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Your Catch of the Day / Saved from the Dump!

Old 04-16-10, 11:26 AM
  #4376  
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I dig the wind chime kevinsubaru! The stem is identical to the one on my Santana, which explains the 1 1/4" steerer.
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Old 04-16-10, 11:47 AM
  #4377  
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Originally Posted by kevinsubaru
Snagged this at the Copake swap today. The seller said it was a 1937, and I have no reason to doubt the decade at least. Its a rider, which is nice! It just needs a serious cleaning, and removal of what looks like crackled house paint all over it. I can see the original paint under it, so that's a plus I didn't get a screaming deal, but it was much cheaper/easier to buy this complete than it would be to piece it together.


Nice bike. I am looking forward to seeing how that onion peels.
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Old 04-16-10, 11:48 AM
  #4378  
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Hi,
I am new to this game, but I started building up an 83 Apollo recently. My wife's friend said she had an old bike to give me. It turned out to be a 88 pinarello treviso. A cleanup, new rubber and tubes and it is good to go. Too bad it is too small for me (54cm) but it works for my wife. Now I am hooked. I want to find a 64cm columbus tube frame to replace my Apollo!

Pb
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Old 04-16-10, 11:54 AM
  #4379  
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Originally Posted by wrk101
A Cannondale for $10 bucks??? WOW!!! If it can be returned to ride-able condition, that would be my recommendation. Chains and seats are cheap, I don't know what else it needs other than a thorough cleanup.
I was excited to see this one. From the grainy CL add it looked like a broken Next suspension bike. When I turned the corner into the backyard and saw Cannondale I was excited inside, but went to the two rusty junkers first. I couldn't believe it when he said yes to $10. I will only part it out if the headshock and steering are beyond repair. More than likely it is just some rusty stiff bits inside.

Today is going to be a good day. I am going to pick up a pair of Peugeot road bikes for $5 total after work.
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Old 04-16-10, 12:45 PM
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Bought at a local antiquities dealer for the equivalent of 35 dollars.

Haven't done much to it except polish the fenders, put some air into the tyres and install new handles.
Runs smoothly.

Dürkopp is a German bicycle factory that stopped producing bikes in 1961, in order to concentrate on the production of industrial sewing machines. This means that this bike cannot be less than 50 years old.

I have no idea what parts are original and what parts have been added later.
My guess is that the crank set is new and that everything else is pretty much original.








I find it pretty strange that the crank set has both Sugino and Centurion brands on it... can anyone explain this?
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Old 04-16-10, 01:13 PM
  #4381  
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Whatisname, your crank is (as you say) much newer than the bike. It was made by Sugino for Centurion, and originally it was on a Centurion bicycle.

I'd like to see more photographs of our bike; it looks very nice. There's another thread going now, about a Durkopp from about 1951 that a forum member recently acquired for a similar price.
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Old 04-16-10, 01:37 PM
  #4382  
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Originally Posted by element-82
Hi,
I am new to this game, but I started building up an 83 Apollo recently. My wife's friend said she had an old bike to give me. It turned out to be a 88 pinarello treviso. A cleanup, new rubber and tubes and it is good to go. Too bad it is too small for me (54cm) but it works for my wife. Now I am hooked. I want to find a 64cm columbus tube frame to replace my Apollo!

Pb
Wow element-82 - most of us start out with more modest aims - but there's nothing wrong with searching for another Pinarello! Good luck!
Welcome to C&V - (As you can see it does not take much to get hooked! )
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Old 04-16-10, 02:51 PM
  #4383  
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Today's findings are all ladies' bikes with upright bars. I'll post pictures in the next few days.

First is a Schwinn Breeze, single speed, coaster brake. It has a hitch for a trailer. Trailer is long gone, but this could come in useful for a project.

Second is a "Cycle Pro" 3-speed bike. Has a Shimano hub, the old, crappy kind. This bike is almost Huffy-ish.

Third is an English 3-speed. I am headed into New York City, where rhm locked it up on the street for me to pick up. I'll ride it from there to my mother's place to meet her (and my wife) for dinner.

The owners of these bikes are just giving them to me. I'm a bike magnet!
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Old 04-16-10, 03:44 PM
  #4384  
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Bianchi! Freebie. might have the wrong rims, it came with some other road bikes


Last edited by HSean; 04-16-10 at 03:44 PM. Reason: Apples
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Old 04-16-10, 03:48 PM
  #4385  
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€74 for a 93-94 Cannondale (? looking at the cantilever rear dropout thingies, thatīs what tells me itīs from around those years), with what look like dual pivot brakes, and a crankset/BB, seatpost clamp, DT cable stops, clip pedals, a RD and FD. Happy days, itīs in my size too.

Better pics to follow on pickup (local) next week:

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Old 04-16-10, 04:31 PM
  #4386  
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What a great "Catch" day for me.
First a Cannondale for $10.
Then tonight I picked up this pair of Peugeot PR500 Altus road bikes for $2.50 each.
I felt obligated to buy the Haro Fusion for $15.
$30 for four bikes.


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Old 04-16-10, 04:43 PM
  #4387  
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Those custom made hubs... all shiny now.



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Old 04-16-10, 04:43 PM
  #4388  
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Originally Posted by kingfish254
What a great "Catch" day for me.
First a Cannondale for $10.
Then tonight I picked up this pair of Peugeot PR500 Altus road bikes for $2.50 each.
I felt obligated to buy the Haro Fusion for $15.
$30 for four bikes.


Ok, you need to sell me one of those Peugeots....
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Old 04-16-10, 05:54 PM
  #4389  
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Originally Posted by Sixty Fiver
Those custom made hubs... all shiny now.
Tommy-bar nuts on the hub axle?
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Old 04-16-10, 06:30 PM
  #4390  
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Originally Posted by JohnDThompson
Tommy-bar nuts on the hub axle?
John - These are cartridge bearing hubs and those are boltsthat also have a 15mm flat.

The first time I saw these I wondered why an allen bolt wasn't used but now see what a brilliant design they are.

If you carry a multi - tool or have a screwdriver handy you can remove the wheels pretty quickly and never have to worry about stripping a bolt head... dis-assembling these hubs is amazingly simple and easy and does not require any special tools.

Each hub has a fixed spacer and a removable spacer, with one spacer removed the entire axle can be popped out with a little tap and servicing these hubs is about as easy as it gets... not that high quality cartridge bearings will need much service.

They roll like butter on glass and are quite light... the fellow who builds these (engineer, machinist, and a 30 year frame builder) designed them for tandem and touring use and I know folks who have been running the hell out of them for decades.

Arvon started building hubs when Phil Wood did and started building tandems when Santana started up... if he did not work in a small town in Alberta, Canada I am sure his work would be better known than it already is.

I am always pleased when he stops by my shop for his weekly coffee and chat... he also raced professionally in the 50's and 60's against some legends and has many interesting stories to tell.

At 75 (and 275 pounds) he can still tear my freaking legs off on a ride and still lays down more mileage than most.

This is his personal ride... it also sports those custom hubs and a quad speed crank. He draws his own oval tubing and stays and if he wanted to could pretty much build a bike from scratch as he could machine and build every part.

We can ride the same size frame so I got to take this bike for a spin the other day... it is an amazing ride

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Old 04-16-10, 07:26 PM
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Snagged this bike yesterday. It's previous owner wasn't into bike at all and he didn't know how to use this bike properly. Anyhow I took off from him and cleaned up a bit. Now it looks beautiful...

Before:



After:

Last edited by ahson; 04-16-10 at 07:31 PM.
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Old 04-16-10, 07:56 PM
  #4392  
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^^ Nice looking bike, but I'm pretty sure it is WAY to small for you. But to each his own, if that set up is comfortable for you then go nuts.
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Old 04-16-10, 09:45 PM
  #4393  
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I was on a road ride with a group yesterday & someone told me it looked like my bike frame was too big because it didn't have that much seatpost sticking out....I explained the difference between classic road bike geometry and girls bikes...uh, err...I mean mountain bikes.....i mean, compact geometry..... Actually, i've come to appreciate that there are many ways to make frames fit a rider, so combined with the many preferences of riders, it's hard to say much unless the rider is actually suffering some ill consequence from the setup.
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Old 04-16-10, 09:52 PM
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Originally Posted by fiataccompli
I was on a road ride with a group yesterday & someone told me it looked like my bike frame was too big because it didn't have that much seatpost sticking out....I explained the difference between classic road bike geometry and girls bikes...uh, err...I mean mountain bikes.....i mean, compact geometry..... Actually, i've come to appreciate that there are many ways to make frames fit a rider, so combined with the many preferences of riders, it's hard to say much unless the rider is actually suffering some ill consequence from the setup.
Classic set up with a fist full of seatpost...

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Old 04-16-10, 09:54 PM
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Just updating cause I don't want to make a thread that's not specifically bicycle centric. I got the parts I ordered today so was able to finish putting together the Velosolex.

It runs with all of the might you would expect of a 68lbs. 0.8 horsepower motor-bicycle.... It'll be a nice sunday driver.

Oh and you can't see it, but yes the rims have dimpled braking surfaces in the finest (read: most annoying) French tradition. The front brake is a bizarre and hefty caliper brake unlike anything I've ever seen before.

Last edited by Mos6502; 04-16-10 at 09:59 PM.
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Old 04-16-10, 10:14 PM
  #4396  
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Courtesy of my WTB bikes ad on the local CL I bought a repainted Peugeot PX10 in my size that has been partially upgraded to Campagnolo NR parts. The seller included all of the stock Simplex, Mafac, Stronglight, and Ava parts as well as some others.

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Old 04-16-10, 11:36 PM
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Originally Posted by 4Rings6Stars
^^ Nice looking bike, but I'm pretty sure it is WAY to small for you. But to each his own, if that set up is comfortable for you then go nuts.
You're right, bike is a bit too small for me (6'3) as it's a 56cm. However after the seatpost adjustment, it feels/rides nice. Does it look awkward when a tall person rides a bike size like this?

I am still trying to feel the bike to determine whether it really fits me or not. It's not an easy thing to find the perfect frame size for myself as I am those people with short torso, long legs. I had a hard time on a 62cm because I needed to hunch over a lottt but my legs/seat height were perfect on it.

Last edited by ahson; 04-16-10 at 11:47 PM.
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Old 04-17-10, 08:01 AM
  #4398  
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I found a Vagabond single speed coaster brake bike next to an apartment building dumpster yesterday on my way to work. I believe these were sold in Canada by Home Hardware which is a retail chain of stores. The The frame is in excellent condition. The wheels are rusted and pitted but can be restored. The front tire would not hold air so I just swapped the wheel with with one that has a good tube and tire installed from another dumpster bike. I will replace the back tire eventually.

After the fore mentioned maintenance, I basically had to just tighten the fender bolts to the frame, clamp the torque arm to the chainstay, replace a missing handgrip, oil the chain and replace the old seat with a newer one. The coaster brake seems to work well but I am going to install a front handbrake just in case it ever fails. The back wheel is slightly wobbly and there is some play in the rear wheel hub. I think the cones just need to be tightened a bit to reduce the play in the rear wheel. Other than that it works just fine and dandy.

My camera will only shoot video now so here is a short clip if anyone is interested.
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Old 04-17-10, 08:05 AM
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ahson -

As I mentioned in my original comment..if you're comfortable, who cares. It does look a little awkward with that much seat post sticking out on a bike with classic geometry but as long as there is enough seat post inserted looking a little awkward is all you have to worry about.
Sounds like you should be on the lookout for frame with a shorter top tube than seat tube or you could put a very short reach stem on 62cm+ frame. (or get a custom built frame but who has that kind of money?)
This forum has trained me to only find the 'fistfull of seat post' that Sixty Fiver mentioned aesthetically pleasing but comfort and practicality are much more important because, after all bikes are meant to be ridden and not hung on a wall.

Okay back to catches of the day, I'm clogging up my favorite thread!!! Here is my little project frame I picked up this week for a song. Should be fun rehabilitation.



I think the chain spent 30 or 40 years at the bottom of the ocean though...I don't have any tools to get this thing off as it busted my chain tool instantly. I guess I'll be heading to the hardware store for a hacksaw or some bolt cutters?
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Old 04-17-10, 08:15 AM
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Originally Posted by 4Rings6Stars
ahson -


I think the chain spent 30 or 40 years at the bottom of the ocean though...I don't have any tools to get this thing off as it busted my chain tool instantly. I guess I'll be heading to the hardware store for a hacksaw or some bolt cutters?
Yep.. I dont even bother using any chain tool on chains in such shape, I just snip em off with bolt cutters, or even a fair sized pair of plyers will work.
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