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Alco cycle/Cycle Products/Tricycle

Old 04-13-04, 08:08 AM
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Alco cycle/Cycle Products/Tricycle

I have acquired an "Alco" cycle adult tricycle of Largo, Florida.
Also has a sticket indicating Cycle Products, Inc of Largo, Fl
This is a 24 inch cycle, hi-rise handle bar, and currently has a partial setup for an electric or gas motor. It also has a 3 speed shifter on it.
I am unable to trace the manufacturer or obtain any info via the web.

Would appreciate any info/help available for this unit. I wish to rebuild it for use in Shrine Parades, etc.

Please reply to Stumbles@cox.net
Thanks a lot
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Old 12-21-04, 02:10 PM
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Stumbles:

Hope you're still around. I can give you some info on Alco Cycle Products. I worked there in the early 70's (71, 72, 73).

Al Cook Sr had a small shop in Clearwater Fl. in the 50's and 60's, his son Al Cook Jr expanded out to multiple retail stores and a factory in the 60's and 70's. The factory was Alco Cycle Products and was located in Largo Fl. behind the old Fairgrounds.(all the stores,factory and fairgrounds are gone now.

I started in the paint shop, became head of the paint dept, moved to shipping and recieving (helped out in the machine shop too) and finally moved to the new retail warehouse (then being the good hippy I was-I got really stoned one weekend and took off with a touring rock band and never went back).

The trikes were built in our factory from Al Cook Jr.'s designs. The frames were custom cut, bent, gusseted, welded and braized by a crew of madmen. The wheels were spoked, trued and balanced by a group of women who flirted with us and drove us poor hippies crazy.

The trike you have went through a series of acid bathes and was then hand painted using a electrostatic paint process and then baked. Chances are that I painted your trike--hope it still looks good.

Assembly was a 2 person operation done on a fixed line (10 trikes to a line). My girl friend at the time (Karen Miller) assembled the front end-wheel, handlebar, brakes etc. My good friend Jimmy Aldrich assembled the rear--He was the lead madman and was known to build radical racing trikes and racing tandems.

The trikes were sold under the Alco name as well as private labels ( Burdines, Hammacher & Schlemmer etc.) and were very popular around retirement areas--not so popular with automobile drivers stuck behind them.

We also built a line of heavyduty trikes for industrial use and even a custom bike for the post office.

The frames, forks, chain guards and rear ends were all made in our shop so if you need to replace these you will need to find another trike for parts or maybe a local welder or machine shop can duplicate. These parts should have held up well (Doug, John, Pete and the rest of the nuts back in the welding shop did a good job and the frames were warranted for life)
Other parts like bearings, races, cups can probably be found through a general bolt screw and bearing outlet.
I don't recall who we bought our brake assembly,sprockets,pedals or seats from (but damn those big seats were comfortable). Replacments shouldn't be too hard to come by.

Just before I left the company there were rumors that the factory would move to Texas or be bought out by another maker. Whether this occured I don't know.I doubt it as I have made many searches and could find nothing past the early 70's for Alco.

I hope some of this helps--you have the makings of a very good and classic trike. I could go on and on (as I'm old, deaf, disabled, and boring) but I'll stop now---Thanks for bringing back some good memories.



Ps:Jimmy, Doug, John, Pete, Karen--if you out there--post a note--Still rockin' in the free world
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Old 07-24-07, 02:44 PM
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ALCO cycles

I had to laugh at China's post. I worked in the ALCO retail shop on US 19 in Clearwater in 1973 as a salesman, then ran off to West Palm Beach to help a friend (mailed the store keys back to Clearwater), stayed in WPB and sold ALCO Villager trikes for a year down there through the Palm Beach Peddler, then went on to other things.
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Old 02-22-19, 04:57 AM
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Could use some advice on an alco trike i just got

Originally Posted by Chinaman
Stumbles:

Hope you're still around. I can give you some info on Alco Cycle Products. I worked there in the early 70's (71, 72, 73).

Al Cook Sr had a small shop in Clearwater Fl. in the 50's and 60's, his son Al Cook Jr expanded out to multiple retail stores and a factory in the 60's and 70's. The factory was Alco Cycle Products and was located in Largo Fl. behind the old Fairgrounds.(all the stores,factory and fairgrounds are gone now.

I started in the paint shop, became head of the paint dept, moved to shipping and recieving (helped out in the machine shop too) and finally moved to the new retail warehouse (then being the good hippy I was-I got really stoned one weekend and took off with a touring rock band and never went back).

The trikes were built in our factory from Al Cook Jr.'s designs. The frames were custom cut, bent, gusseted, welded and braized by a crew of madmen. The wheels were spoked, trued and balanced by a group of women who flirted with us and drove us poor hippies crazy.

The trike you have went through a series of acid bathes and was then hand painted using a electrostatic paint process and then baked. Chances are that I painted your trike--hope it still looks good.

Assembly was a 2 person operation done on a fixed line (10 trikes to a line). My girl friend at the time (Karen Miller) assembled the front end-wheel, handlebar, brakes etc. My good friend Jimmy Aldrich assembled the rear--He was the lead madman and was known to build radical racing trikes and racing tandems.

The trikes were sold under the Alco name as well as private labels ( Burdines, Hammacher & Schlemmer etc.) and were very popular around retirement areas--not so popular with automobile drivers stuck behind them.

We also built a line of heavyduty trikes for industrial use and even a custom bike for the post office.

The frames, forks, chain guards and rear ends were all made in our shop so if you need to replace these you will need to find another trike for parts or maybe a local welder or machine shop can duplicate. These parts should have held up well (Doug, John, Pete and the rest of the nuts back in the welding shop did a good job and the frames were warranted for life)
Other parts like bearings, races, cups can probably be found through a general bolt screw and bearing outlet.
I don't recall who we bought our brake assembly,sprockets,pedals or seats from (but damn those big seats were comfortable). Replacments shouldn't be too hard to come by.

Just before I left the company there were rumors that the factory would move to Texas or be bought out by another maker. Whether this occured I don't know.I doubt it as I have made many searches and could find nothing past the early 70's for Alco.

I hope some of this helps--you have the makings of a very good and classic trike. I could go on and on (as I'm old, deaf, disabled, and boring) but I'll stop now---Thanks for bringing back some good memories.



Ps:Jimmy, Doug, John, Pete, Karen--if you out there--post a note--Still rockin' in the free world
Hello i just recently got an alco tricycle for a mear $25 from a friend of my grandfathers. It took me awhile to identify that it was an Alco because it was poorly spray painted black and i couldnt find an emblem or stamps of any kind. But I finally found a picture on the web that looked damn similar to my sweet find and turns out it is Alco! Funny thing is, I picked the thing up in Portland, Oregon. Thats pretty far from Florida! But anyways, i started disassambling the trike because i aim to strip all the old paint off and customize it to my liking, but i got to the rear axle and thats where i am having some trouble. I noticed from pictures on the web that it seems all the Alco trikes have a split axle, but the trike i have has a single solid axle in it. It only has threads on one side and i was able to get that wheel off, i figured i could pull the whole axle out on one side then i could get the other wheel off. But it seems pretty stuck for some reason. I am wondering if it is original or of along the years someone rebuilt it to their liking. Anyways any advice or knoweledge you've got would be a huge help! Thanks
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Old 02-22-19, 09:43 AM
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I don't know anything about Alco trikes, however, I'd like to see some pictures when you get to 10 posts. Keep posting and then post the pic's.

Typically, trikes will have two axles. One for each wheel. They will either have a differential in the center or drive one wheel only. It is unusual to have a solid axle because if you make a sharp turn the distance that the outside wheel makes is larger than the inside wheel and there is some scrubbing.

Hopefully, someone knows more than me.
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Old 05-09-19, 11:29 PM
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Villager axles

As I remember, after 40 years, the Alco Villager trikes had separate right & left axles, with the right one being driven, and the left wheel un-powered. Your single axle may be a later modification or repair by the owner. Current Schwinn & Sun trikes use a single axle, with the left wheel spinning freely on the axle. In the day, 1970s, the Villager design was the only trike designed from the ground up as a 3-wheeler, not a 2 wheel bike with a rear axle kit. That made them feel much more solid, less wiggle & wobble. I sold bunches of them in Clearwater & West Palm Beach Florida.
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Old 07-31-19, 09:35 AM
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Hope you're still around! just picked up villager"3" seems to be single speed, but can pedal backwards -big seat,hand brake for front wheel only paint is bad, chain guard intact, should I simply repair or go for full restoration? thanks in advance Larry
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Old 10-24-19, 11:26 AM
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Hi..I have the same Alcohol Villager 3 trike
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Old 10-24-19, 11:38 AM
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Hi...I also have the same bike...I have re-done mine I love it but when I took the seat off to re-do it I may have put parts somewhere in my garage...I don’t know what it is but I am not sure what I missed of these at assembly to complete...could tell me what are the Parts of the seat so that I can put it back together....have the seat and some sort of bracket with a few holes in it...would appreciate your response Cheers...you did build a great bike.
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Old 10-25-19, 06:39 AM
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do you need photos of the seat assembly? apparently I can't post photos until 10 posts.
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Old 10-28-19, 10:33 AM
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villager seat

The Miami Sun trikes use the same "tractor seat" system as the Villagers did - go to https://docplayer.net/21252344-Trike...ly-manual.html.
The only thing the Sun manual does not show clearly is how the bottom ends of the U-shaped seat support fastens to the frame - generally with 3/8" bolts.
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Old 05-05-20, 03:00 PM
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Hi All,

Figured I'd post here since we're on trikes. Just scored a trike here in Dunedin FL (see avatar for now). I plan to repaint. But one question, the un-propelled wheel bolt always wants to back itself out until the wheel almost comes off. Should I just use a thread locker? Or try to loosen the inner shaft bolt?
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Old 01-04-24, 04:42 PM
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I worked at Alco cycle products in the 70s

Originally Posted by Chinaman
Stumbles:


Hope you're still around. I can give you some info on Alco Cycle Products. I worked there in the early 70's (71, 72, 73).


Al Cook Sr had a small shop in Clearwater Fl. in the 50's and 60's, his son Al Cook Jr expanded out to multiple retail stores and a factory in the 60's and 70's. The factory was Alco Cycle Products and was located in Largo Fl. behind the old Fairgrounds.(all the stores,factory and fairgrounds are gone now.


I started in the paint shop, became head of the paint dept, moved to shipping and recieving (helped out in the machine shop too) and finally moved to the new retail warehouse (then being the good hippy I was-I got really stoned one weekend and took off with a touring rock band and never went back).


The trikes were built in our factory from Al Cook Jr.'s designs. The frames were custom cut, bent, gusseted, welded and braized by a crew of madmen. The wheels were spoked, trued and balanced by a group of women who flirted with us and drove us poor hippies crazy.


The trike you have went through a series of acid bathes and was then hand painted using a electrostatic paint process and then baked. Chances are that I painted your trike--hope it still looks good.


Assembly was a 2 person operation done on a fixed line (10 trikes to a line). My girl friend at the time (Karen Miller) assembled the front end-wheel, handlebar, brakes etc. My good friend Jimmy Aldrich assembled the rear--He was the lead madman and was known to build radical racing trikes and racing tandems.


The trikes were sold under the Alco name as well as private labels ( Burdines, Hammacher & Schlemmer etc.) and were very popular around retirement areas--not so popular with automobile drivers stuck behind them.


We also built a line of heavyduty trikes for industrial use and even a custom bike for the post office.


The frames, forks, chain guards and rear ends were all made in our shop so if you need to replace these you will need to find another trike for parts or maybe a local welder or machine shop can duplicate. These parts should have held up well (Doug, John, Pete and the rest of the nuts back in the welding shop did a good job and the frames were warranted for life)

Other parts like bearings, races, cups can probably be found through a general bolt screw and bearing outlet.

I don't recall who we bought our brake assembly,sprockets,pedals or seats from (but damn those big seats were comfortable). Replacments shouldn't be too hard to come by.


Just before I left the company there were rumors that the factory would move to Texas or be bought out by another maker. Whether this occured I don't know.I doubt it as I have made many searches and could find nothing past the early 70's for Alco.


I hope some of this helps--you have the makings of a very good and classic trike. I could go on and on (as I'm old, deaf, disabled, and boring) but I'll stop now---Thanks for bringing back some good memories.




Ps:Jimmy, Doug, John, Pete, Karen--if you out there--post a note--Still rockin' in the free world
I worked in the frame dept. as a brazer, on frames and wheel hubs! My name is Ron Tucker and I lived right down the street from the factory and I walked to work everyday! Talk skinny guy with long dark hair! Really enjoyed working there! I built a custom chopped trike with a extended fork ,while I was working there and rode it all over town! Got a lot of lookers riding it for sure! I saw your post and thought I would let you know that there is at least one other guy that used to work there that is still around! That was a long time ago, I now live in Tennessee!


​​​

​​​​
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