Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Classic & Vintage
Reload this Page >

Show off that Randonneur; and let's discuss the bike, the gear, the sport

Notices
Classic & Vintage This forum is to discuss the many aspects of classic and vintage bicycles, including musclebikes, lightweights, middleweights, hi-wheelers, bone-shakers, safety bikes and much more.

Show off that Randonneur; and let's discuss the bike, the gear, the sport

Old 06-18-15, 03:33 PM
  #376  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: S Oregon
Posts: 801

Bikes: Berthoud Randoneusse, Curt Goodrich steel road, Zanconato Minimax road, Jeff Lyon steel all road,

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 15 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Originally Posted by rhm
So this being a zombie thread and all, it has drifted to a discussion of bikes more than the sport, but still... anyone have anything to say about the sport?

I am new to RUSA and have so far completed two 200k and one 300k brevets, which is probably not enough to entitle me to an opinion. But I am not new to long distance riding, have done a century or two every month for several years as well as multi day tours and other riding.

And at this point I'm not sure I like RUSA-style events. The routes are designed for fast riding, emphasis on good pavement. Worse, they have to have a limited number of controles, so they tend to go the shortest route between controles, because otherwise people could take short cuts. All this has the effect of putting you on roads you might otherwise shun. And then you have to ride them with a cue sheet. I understand why this is, but it's not my favorite way of riding.

Anyone else have this experience?
I am new to long distance riding, and picked up the Berthoud specifically for more adventure oriented riding. i aim to complete my first 200k this fall. interesting info about the organized events. what are the other options for completing a brevet if not RUSA events? do you find there are a lot of short cutters?
MZilliox is offline  
Old 06-18-15, 03:37 PM
  #377  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: S Oregon
Posts: 801

Bikes: Berthoud Randoneusse, Curt Goodrich steel road, Zanconato Minimax road, Jeff Lyon steel all road,

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 15 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Originally Posted by rhm
I believe you are absolutely right about that.

And there's a neat thing: they allow you to set up and manage any number of "permanent" routes, so you can ride and get credit for the routes you like to ride regularly anyway; and other people can ride them the same way. Intrigued, I started designing a couple on RidewithGPS. And I started running into the limitations of the form right away. For example, one of my favorite roads is "Dune Road" on the south shore of Long Island. But there's really no way to put a controle on it, without actually being there. I'd have to settle for a controlle at each end, and give the rider credit for the shortest route between the two, and suggest the nice way to go is Dune Road. So they'd get credit for maybe 15 miles while they actually ride 20. Now, that's just an example... but it seems to me a good example of the kind of compromise you have to make when designing a ride, with the inevitable result that they feel compromised.

I wonder if RUSA will one day accept Strava data, or the like, as proof that you've done a ride.

And this brings up another point. Who tf cares? I don't ride for RUSA status, and I don't ride so I can post about it on the internet. I ride cuz I like it. Why should I compromise my rides so I can get RUSA credit for them?

the answer is, so I can do the PBP, of course. Which raises a new question; why tf would I want to do that?
@stevenh, I understand and agree. I should have mentioned, I'm essentially car-free, so all my rides start and end at my house. This can easily turn a 200k brevet into a 300k ride.
Also i was thinking the same about my riding. why would i shortcut for status? I like to ride. But it would be cool to qualify for PBP next time it happens, not this one, the one in 4plus years time, haha. as far as why tf would you do PBP... i guess its mainly about history, and its a goal to set.
MZilliox is offline  
Old 06-18-15, 03:41 PM
  #378  
rhm
multimodal commuter
 
rhm's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: NJ, NYC, LI
Posts: 19,852

Bikes: 1940s Fothergill, 1959 Allegro Special, 1963? Claud Butler Olympic Sprint, Lambert 'Clubman', 1974 Fuji "the Ace", 1976 Holdsworth 650b conversion rando bike, 1983 Trek 720 tourer, 1984 Counterpoint Opus II, 1993 Basso Gap, 2010 Downtube 8h, and...

Mentioned: 583 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1907 Post(s)
Liked 569 Times in 337 Posts
I don't know anything about short cutters! I just assume they are a potential problem, and that routes must be designed to minimize that problem.

As for adventure, my idea is to get on my bike and go far enough that I don't know where I am. There's no adventure (as I understand the term) on organized rides.
__________________
www.rhmsaddles.com.
rhm is offline  
Old 06-18-15, 03:48 PM
  #379  
Senior Member
 
bikemig's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Middle Earth (aka IA)
Posts: 20,490

Bikes: A bunch of old bikes and a few new ones

Mentioned: 178 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5872 Post(s)
Liked 3,426 Times in 2,055 Posts
I love my 1993 bridgestone XO-2. It's a fine bike for a long day in the saddle with road geometry (it has pretty nimble geometry) with fairly fat but lightweight 26 x 1.5 tires. I've put some pretty wide ranging gearing on it and find it can tackle pretty much anything. It reminds me more than a bit of the French 650b rando bikes as well:

Attached Images
File Type: jpg
BstoneXO2.jpg (95.9 KB, 1307 views)
bikemig is offline  
Old 06-18-15, 04:29 PM
  #380  
Bike Butcher of Portland
 
gugie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 11,596

Bikes: It's complicated.

Mentioned: 1294 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4643 Post(s)
Liked 5,634 Times in 2,238 Posts
Originally Posted by MZilliox
I never tire of this bike, thanks for sharing again, its one of my all time favorites
Thanks! The picture quality could be a lot better...I need to bone up on my skills!
__________________
If someone tells you that you have enough bicycles and you don't need any more, stop talking to them. You don't need that kind of negativity in your life.
gugie is offline  
Old 06-18-15, 05:19 PM
  #381  
Senior Member
 
eastbay71's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: SF Bay Area
Posts: 691

Bikes: the bikes own me

Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 18 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 4 Times in 3 Posts
I would like to get involved in randonneuring but the only reason I ever heard of it was because my Nishiki International came with a Nitto Ranndonneuring bar. Here she is I've done some upgrades but all were period correct.

eastbay71 is offline  
Old 06-18-15, 06:05 PM
  #382  
Senior Member
 
Vonruden's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Ocean County, NJ
Posts: 3,041

Bikes: Looking for a Baylis or Wizard in 59-62cm range

Mentioned: 64 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 373 Post(s)
Liked 325 Times in 112 Posts
I really really like that Jeff Lyon, very nice work Southpaw.

Here is my current rando project, just received the Stem, waiting on the hammered Honjo's to begin.







Vonruden is offline  
Old 06-18-15, 06:06 PM
  #383  
Uber Goober
 
StephenH's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Dallas area, Texas
Posts: 11,758
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 190 Post(s)
Liked 41 Times in 32 Posts
Originally Posted by rhm
But there's really no way to put a controle on it, without actually being there. I'd have to settle for a controlle at each end, and give the rider credit for the shortest route between the two, and suggest the nice way to go is Dune Road. So they'd get credit for maybe 15 miles while they actually ride 20.
I wonder if RUSA will one day accept Strava data, or the like, as proof that you've done a ride.

And this brings up another point. Who tf cares? I don't ride for RUSA status, and I don't ride so I can post about it on the internet. I ride cuz I like it. Why should I compromise my rides so I can get RUSA credit for them?

the answer is, so I can do the PBP, of course. Which raises a new question; why tf would I want to do that?
How you'd handle Dune Road is to put an information control in the middle of it. That only works if you just ride it one direction, you can't do that on an out and back. If it's absolutely featureless, you go put zip ties around a stop sign or something like that and then have the question on the card that says "How many zip ties around the stop sign at ___". The catch with this is it's fine for that point, but if you have two dozen information controls in 100 miles, it'd be really irritating.

The key is that you may have a perfectly fine riding route that does not make a good randonneuring route. For example, there's lots of people locally that like to go ride laps around White Rock Lake. That's a 10 mile loop. Well, that's just dandy, nothing wrong with that, but you can't make 12 loops of the route into a randonneuring route. So you find places where you don't have those problems, and that's what you turn into your randonneuring route, and forget the other.

On a normal perm or brevet, riders don't have the option of taking a suggested route and getting credit for the shortest distance- they're supposed to follow the designated route. It's the Free-Route Permanents that get into that.

The issue with Strava is an on-going question, you're not the first to think of it. Basically, there's a lot of people that think it should be done the old way and a lot that are in favor of Strava. The Strava record would probably be an option on perms, I don't foresee it being a required record for a long time. I don't use Strava at all, so don't have a lot of motivation to work it into rides.

"Who tf cares" about RUSA status, etc. You might also ask "Who tf cares about Strava?" But, different strokes for different folks. If you ride a lot of RUSA rides, then you start tallying up how much you have ridden and that's when you get motivated to go ride more of them, and get concerned with whether you're getting credit and all. If you've just done two or three, no big deal one way or the other.

"why tf would I want to do" PBP. That's a good question. Personally, I don't really care about it, and would be more interested in doing it if it was a 10-day tour or something. I've done one 1200k, DNF'ed two of them, and don't have a lot of desire to try another one (not to say I won't). But how that works is you go do a 600k and have fun and think "Yeah, let's go for more!" If you do the 600k and think "What a drag", that's okay, too, just don't figure on the 1200k and have fun riding other stuff. Personally, I find more often than not that a 200k is fun all the way through, and on 300k and longer, it seems the fun runs out before the miles do. So if I just stuck with 200k's from here on out, I could live with that. For a lot of people, the fact that PBP is in France is the attraction. American 1200k's will have maybe 40 or 50 riders in them, PBP will have around 6,000, and several hundred of those will be American.

Part of the "fun" of doing a long ride (or anything exceptionally challenging for you) is the sense of achievement in knowing you've done it, so the "fun" is not all at the moment. If you've done a lot of double centuries anyway, then you go do a 300k, you'd be missing that element. But if that 300k is longer than you've ever ridden in your life, and none of your cycling buddies have ever ridden anything that far, then it's a little different issue. I've got a friend that is trying to finish an Ironman, and I think that's a similar feeling there.

On the car-free- that will affect your outlook. But for example, I'm here in the Dallas-Fort Worth area, and we have rides that start in Canton, about 40 miles east of here, and rides that start in Mineral Wells, about 100 miles west of here, and all in between. So we're usually doing a LOT of driving to get to a ride start- typically an hour or so. Trying to ride out of the metroplex is a pain, but if I drive an hour south, why, there's good riding down there. It also means that essentially all of my riding is recreational, which gives me a little different outlook. If I had to ride from my house all the time, that'd put a real damper on choice of rides and involve a lot of extra effort to do them.
__________________
"be careful this rando stuff is addictive and dan's the 'pusher'."
StephenH is offline  
Old 06-18-15, 07:32 PM
  #384  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: STP
Posts: 15,222
Mentioned: 74 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 821 Post(s)
Liked 253 Times in 141 Posts
Originally Posted by rhm
As for adventure, my idea is to get on my bike and go far enough that I don't know where I am. There's no adventure (as I understand the term) on organized rides.
That describes my style perfectly.

I'm mainly into gravel and country roads. That's where the action is for me, especially if you throw in fire roads.

I'm riding pretty good distances again, although not quite up to full centuries on gravel.

Great bikes in the thread everyone. Please keep the eye candy coming.
gomango is offline  
Old 06-18-15, 08:11 PM
  #385  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 17,075
Mentioned: 476 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3761 Post(s)
Liked 6,409 Times in 2,539 Posts
The last couple of years of long distance riding (not organized brevets, but 100K, 100 mile, 200k, and 300k rides), I've tended to choose bikes in my fleet that are among the lightest weight but can fit 30-32mm tires. These usually aren't equipped with fenders, racks, etc., so I go with a Carradice saddle bag.

For a 300K, I was on my Wes Mason (friction shifting, 6-speed rear cluster):


For a hilly century, I was on my Merlin Ti:


And for this year's 300k, I'm thinking of riding my fairly new to me Lemond Buenos Aires, converted to 650B x 38 though I plan to fit it with a front lamp and a generator front hub:


I have done a couple of 200K rides on my Rivendell Romulus, which is fendered, but I do find that at those inevitable fatigue points, the heavier bikes take their toll, and I'd rather avoid that.
nlerner is offline  
Old 06-19-15, 05:21 AM
  #386  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: STP
Posts: 15,222
Mentioned: 74 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 821 Post(s)
Liked 253 Times in 141 Posts
My son has put over 1,100 miles on his Della Santa in the last three weeks including a 500 mile round trip to our cabin near the BWCA.

While he isn't in a formal RUSA club, he surely should be.

I think he would do quite well. These soccer players are all legs and lungs.

[IMG]DSCN6669 by gomango1849, on Flickr[/IMG]
gomango is offline  
Old 06-19-15, 06:50 AM
  #387  
rhm
multimodal commuter
 
rhm's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: NJ, NYC, LI
Posts: 19,852

Bikes: 1940s Fothergill, 1959 Allegro Special, 1963? Claud Butler Olympic Sprint, Lambert 'Clubman', 1974 Fuji "the Ace", 1976 Holdsworth 650b conversion rando bike, 1983 Trek 720 tourer, 1984 Counterpoint Opus II, 1993 Basso Gap, 2010 Downtube 8h, and...

Mentioned: 583 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1907 Post(s)
Liked 569 Times in 337 Posts
Stephen, I agree on all points.

Originally Posted by StephenH
How you'd handle Dune Road is to put an information control in the middle of it. That only works if you just ride it one direction, you can't do that on an out and back. If it's absolutely featureless, you go put zip ties around a stop sign or something like that and then have the question on the card that says "How many zip ties around the stop sign at ___". The catch with this is it's fine for that point, but if you have two dozen information controls in 100 miles, it'd be really irritating.
Yeah, I understand information controles, but don't have much practical experience with them. Putting one on Dune road is certainly an option, though maintaining it --checking that the zip ties are still there, for example-- would involve a 40 mile excursion for me, to ensure someone didn't take a five mile short cut, might not be worth it. The easier solution is to make a free-route permanent with a couple unproblematic controles (such as the Shelter Island ferry) where the shortest route that hits all the controles is 97 miles (with some nasty bits), but my suggested route is more like 110 (and quite lovely).

Originally Posted by StephenH
The issue with Strava ... [and] about RUSA status, etc. You might also ask "Who tf cares about Strava?" But, different strokes for different folks. If you ride a lot of RUSA rides, then you start tallying up how much you have ridden and that's when you get motivated to go ride more of them, and get concerned with whether you're getting credit and all. If you've just done two or three, no big deal one way or the other.
RUSA is the only club I belong to. As a new member, I have some misgivings about it, that I thought might be interesting to discuss, and I am intentionally having this discussion here, rather than the long distance riding sub-forum, because I believe there'll be a wider range of opinion here. I certainly I don't mean to complain.

I know what you mean. Strangely, the way numbers add up is a motivation in itself. Both RUSA and Strava have rankings of various kinds, and we do similar things with threads like the monthly miles one@TimmyT started on this sub-forum, the perennial commuting mileage threads, and so on. When I say "who cares!" I really don't disparage it at all; my point is only that these may or may not be things any of us cares about, and there's nothing wrong with that either way.

Originally Posted by StephenH
"why tf would I want to do" PBP. That's a good question. ...
PBP is a unique case, I think, since it has such a long history and big following. It is the randonneuring equivalent to the Hajj. If I were a really devoted randonneur, my rhetorical question would be tantamount to sacrilege. Just the fact that I can ask it, I think, shows my lack of commitment. L'Eroica is similar for true C&V worshipers and my attitude is similar; I agree with the dogma, but lack the zeal.
__________________
www.rhmsaddles.com.
rhm is offline  
Old 06-19-15, 09:50 AM
  #388  
working on my sandal tan
 
ThermionicScott's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: CID
Posts: 22,611

Bikes: 1991 Bianchi Eros, 1964 Armstrong, 1988 Diamondback Ascent, 1988 Bianchi Premio, 1987 Bianchi Sport SX, 1980s Raleigh mixte (hers), All-City Space Horse (hers)

Mentioned: 98 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3867 Post(s)
Liked 2,549 Times in 1,570 Posts
Allow me to sully this thread of beautiful French and other custom-built bikes with my misfit POS...



After my first rando season, I decided I wanted something with fenders and tires wider than 28mm. But I was overcome with cheapness, so instead of building up a 650B bike like I maybe should have, I scored some Sun AT-18 650A rims and Panaracer Col de la Vie tires and complemented them with some Weinmann centerpulls and VO Zeppelin fenders.

Drivetrain has evolved to a 50/38 crank and 13-28 7-speed cassette. That gives a range of 35" (supposedly the low gear that Velocio recommended) to 100" at the top, all using "road" drivetrain parts. Look at those ugly mismatched chainrings! But they shift alright:



RD and cassette detail. If you look closely, you can see where I had to slice open the left fender eyelet to get the remnants of a stuck bolt out, so now I have this kluged bolt-and-nut on one side to mount it:



When I first built this bike I was on a friction-shifting kick, so running 6-speed 105 parts (in friction mode) with a 7-speed cassette was no big deal. Of course, I got the indexed-shifting bug again, and had to replace the rear shifter, but was too lazy to undo a perfectly good left shifter:



My super-classy light mount. The brand name is "Nob" or somesuch. Mounting these on fork blades is discouraged because they can slide down and get into the spokes, so my solution was to build up the area below it with some handlebar and electrical tape so that it can't. So far so good:



Can you believe that I cocked up the lacing on both wheels? Oh well, I can still get to both of the valves okay, but I wish I'd noticed this before final tensioning:



The KlickFix handlebar mounting is working fine, but I'm plagued with a little doubt over whether I should go to a front rack and decaleur for more stability:



The B5N that is as old as I am is comfortable and holding up well. I plan to replace it with a new B17N if it ever gives up the ghost:



Despite my complaints, the bike does perform well overall. It doesn't seem to present undue rolling or bearing resistance, and the larger tires (inflated to 40psi in front and 50 lbs in rear, rider plus fully-equipped bike weighing 190 lbs together) were a welcome relief on Iowa's cracked or seamed roads. I did my whole SR series this year on it, and felt fresh enough to ride more after each brevet.
__________________
Originally Posted by chandltp
There's no such thing as too far.. just lack of time
Originally Posted by noglider
People in this forum are not typical.
RUSA #7498

Last edited by ThermionicScott; 06-19-15 at 10:07 AM.
ThermionicScott is offline  
Old 06-19-15, 10:04 AM
  #389  
Aspiring curmudgeon
 
icepick_trotsky's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Saint Louis
Posts: 2,686

Bikes: Guerciotti, Serotta, Gaulzetti

Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 111 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 23 Times in 11 Posts
Originally Posted by Vonruden




Beaut. Are you going to get the matching seatpost?
__________________
"Party on comrades" -- Lenin, probably
icepick_trotsky is offline  
Old 06-19-15, 10:07 AM
  #390  
Senior Member
 
3speedslow's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Jacksonville, NC
Posts: 9,334

Bikes: A few

Mentioned: 117 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1936 Post(s)
Liked 1,039 Times in 624 Posts
ThermionScott,


Question^^^ what are the numbers about on your stem ? Love the old saddle !
3speedslow is offline  
Old 06-19-15, 10:16 AM
  #391  
working on my sandal tan
 
ThermionicScott's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: CID
Posts: 22,611

Bikes: 1991 Bianchi Eros, 1964 Armstrong, 1988 Diamondback Ascent, 1988 Bianchi Premio, 1987 Bianchi Sport SX, 1980s Raleigh mixte (hers), All-City Space Horse (hers)

Mentioned: 98 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3867 Post(s)
Liked 2,549 Times in 1,570 Posts
Originally Posted by 3speedslow
ThermionScott,

Question^^^ what are the numbers about on your stem ? Love the old saddle !
Thanks! The little piece of paper taped to my stem is a gear chart. It shows the gear-inches for each combination. Mostly an exercise in dorkiness.
__________________
Originally Posted by chandltp
There's no such thing as too far.. just lack of time
Originally Posted by noglider
People in this forum are not typical.
RUSA #7498
ThermionicScott is offline  
Old 06-19-15, 10:49 AM
  #392  
Banned
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 7,150
Mentioned: 93 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1361 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 422 Times in 282 Posts
^LOL - So that confirms me as a dork too!

Attached Images
File Type: jpg
IMG_0005sm.jpg (97.8 KB, 947 views)
crank_addict is offline  
Old 06-19-15, 10:58 AM
  #393  
working on my sandal tan
 
ThermionicScott's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: CID
Posts: 22,611

Bikes: 1991 Bianchi Eros, 1964 Armstrong, 1988 Diamondback Ascent, 1988 Bianchi Premio, 1987 Bianchi Sport SX, 1980s Raleigh mixte (hers), All-City Space Horse (hers)

Mentioned: 98 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3867 Post(s)
Liked 2,549 Times in 1,570 Posts
Originally Posted by crank_addict
^LOL - So that confirms me as a dork too!



Here's a better picture of mine (and the handlebar bag attachment), BTW:

__________________
Originally Posted by chandltp
There's no such thing as too far.. just lack of time
Originally Posted by noglider
People in this forum are not typical.
RUSA #7498
ThermionicScott is offline  
Old 06-19-15, 11:12 AM
  #394  
Senior Member
 
Vonruden's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Ocean County, NJ
Posts: 3,041

Bikes: Looking for a Baylis or Wizard in 59-62cm range

Mentioned: 64 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 373 Post(s)
Liked 325 Times in 112 Posts
I'm looking for a nice matching Lugged seat post, may wait to see how the reach is with current stem and post.
Vonruden is offline  
Old 06-19-15, 11:23 AM
  #395  
Uber Goober
 
StephenH's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Dallas area, Texas
Posts: 11,758
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 190 Post(s)
Liked 41 Times in 32 Posts
Originally Posted by MZilliox
I am new to long distance riding, and picked up the Berthoud specifically for more adventure oriented riding. i aim to complete my first 200k this fall. interesting info about the organized events. what are the other options for completing a brevet if not RUSA events? do you find there are a lot of short cutters?
You may find randonneuring in Oregon to be a lot different from Texas or New York, in terms of terrain, routes, etc. Just check into it and see. Fewer people, more hills, that kind of thing.
RUSA is the US randonneuring organization, there's not any other. A lot of the US brevets are also recognized by ACP (the French organization). The Canadian provinces have their own randonneuring organizations if you care to ride up there. Look up Machka in the Long Distance forum, she can give you more information on them.
There are other long-distance rides that are not randonneuring events. On the west coast are quite a few double-centuries, you have RAMROD up there in Oregon, Portland-Seattle, etc.
In addition, there are quite a few long-distance races around the country. Look up the Ultra Marathon Cycling Association for information on them. Typically, timed events for the shorter ones (ie, 6-hour, 12-hour) or 200-500 miles or so for the longer ones.
__________________
"be careful this rando stuff is addictive and dan's the 'pusher'."
StephenH is offline  
Old 06-19-15, 11:28 AM
  #396  
Senior Member
 
bikemig's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Middle Earth (aka IA)
Posts: 20,490

Bikes: A bunch of old bikes and a few new ones

Mentioned: 178 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5872 Post(s)
Liked 3,426 Times in 2,055 Posts
Originally Posted by ThermionicScott
Allow me to sully this thread of beautiful French and other custom-built bikes with my misfit POS...



After my first rando season, I decided I wanted something with fenders and tires wider than 28mm. But I was overcome with cheapness, so instead of building up a 650B bike like I maybe should have, I scored some Sun AT-18 650A rims and Panaracer Col de la Vie tires and complemented them with some Weinmann centerpulls and VO Zeppelin fenders.

Drivetrain has evolved to a 50/38 crank and 13-28 7-speed cassette. That gives a range of 35" (supposedly the low gear that Velocio recommended) to 100" at the top, all using "road" drivetrain parts. Look at those ugly mismatched chainrings! But they shift alright:

RD and cassette detail. If you look closely, you can see where I had to slice open the left fender eyelet to get the remnants of a stuck bolt out, so now I have this kluged bolt-and-nut on one side to mount it:


When I first built this bike I was on a friction-shifting kick, so running 6-speed 105 parts (in friction mode) with a 7-speed cassette was no big deal. Of course, I got the indexed-shifting bug again, and had to replace the rear shifter, but was too lazy to undo a perfectly good left shifter:

My super-classy light mount. The brand name is "Nob" or somesuch. Mounting these on fork blades is discouraged because they can slide down and get into the spokes, so my solution was to build up the area below it with some handlebar and electrical tape so that it can't. So far so good:

Can you believe that I cocked up the lacing on both wheels? Oh well, I can still get to both of the valves okay, but I wish I'd noticed this before final tensioning:

KlickFix handlebar mounting is working fine, but I'm plagued with a little doubt over whether I should go to a front rack and decaleur for more stability:
The B5N that is as old as I am is comfortable and holding up well. I plan to replace it with a new B17N if it ever gives up the ghost:

Despite my complaints, the bike does perform well overall. It doesn't seem to present undue rolling or bearing resistance, and the larger tires (inflated to 40psi in front and 50 lbs in rear, rider plus fully-equipped bike weighing 190 lbs together) were a welcome relief on Iowa's cracked or seamed roads. I did my whole SR series this year on it, and felt fresh enough to ride more after each brevet.
That is an awesome bike cuz you're riding it on PBP; some of the rest of us (that would include me) are just dreamers.That's a great bike and I love all the kludges. This is a bike that does the job,

Last edited by bikemig; 06-19-15 at 11:35 AM.
bikemig is offline  
Old 06-19-15, 12:09 PM
  #397  
Senior Member
 
southpawboston's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Somerville, MA and Catskill Mtns
Posts: 4,150
Mentioned: 34 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 78 Post(s)
Liked 180 Times in 87 Posts
Originally Posted by jeirvine
Nice light. I may have missed it, but where do you sell such things?
I will have a web store set up soon, but I wanted to wait until I could launch both the taillight and switch simultaneously. Since the switch is having production delays, I am selling the taillight just through email. Most of the interest in my stuff comes from various bike lists, flickr and the randonneuring community. If you're interested, you can hit me up with a PM.
southpawboston is offline  
Old 06-19-15, 12:36 PM
  #398  
Banned
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 7,150
Mentioned: 93 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1361 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 422 Times in 282 Posts
Many neat older 700c road bikes suffice for rando or light tour. One that I consider excellent is a Panasonic made Schwinn Super Sport of 1980ish. Great geometry, Tange Champion 2, all the right eyelets. They came with Suntour Cyclone + triple ring.

Anyways, here's a few pics of a '72 LeChampion acquired last year with the intention of being my all-rounder. Still trying different set-ups but so far I love it. Not worried if it gets a few scratch's. Was caught in lots of rain this Spring so I'm doing my best to keep it sprayed down with WD40 and wax. Lucky it came with a Swiss threaded cartridge bearing bottom bracket by Phil Woods. One less thing to bother with.

Perhaps its the steeper head angle of that year, but its a little tight and has toe-overlap. Learning to be more aware of it in technical off-road and no way can I run full mudguards. For now trying some Bluemels shorties. They resonate and howl under braking though.

I have a tubular wheelset for it but for simplicity and carefree off-road riding, right now running a clincher with 32mm width Vittoria XN Pro's file tooth pattern. Its a fairly light clincher, yet I might switch back to tubulars and try some upper line cross rubber.

Don't really need special rando type bars. I flared these to ease some wrist pains, plus wrapped in a cork padded grip. Plugged one end and the other has a screw cap, just for a little rewarding libation cheer I do want a shorter stem. Fine for the road but when in the rough and descents, I feel there's too much forward weight transfer.

Sort of my own design for the bag mount. The small clips are spring loaded, partially suspend the bag and the bottom lightly rest on a small front support. The small clips on the bar are held by metal zip ties (as used on automotive CV joint boots). I covered the metal zip ties with tape before the bar wrap. Turned out well and no need for big decaleur plus wanted lots of room for hand / cold weather gloves. It all balances out nicely.

USB rechargeable Intertek / Ozark TL600PO tactical flashlight rocks. 615 lumens + Hi and low settings. Aluminum body, lightweight and definitly takes the rain and downpours. Service life is excellent. Homemade quick mount to the axle skewer. Used an old brake arm. Prefer steel.
Rear is an LED keychain aluminum housing flashlight from Ace Hardware. Homemade mount.
Total cost for the light group was $40.

I also have helmet lamps, use a hydration backback with tools, rubber spares and a blinky attached to it. Additionally, I occasionally use a flex solar charger that un-rolls and fits to the hydration pack. For camping its fine as its only a transfer / charger. I'm old school but really like the new lighting technology. Riding the woods in the middle of the night is a hoot. Slower going but it seems much faster. The sensation, seeing wildlife and a different sort of cycling challenge. I keep trying but no invite has yet gone with me. Ha.

Attached Images
File Type: jpg
72 LeChampion bar a.jpg (104.9 KB, 946 views)
File Type: jpg
IMG_8282sm.jpg (100.5 KB, 933 views)
File Type: jpg
IMG_8515sm.jpg (95.6 KB, 935 views)
File Type: jpg
IMG_9530sm.jpg (100.5 KB, 940 views)
File Type: jpg
IMG_9532sm.jpg (103.0 KB, 953 views)
File Type: jpg
IMG_9921sm.jpg (102.4 KB, 944 views)
crank_addict is offline  
Old 06-19-15, 04:31 PM
  #399  
working on my sandal tan
 
ThermionicScott's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: CID
Posts: 22,611

Bikes: 1991 Bianchi Eros, 1964 Armstrong, 1988 Diamondback Ascent, 1988 Bianchi Premio, 1987 Bianchi Sport SX, 1980s Raleigh mixte (hers), All-City Space Horse (hers)

Mentioned: 98 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3867 Post(s)
Liked 2,549 Times in 1,570 Posts
Originally Posted by bikemig
That is an awesome bike cuz you're riding it on PBP; some of the rest of us (that would include me) are just dreamers.That's a great bike and I love all the kludges. This is a bike that does the job,
Thanks Miguel!
__________________
Originally Posted by chandltp
There's no such thing as too far.. just lack of time
Originally Posted by noglider
People in this forum are not typical.
RUSA #7498
ThermionicScott is offline  
Old 07-17-15, 07:32 PM
  #400  
Bike Butcher of Portland
 
gugie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 11,596

Bikes: It's complicated.

Mentioned: 1294 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4643 Post(s)
Liked 5,634 Times in 2,238 Posts
Originally Posted by rhm
As for adventure, my idea is to get on my bike and go far enough that I don't know where I am.
Damn, that's a great tag line, and a wonderful way to live ones life. On a bike, of course.
__________________
If someone tells you that you have enough bicycles and you don't need any more, stop talking to them. You don't need that kind of negativity in your life.
gugie is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service -

Copyright © 2024 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.