Roubaix, Giant OCR-C, Specialized Stumpjumper FSR, Stumpjumper Comp, 88 & 92Nishiki Ariel, 87 Centurion Ironman, 92 Paramount, 84 Nishiki Medalist

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 47 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by Iowegian View Post
I'm guessing most of the mom's will like an upright riding position. Old rigid mountain bikes (no shocks) are incredibly cheap and give an upright riding position. Try to find one that looks like hasn't been used much, ie no dirt, no rust, maybe dusty and a few cobwebs but no serious signs of heavy use. A rusty chain means it been stored outside, pass on those. Take it for a ride and see what you think. If you ride a few bikes like this you will quickly be able to tell the good from the bad. Good bikes shift and brake crisply; bad bikes will be sloppy, sluggish, ill-tempered. Don't be put off by bikes with flat tires. Often these are the best deals and tubes only cost $3. Just make sure it fits you ie that you are comfortable standing over and sitting on the bike.
+1, Iowegian beat me to it. Low cost, well made, wide tires for extra stability, Old mountain bikes make great mom bikes. The "womens" models are not common, but sell for less. You can find these bikes at yard sales for $10-$20. Frequently less because the tires are flat. Seriously, inflate the tires before assuming the tubes are shot. Top notch brands are availiable, Specialized, Raleigh, Trek, Fuji, you can fill in your favorite LBS bike here. Also, if the shifters work, but are sluggish, don't be turned off usually a quick shot of chain lube spray into the shifters will free them up. If the shifters don't work, then walk away, that's the most expensive part to replace.
__________________
Roccobike BF Official Thread Terminator
roccobike is offline  
Old 09-26-08, 06:59 AM
  #14  
Peruano
Biker
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: New Mexico
Posts: 132

Bikes: One or more from each decade since 1960s

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
inexpensive rides

Iowegian and Roccobikes are hitting the meat of the issue. Almost any bike that fits will serve if:
The wheels spin easily and are true (straight). Look below the dust, but forget it if it has rust. Lift the back wheel and listen, if its smooth and quiet or merely the freewheel clicking good, if it sounds like you are grinding coffee bad. Ditto front wheel, does it roll easily. A good servicible bike will have parts that look manufactured as opposed to the cheapest ones that look like they were molded in my backyard forge. Don't let flat tires put you off if you can adequately evaluate size without riding it. The tires and tubes will set you back and additional $30, but need to be replaced on nearly all used bikes in the lower price range, and as pointed out that bike with flats can be bought a lot cheaper because most people don't want to mess with the extra challenge. Bright paint is not important but if its really badlys scratch abraded, or largely missing the previous owner has thrown it around like his dirty laundry, don't touch it. Good bikes, neglected for years, but stored indoors, often roll out at yard sales for $10 - $30, and on the last day they sometimes get reduced or gifted to some one who gave the steed a careful and thoughtful scrutiny. Nuff said. Tom
Peruano is offline  
Old 09-26-08, 07:11 AM
  #15  
EraserGirl
Registered User
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Methuen, MA
Posts: 387

Bikes: Armstrong, Robin Hood, Hercules, Phillips

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
thanks guys
i have already discovered the flat tire thing,
(tubes are costing me about 6 and tires 10-13 depending on size)
and avoiding problematic gears and shifters

i don't see a lot of used mountain bikes in my neck of the woods
but i am sure other people may
in my vicinity old road bikes in basements and garages are more common.
i am completely steering clear of bikes used by kids.
there isn't much left of them when the kids are done.
EraserGirl is offline  
Old 09-26-08, 10:55 AM
  #16  
Road Fan
Senior Member
 
Road Fan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Ann Arbor, MI
Posts: 14,205

Bikes: 1980 Masi, 1984 Mondonico, 1984 Trek 610, 1980 Woodrup Giro, 2005 Mondonico Futura Leggera ELOS, 1967 PX10E, 1971 Peugeot UO-8

Mentioned: 32 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 806 Post(s)
Liked 10 Times in 9 Posts
One thing to consider: Schwinn 3-speed tires (S-5 and S-6) are not easy to find in my experience.
Road Fan is offline  
Old 09-26-08, 11:22 AM
  #17  
wrk101
Thrifty Bill
 
wrk101's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Mountains of Western NC
Posts: 22,018

Bikes: 86 Katakura Silk, 87 Prologue X2, 88 Cimarron LE, 1975 Sekai 4000 Professional, 73 Paramount, plus more

Mentioned: 67 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 654 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 39 Times in 34 Posts
+1 Rigid frame steel mountain bike. Heck, I have found two good ones in the last day at thrift stores (one Giant, one Trek).

As for tubes, I pay $2 each from pricepoint (on the web). I shoot for less than $6 each for tires. This is for flip bikes (bikes to resell).

As far as who used the bike, I don't care. Looking at all the obese kids around here, they sure aren't wearing out any bikes!!! Garage sale bikes around here can be around $10 each. If the bike has alloy rims, seat post is not seized, no frame damage (dents), minimal rust, and not a Huffy/Roadmaster/etc, I buy it. I avoid the old steel cottered crank. Flat tires, seized cables, poor shifting are all expected and usually easily fixed.

If you don't want to do work on a bike, then buy from a local flipper. You should expect a flipper to sell you a bike in a ready to ride condition. Unless you enjoy working on bikes and looking for deals (stopping at a lot of thrift shops and garage sales), buying from a flipper is a better option.

I see several good rigid mountain bikes on the Boston Craigs List for under $100.
wrk101 is offline  
Old 09-26-08, 01:14 PM
  #18  
alanbikehouston
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 5,250
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
When I started buying older bikes, I did not give a lot of thought to the time and money it takes to restore a bike to "runs like new" condition. I've learned the hard way that buying an old bike for $100, and then spending $200 to get it into good riding condition costs more than a $150 bike that is in PERFECT condition.

Visit every bike shop within five miles of your home, and tell them you are looking for an older bike in great riding condition. If a shop does not have such a bike this month, they might get one in next month. Also, check out the Salvation Army, Goodwill, and other resale stores. Look for the bikes that look PERFECT. If you are willing to take your time, you will find bikes that probably have been ridden less than 20 miles during their lifespan.

An easy "test" of a bikes quality are the rims and weight. Good bikes have aluminum rims (bring a magnet to Goodwill if you are not sure how to tell). Really good bikes weigh between 20 pounds and 25 pounds, and decent bikes weight from 25 pounds to 29 pounds. If a bike weighs 50 pounds, even if it IS a "real" Schwinn, it will not be fun to ride.
alanbikehouston is offline  
Old 09-26-08, 02:49 PM
  #19  
mparker326
Senior Member
 
mparker326's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Knoxville, TN
Posts: 1,977

Bikes: Schwinn Paramount P15, Fisher Montare, Proteus, Rivendell Quickbeam

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 10 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I always see plenty of lady's 3 speeds around. Usually you can find one in decent condition for ~$75.

I got my wife one a few years back and she loves it.
mparker326 is offline  
Old 09-26-08, 03:13 PM
  #20  
KarmicPedals
Flower Power
 
KarmicPedals's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Little Havana, Miami
Posts: 196

Bikes: 1978 Raleigh Sprite Mixte, 1980 Raleigh LTD-3, 1982 Peugeot PH19

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
You should have a "wants" checklist that you compare with the bike and the cost of obtaining those wants AFTER you purchase the bike, if they can be added to the bike

For example:

Dealbreaker wants:

1) correct size
2) solid frame construction with preferred materials of choice (i.e. if you don't want a 40 pound bike, don't buy one)
3) Condition (if it's going to take you 20 hours to clean it up and repair it.. what is it REALLY worth to you?

Optional Wants:

Handlebar shape/size (think $10 on up for what you might want if you don't already have it to switch out)
stem size ($30 - $40 or more if you have to buy new)
tires/tubes condition
cranks
pedals
racks (a bike with front and back racks goes way up in value in my eyes)
basket
type of shifters (does it have stem and you want downtube? vice versa? or thumbs?)
fenders
levers
condition of paint
kickstand
seat
seat post
bottle cage
frame mounted pump

Just changing out the bars/stem, adding fenders, switching up the shifters/levers, changing out the seat can easily add a couple of hundred or more to the cost of the bike....
KarmicPedals is offline  
Old 09-26-08, 04:32 PM
  #21  
ogbigbird
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: yreka, ca
Posts: 542

Bikes: like 15. my favorite a 1951 schwinn spitfire cruiser. also have a 1959 amf roadmaster, 1962 jch deluxe cruiser among others.

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
here is a random bit of info i heard around, but it makes a lot of sense: bikes with "girls" frames are typically in better, untampered shape, than a bike with a conventional frame. the logic on this was that a young man or boy will be more likly to either be really hard on the bike and wear it out and more likely to "tinker" on it, therefor sometimes making it mechanically shady. an old mountain bike with flat bars, nice geometry and fat tire would be about perfect, as long as you know how hard that bike was rode and its mechanical geometry. an old 3speed in the womans frame would probably prove to be in good shape with less chance of having been rode hard and abused.
ogbigbird is offline  
Old 09-26-08, 07:36 PM
  #22  
EraserGirl
Registered User
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Methuen, MA
Posts: 387

Bikes: Armstrong, Robin Hood, Hercules, Phillips

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by ogbigbird View Post
here is a random bit of info i heard around, but it makes a lot of sense: bikes with "girls" frames are typically in better, untampered shape, than a bike with a conventional frame. the logic on this was that a young man or boy will be more likly to either be really hard on the bike and wear it out and more likely to "tinker" on it, therefor sometimes making it mechanically shady. an old mountain bike with flat bars, nice geometry and fat tire would be about perfect, as long as you know how hard that bike was rode and its mechanical geometry. an old 3speed in the womans frame would probably prove to be in good shape with less chance of having been rode hard and abused.

i agree with this, i am finding the numbers bear this up.

I have started calling bikes where you could wear a skirt comfortably 'women's' bikes
and ones with bars higher up, merely step through frames.
no sense being unnecessarily sexist.
EraserGirl is offline  
Old 09-26-08, 07:57 PM
  #23  
Ex Pres
#39
 
Ex Pres's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Mountain Brook, AL
Posts: 7,122
Mentioned: 23 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 345 Post(s)
Liked 7 Times in 6 Posts
Originally Posted by EraserGirl View Post
i agree with this, i am finding the numbers bear this up.

I have started calling bikes where you could wear a skirt comfortably 'women's' bikes
and ones with bars higher up, merely step through frames.
no sense being unnecessarily sexist.
Nowadays those are called compact frames.
Ex Pres is offline  
Old 09-26-08, 08:48 PM
  #24  
USAZorro
Señor Member
 
USAZorro's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Florence, KY
Posts: 16,214

Bikes: Mostly English - predominantly Raleighs

Mentioned: 48 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 695 Post(s)
Liked 8 Times in 8 Posts
Originally Posted by alanbikehouston View Post
When I started buying older bikes, I did not give a lot of thought to the time and money it takes to restore a bike to "runs like new" condition. I've learned the hard way that buying an old bike for $100, and then spending $200 to get it into good riding condition costs more than a $150 bike that is in PERFECT condition.

Visit every bike shop within five miles of your home, and tell them you are looking for an older bike in great riding condition. If a shop does not have such a bike this month, they might get one in next month. Also, check out the Salvation Army, Goodwill, and other resale stores. Look for the bikes that look PERFECT. If you are willing to take your time, you will find bikes that probably have been ridden less than 20 miles during their lifespan.

An easy "test" of a bikes quality are the rims and weight. Good bikes have aluminum rims (bring a magnet to Goodwill if you are not sure how to tell). Really good bikes weigh between 20 pounds and 25 pounds, and decent bikes weight from 25 pounds to 29 pounds. If a bike weighs 50 pounds, even if it IS a "real" Schwinn, it will not be fun to ride.
This is good advice, but if you are at all willing to do some basic and simple maintenance yourself, finding a bike in less than perfect condition is viable. Not a basket case mind you, but a less than perfect finish, a cruddy chain, beat tires and bearings that need service aren't necessarily deal breakers. Definitely keep the total cost in mind, but don't spend months discarding bikes that could be great with just a little work because they're not perfect.
__________________
In search of what to search for.
USAZorro is offline  
Old 09-27-08, 06:41 AM
  #25  
prettyshady
12345
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: south france
Posts: 1,248
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by cb400bill View Post
What if you live in France?
lol

I don't buy parts of ebay any more. It either get's too expensive and/or its broken in some way.

For some fun advice, if a bikes name end with a vowel, its probally italian
prettyshady is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.