Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Classic & Vintage
Reload this Page >

Show off that Randonneur; and let's discuss the bike, the gear, the sport

Notices
Classic & Vintage This forum is to discuss the many aspects of classic and vintage bicycles, including musclebikes, lightweights, middleweights, hi-wheelers, bone-shakers, safety bikes and much more.

Show off that Randonneur; and let's discuss the bike, the gear, the sport

Old 05-08-17, 07:15 AM
  #526  
gugie 
Bike Butcher of Portland
 
gugie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 11,411

Bikes: It's complicated.

Mentioned: 1273 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4542 Post(s)
Liked 5,324 Times in 2,132 Posts
Your Fitz is exactly perfect!
Originally Posted by catgita
I don't actually do randonneuring, but it was the perfect bike for my needs. My body proportions don't work for off the shelf geometry, so this one is full custom. I have always struggled to be comfortable on a bike for more than a few hours, now mostly solved. I commute daily on this bike as well as weekend rides of 3-6 hours.

I designed all the geometry and specifications, did engineering calculations to get some tuned flex and good weight distribution, and worked with the builder on tubing selection and details. It is based largely on mid century allroad bikes from Herse and Singer. It was in fabrication when Compass introduced the centerpulls and front rack. I have since changed to the Mais Parallel bar, which is far more comfortable for me. It has 30mm of trail, which gives it amazingly easy and confident handling, regardless of the front load or not.

I can't say it is the fastest I have ridden in terms of pure speed, but anything over 3 hours, I have far more energy and comfort in reserve, so average speeds are good.
https://flickr.com/photos/56845372@N...57683554637615
__________________
If someone tells you that you have enough bicycles and you don't need any more, stop talking to them. You don't need that kind of negativity in your life.
gugie is offline  
Old 05-10-17, 06:45 AM
  #527  
83cannondale
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Milwaukee
Posts: 173

Bikes: Trek Domane SL7 83 Cannondale, 70s Raleigh International, 70s Bob Jackson, 70s Gitane tandem, 2018 Trek Domane SL7, Giant Yukon MTB

Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 74 Post(s)
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Weather change -

Originally Posted by kingston
@gugie, You inspired me to put mud-flaps on my randonneuring bike. (I know its not C&V) I bought everything I need from the hardware store today.



@Sedgemop, @bear_a_bug & @83cannondale, The Evansville classic was the opening day 200 for many years. Ive ridden it many times. Ill be in Delavan next weekend, but Im riding the 300k. I hope it rains so I can take advantage of my new mud-flaps .
Kingston - hope to see you there! By the way, forecast went from 80% chance of rain, mid 40s, to 9% rain, highs in the low 70s. I guess I'll forgo my mudflap project for now. Introduce your self! I'll be riding black 83 cannondale with black fenders, brooks seat.
83cannondale is offline  
Old 05-10-17, 06:50 AM
  #528  
kingston 
Jedi Master
 
kingston's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Lake Forest, IL
Posts: 3,721

Bikes: https://stinkston.blogspot.com/p/my-bikes.html

Mentioned: 42 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1758 Post(s)
Liked 484 Times in 311 Posts
Originally Posted by 83cannondale
Kingston - hope to see you there! By the way, forecast went from 80% chance of rain, mid 40s, to 9% rain, highs in the low 70s. I guess I'll forgo my mudflap project for now. Introduce your self! I'll be riding black 83 cannondale with black fenders, brooks seat.
I saw the forecast change. Funny because the original forecast is what motivated me to make the mudflaps in the first place. Looks like it's going to be a beautiful day. I'm considering making a smaller set of "decorative" mudflaps with some of the leftover material. I'll be riding the bike in the picture. See you there.
kingston is offline  
Old 05-10-17, 06:55 AM
  #529  
romperrr 
Pedal to the medal
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: The Arsenal of Democracy
Posts: 1,253

Bikes: 1991 Team Miyata Track, 1992 Lemond Alpe d'Huez, 19?? Schwinn High Serra, 1982 Trek 614, 198X Raleigh Alyeska

Mentioned: 17 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 260 Post(s)
Liked 158 Times in 95 Posts
@catgita, that bike is top notch. What housing are you using? It doesn't bother you under the bar tape?
romperrr is offline  
Old 05-10-17, 07:45 AM
  #530  
kingston 
Jedi Master
 
kingston's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Lake Forest, IL
Posts: 3,721

Bikes: https://stinkston.blogspot.com/p/my-bikes.html

Mentioned: 42 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1758 Post(s)
Liked 484 Times in 311 Posts
Originally Posted by romperrr
@catgita, that bike is top notch. What housing are you using? It doesn't bother you under the bar tape?
Absolutely stunning. All it needs are some mud flaps . GB makes some nice ones that will match your saddle.
kingston is offline  
Old 05-18-18, 11:03 AM
  #531  
rhm
multimodal commuter
 
rhm's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: NJ, NYC, LI
Posts: 19,847

Bikes: 1940s Fothergill, 1959 Allegro Special, 1963? Claud Butler Olympic Sprint, Lambert 'Clubman', 1974 Fuji "the Ace", 1976 Holdsworth 650b conversion rando bike, 1983 Trek 720 tourer, 1984 Counterpoint Opus II, 1993 Basso Gap, 2010 Downtube 8h, and...

Mentioned: 572 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1903 Post(s)
Liked 548 Times in 326 Posts
Originally Posted by unterhausen
Since this thread was posted, I have been looking into this subject quite a bit. Actually, the week after this thread was posted, I rode my first 200k and I'm about to ride a 400k this weekend. So the OP has a lot to answer for.

The framebuilder email list got spammed with the subject of randonneur geometry recently, and that made me look into it again.

The thing about what is now called a randonneur is that it basically is a racing bike from some point in history, usually with a front rack added. So when you go to a brevet and see a batch of current racing bikes with seat bags on them, that is not any different than what you would have seen at a brevet back in the '50s or '40s. BQ is successfully promoting the interest in steel rando bikes, but only a minority of riders are buying into that idea so far. After 100 miles, the idea of losing 5 pounds off the bike seems to be fairly attractive to a lot of people.
I wanted to bump this thread anyway, and this post seems the best place to start. I have to admit I wasn't much aware of randonneuring when I first saw this thread, but took an interest in it after that point.

Who else?
__________________
www.rhmsaddles.com.
rhm is offline  
Old 05-18-18, 11:28 AM
  #532  
noglider 
aka Tom Reingold
 
noglider's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: New York, NY, USA
Posts: 40,329

Bikes: 1962 Rudge Sports, 1971 Raleigh Super Course, 1971 Raleigh Pro Track, 1974 Raleigh International, 1975 Viscount Fixie, 1982 McLean, 1996 Lemond (Ti), 2002 Burley Zydeco tandem

Mentioned: 502 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7093 Post(s)
Liked 2,006 Times in 1,191 Posts
I heard of it many years ago. A couple of years ago, I attended a meeting of New York Cycle Club, and the evening's event had speakers from one or both of the local randonneuring clubs. It was interesting, and I was especially heartened to hear that the average age of participants is 51 years. I'm interested but haven't dipped my toes in yet. I'm still building miles.
__________________
Tom Reingold, tom@noglider.com
New York City and High Falls, NY
Blogs: The Experienced Cyclist; noglider's ride blog

When man invented the bicycle he reached the peak of his attainments. Elizabeth West, US author

Please email me rather than PM'ing me. Thanks.
noglider is offline  
Old 05-18-18, 11:46 AM
  #533  
Salamandrine 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 6,287

Bikes: 78 Masi Criterium, 68 PX10, 2016 Mercian King of Mercia, Rivendell Clem Smith Jr

Mentioned: 120 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2317 Post(s)
Liked 592 Times in 427 Posts
I still am pretty fuzzy on the concept of Randonneuring as well. What is the point? Is it a race, a tour, a challenge, a recreational ride? How is it fun? It seems kind of like a century except with added paperwork and bureaucracy -- two things that I try to avoid if possible. When did they start in the US?

I grew up with the (American?) concept of the Century as being the big challenge ride. My first one was sort of a challenge I guess. When I got into the racing crowd a little later, the distance was no big deal. We'd only show up at club centuries in order to eat as much food as possible at the rest stops. That made them worthwhile.
Salamandrine is offline  
Old 05-18-18, 01:05 PM
  #534  
rhm
multimodal commuter
 
rhm's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: NJ, NYC, LI
Posts: 19,847

Bikes: 1940s Fothergill, 1959 Allegro Special, 1963? Claud Butler Olympic Sprint, Lambert 'Clubman', 1974 Fuji "the Ace", 1976 Holdsworth 650b conversion rando bike, 1983 Trek 720 tourer, 1984 Counterpoint Opus II, 1993 Basso Gap, 2010 Downtube 8h, and...

Mentioned: 572 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1903 Post(s)
Liked 548 Times in 326 Posts
Originally Posted by Salamandrine
I still am pretty fuzzy on the concept of Randonneuring as well. What is the point? Is it a race, a tour, a challenge, a recreational ride? How is it fun? It seems kind of like a century except with added paperwork and bureaucracy -- two things that I try to avoid if possible. When did they start in the US?

I grew up with the (American?) concept of the Century as being the big challenge ride. My first one was sort of a challenge I guess. When I got into the racing crowd a little later, the distance was no big deal. We'd only show up at club centuries in order to eat as much food as possible at the rest stops. That made them worthwhile.
What's the point? I have no idea. Do sports have a point?

Is it a race? No... uh... what's a race, anyway? There is no winner (but everyone is timed; and there is a first finisher).

Is it a tour? No... uh... what's a tour, anyway? I think touring is about exploring, relaxing, going where the wind blows you. Touring has no rules. Randonneuring has rules.

Is it a challenge? Yes, definitely.

Is it a recreational ride? Yes, definitely; but not just one. It's a habit of recreational rides.

How is it fun? I have no idea... or at least, I can't explain it in a convincing way... but it is. And it's addictive.

I, too, dislike the paperwork &c. The thing is, Randonneuring is a sport, and it has rules. You don't have to like the rules to participate; but they establish a certain baseline or standard that all the participants subscribe to, and this ensures a kind of camaraderie that you don't get in touring. I'm sure there is a similar camaraderie in racing, but I can't elaborate on that.

When did they start in the USA? 1998.

Okay, so much for easy, flippant answers...

Historically, I think Randonneuring is tied to a desire to demonstrate the potential of the bicycle as a reliable and efficient mode of long distance transportation. Early car races had that goal as well. But that's just the origin story, and the sport has left that connection behind long ago. I must admit, though, my own interest in the sport came from that direction as well.

Comparing randonneuring to touring, I would rather go for a tour than a randonnee; but I rarely find the time. Touring and randonneuring both have their challenges, and choosing the latter over the former you simply substitute one set of challenges for the other.

Consider the planning, for example; you can go for a tour anywhere, but you have to figure out the route and logistics and what not, and you're going out and doing it by yourself... and so on. Similarly, you can sign up for a randonnee almost anywhere, and all you have to do is get yourself and your bike to the start and get home again. You're guaranteed a route that someone has tested, you're guaranteed a workable cue sheet, and you're given a clear idea of facilities along the way. If you do the ride, you will ride with people, some of whom you may know from previous rides.

Whatever hardships you encounter on a randonnee, you can be pretty sure the other riders encountered the same thing. Most randonnees have a finish rate of 100% or near that; but occasionally no one finishes. There was a ride in PA in January of 2017, 200k, and a couple riders went out and checked out the whole course, on bikes, a week before the event. Nice weather. On the day of the event, it snowed, and no one finished. So statistically, the two pre-riders finished, and no one else did. The pre-riders, by the way, typically volunteer to help out on the day of the event; in this case, one of the volunteers got in his pickup truck and drove the course, picking up riders as he went.

It's not for everyone.

I'm signed up for a 1200 randonnee that goes counterclockwise around about half of Lake Michigan at the end of August. Over the course of four days I'll ride farther than I did on an eight day tour of upstate NY a few years ago. It will probably be less fun, and not much cheaper, and as for the scenery, well, much of it will be dark. It's hard to explain this in a way that makes sense, but I'm looking forward to it.
__________________
www.rhmsaddles.com.

Last edited by rhm; 05-18-18 at 01:14 PM.
rhm is offline  
Old 05-18-18, 01:41 PM
  #535  
Salamandrine 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 6,287

Bikes: 78 Masi Criterium, 68 PX10, 2016 Mercian King of Mercia, Rivendell Clem Smith Jr

Mentioned: 120 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2317 Post(s)
Liked 592 Times in 427 Posts
Originally Posted by rhm
What's the point? I have no idea. Do sports have a point?
Good point.

Thank you though. I appreciate the thorough explanation to my somewhat vague inquiry. I guess I was looking for someone to explain why they do these things. Sounds like I'll simply have to try it for myself sometime.

The predetermined and known route aspect is appealing. Hadn't thought of that. Might be nice to ride a couple just to learn some good routes. I didn't grow up in socal, and don't know 'all' the rides like I do in norcal.
Salamandrine is offline  
Old 05-18-18, 02:29 PM
  #536  
gomango
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: STP
Posts: 15,221
Mentioned: 73 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 819 Post(s)
Liked 247 Times in 139 Posts
Back to fotos.

Check out this brand new MAP.

Saving my pennies for one of these.

Maybe the prettiest frameset I have ever seen.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/mapcyc...390165/in/feed

https://www.flickr.com/photos/mapcyc...n/photostream/

https://www.flickr.com/photos/mapcyc...n/photostream/
gomango is offline  
Old 05-18-18, 03:20 PM
  #537  
JaccoW
Overdoing projects
 
JaccoW's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Rotterdam, former republic of the Netherlands
Posts: 2,356

Bikes: Batavus Randonneur GL, Gazelle Orange Excellent, Gazelle Super Licht, Gazelle Grand Tourist, Gazelle Lausanne, Gazelle Tandem, Koga-Miyata SilverAce, Koga-Miyata WorldTraveller

Mentioned: 55 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 757 Post(s)
Liked 1,086 Times in 624 Posts
Not a randonneur myself but I do plan to use my Batavus Randonneur GL for light long distance touring once it is done.



Build log here.
JaccoW is offline  
Old 05-18-18, 10:09 PM
  #538  
ThermionicScott 
working on my sandal tan
 
ThermionicScott's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: CID
Posts: 22,560

Bikes: 1991 Bianchi Eros, 1964 Armstrong, 1988 Diamondback Ascent, 1988 Bianchi Premio, 1987 Bianchi Sport SX, 1980s Raleigh mixte (hers), All-City Space Horse (hers)

Mentioned: 98 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3850 Post(s)
Liked 2,507 Times in 1,545 Posts
Originally Posted by Salamandrine
I guess I was looking for someone to explain why they do these things.
I can't think of a good reason; I just do 'em.
__________________
Originally Posted by chandltp
There's no such thing as too far.. just lack of time
Originally Posted by noglider
People in this forum are not typical.
RUSA #7498
ThermionicScott is offline  
Old 11-14-18, 11:07 AM
  #539  
Scottybigs
Full Member
 
Scottybigs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Location: Toronto
Posts: 269

Bikes: Schwinn Voyageur SP | Sekine SHS-271 | Wabi Special

Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 114 Post(s)
Liked 6 Times in 3 Posts
Keeping this thread alive. I road an almost-century (145 km...really should have done donuts in the parking lot or something) last week, and feel like my Schwinn Voyageur SP is in that near-perfect build phase for getting up to the 200km brevet level.

It's at 26lbs now (without the bag), which is getting into a great weight for a fully equipped bike. I've got a pair of 700c Pacenti Brevets waiting to be laced to 105 hubs, which will drop almost 1 lb off the wheels since the A319's are boat anchors, as are the vintage hubs and freewheel.

I do wish that the frame was made of Reynolds 725 or Kaisei tubing, not because of the weight savings per se, but because of the flex and performance. Tange 2 is great, but my 725 Wabi frame is noticeable stiffer and more responsive.

One thing I've been mulling over is geometry. The Schwinn has 44cm chainstays to account for rear panniers, and 72/72 frame angles. Does anyone ride brevets with mid-range chainstays (42cm) and 73/73 angles? How does it feel?

Scottybigs is offline  
Old 11-14-18, 11:58 AM
  #540  
clasher
Senior Member
 
clasher's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Kitchener, ON
Posts: 2,735
Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 229 Post(s)
Liked 147 Times in 102 Posts
Sweet looking ride @Scottybigs maybe I'll see you at a randonneurs ontario ride next season! I've seen a growing number of vintage conversions on brevets the last couple of years... unfortunately for my miyata 1000, I usually ride my carbon road bike for brevets now.
clasher is offline  
Old 11-14-18, 12:55 PM
  #541  
non-fixie 
Shifting is fun!
 
non-fixie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: South Holland, NL
Posts: 10,708

Bikes: Yes, please.

Mentioned: 268 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2077 Post(s)
Liked 3,899 Times in 1,539 Posts
Originally Posted by Scottybigs
(....) One thing I've been mulling over is geometry. The Schwinn has 44cm chainstays to account for rear panniers, and 72/72 frame angles. Does anyone ride brevets with mid-range chainstays (42cm) and 73/73 angles? How does it feel?
I haven't ridden any brevets (yet), but I have been mulling over the same question. Mrs non-fixie and I like to take out our bikes and go credit card touring once or twice a year. Typically for a little over a week, with 50-100 km/day, in hilly areas like the Provence or Tuscany with just a saddle bag. Over the years I've acquired and built a few bikes specifically for that purpose.

This is a Gazelle Champion Mondial semi-race. Hand-built by Gazelle's racing department for touring purposes. My assessment so far: very nice bike, but a bit truck-like compared to the racing version. I'm blaming the long wheelbase.



This is a Roy Thame (the former Holdsworth team manager) touring bike, and (probably) built by Tommy Quick. Another very nice bike, but clearly intended to for more luggage than I take along.



This is a frankenbike based on an early eighties Miki-built racing frame that had just enough room for 28mm tires and fenders. It has a shorter wheelbase than the previous two and feels a lot more responsive, while still feeling stable on fast descents.



For the rides we do I like the latter one best. I think the more racy geometry is the main factor.

FWIW.
__________________
Nananananananananana ...
non-fixie is offline  
Old 11-14-18, 01:02 PM
  #542  
justinsdrake
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2017
Location: Nor Cal
Posts: 14

Bikes: 85 Schwinn Cimarron, Soma San Marcos, Yuba Mundo e-cargo bike, ratty old hard tail 29er and I stare at my wife's 87 Sequoia that she does not ride

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 11 Post(s)
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rando conversion

What are your thoughts on converting an early 80s MTB to rando with new wheels and those supple rat trap pass tires?
justinsdrake is offline  
Old 11-14-18, 01:36 PM
  #543  
kingston 
Jedi Master
 
kingston's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Lake Forest, IL
Posts: 3,721

Bikes: https://stinkston.blogspot.com/p/my-bikes.html

Mentioned: 42 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1758 Post(s)
Liked 484 Times in 311 Posts
Originally Posted by justinsdrake
What are your thoughts on converting an early 80s MTB to rando with new wheels and those supple rat trap pass tires?
While I'm sure you could make it work, 26" wheels would not be my first choice for randonneuring, and 2.3" tires are massive overkill for any brevet I've ever ridden.
kingston is offline  
Old 11-14-18, 01:48 PM
  #544  
unterhausen
Randomhead
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Happy Valley, Pennsylvania
Posts: 23,855
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Liked 3,243 Times in 2,237 Posts
I think this thread got me started randonneuring, thanks a lot

You could ride a mtb on brevets. Having said that, I always have trouble with getting numb hands on a bike like that, and I know others say the same. I have a couple of vaguely numb fingers from a 1200k I rode at the end of August, so it can take a while to recover. This is about the longest it has taken.

I caught a number of mtb riders on PBP. None of them seemed to be having much fun, although that could be said for most people that I caught
unterhausen is offline  
Old 11-14-18, 02:55 PM
  #545  
justinsdrake
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2017
Location: Nor Cal
Posts: 14

Bikes: 85 Schwinn Cimarron, Soma San Marcos, Yuba Mundo e-cargo bike, ratty old hard tail 29er and I stare at my wife's 87 Sequoia that she does not ride

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 11 Post(s)
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by kingston
While I'm sure you could make it work, 26" wheels would not be my first choice for randonneuring, and 2.3" tires are massive overkill for any brevet I've ever ridden.
I through it was going to be kinda sluggish for such long riding but was going to convert to drop bars. I just really wanted wider tires AND fenders.

I've got a Soma San Marcos with 700c tires that can take about 30 mm with fenders as my other option. I was thinking of using the Compass 32 mm Stampede pass, but those are not tubeless and I dont think will give me the same cushy feeling as the the 35 mm Bon Jon Pass, which are tubeless. Those are likely too big to fit under my fenders without a fender mod like the reach around.

After thinking this through, the San Marcos is probably a better option. Should I use 32 mm tires from compass and keep my fenders or use the 35 mm tubeless and hack up my fenders. Leaning toward the 35 mm as I dont ride in the rain that often so hacking up the fenders dose not seem like it will affect me that many times.
justinsdrake is offline  
Old 11-14-18, 03:04 PM
  #546  
non-fixie 
Shifting is fun!
 
non-fixie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: South Holland, NL
Posts: 10,708

Bikes: Yes, please.

Mentioned: 268 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2077 Post(s)
Liked 3,899 Times in 1,539 Posts
Originally Posted by justinsdrake
What are your thoughts on converting an early 80s MTB to rando with new wheels and those supple rat trap pass tires?
If you're limited to a very small frame size, then it may be a useful workaround, but they tend to have high BB's, giving you a high center of gravity and issues when stopping, such as at trafiic lights. Also, bigger wheels roll better over rough roads.
So, my advice would be to get the biggest wheels you can fit, and on a road frame. Me, I would love 30" wheels.
__________________
Nananananananananana ...
non-fixie is offline  
Old 11-14-18, 04:04 PM
  #547  
kingston 
Jedi Master
 
kingston's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Lake Forest, IL
Posts: 3,721

Bikes: https://stinkston.blogspot.com/p/my-bikes.html

Mentioned: 42 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1758 Post(s)
Liked 484 Times in 311 Posts
Originally Posted by justinsdrake
Should I use 32 mm tires from compass and keep my fenders or use the 35 mm tubeless and hack up my fenders?
You should use whatever makes you happy. I like having fenders when it rains, think that 32mm is wide enough for 99% of brevet surfaces, and don't see the point of tubeless tires for road bikes.
kingston is offline  
Old 11-14-18, 04:49 PM
  #548  
tyrion
Senior Member
 
tyrion's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: San Diego, California
Posts: 4,077

Bikes: Velo Orange Piolet

Mentioned: 28 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2227 Post(s)
Liked 2,006 Times in 971 Posts
Originally Posted by justinsdrake
What are your thoughts on converting an early 80s MTB to rando with new wheels and those supple rat trap pass tires?
I think this woman has Rat Trap Passes on her rando bike:

tyrion is offline  
Old 11-14-18, 06:12 PM
  #549  
rhm
multimodal commuter
 
rhm's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: NJ, NYC, LI
Posts: 19,847

Bikes: 1940s Fothergill, 1959 Allegro Special, 1963? Claud Butler Olympic Sprint, Lambert 'Clubman', 1974 Fuji "the Ace", 1976 Holdsworth 650b conversion rando bike, 1983 Trek 720 tourer, 1984 Counterpoint Opus II, 1993 Basso Gap, 2010 Downtube 8h, and...

Mentioned: 572 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1903 Post(s)
Liked 548 Times in 326 Posts
Originally Posted by kingston
You should use whatever makes you happy. I like having fenders when it rains, think that 32mm is wide enough for 99% of brevet surfaces, and don't see the point of tubeless tires for road bikes.
I agree with all of the above, but not quite entirely.

Yes, absolutely, use whatever makes you happy. Rat Trap Pass tires definitely make me happy, but evidently that's not for everyone. Nonetheless, in the last year I've ridden my Rat Trap Pass equipped bike on a complete SR series, two flches, a 1200 km grand brevet, and assorted other rides.

I like having fenders, too. I like them when it rains, I like them if it might rain, and I like them if it rained recently. I like them the rest of the time, too.

If 32mm is enough for 99% of brevet riding, then perhaps it is not enough for the remaining 1%. That remaining 1% may suck. No big deal. But more to the point, I think, is that as long as most riders are on skinny tires, most brevets will have to be designed to accommodate them. This means busier roads. I did a grand brevet at the end of August that was entirely on roads deemed acceptable to people on skinny tires, which included some roads that were downright dangerous. Some unpaved roads had been considered but rejected on the pre-ride. I cannot second guess that decision, of course. But one way or another, fatter tires open up possibilities that are not available to those on skinny tires.

Perhaps the more important point, regarding fatter tires such as the Rat Trap Pass is that there is no downside. They are just as fast on pavement as skinny tires (and dramatically faster on dirt or gravel). They are no more susceptible to puncture than other tires (and less susceptible to pinch flats). Wheels hold up better, and the rider is more comfortable. I see only advantages.

Okay, to be completely fair, there is the downside that few randonneuring bikes have been designed for fat 26" tires, so you may have to go custom*, and there is the additional downside that a 53 mm tire makes a big splash going through puddles, a splash that inevitably hits your feet. I kinda hate that.

*Old MTB's are a possiblity, but the high bottom bracket and slack geometry are an issue. Also, these frames are built heavy and tough, which is not great for randonneuring. If I were building up a bike for these tires now, I would look at getting an off the shelf frame made for either 650b or 26" wheels with disk brakes (I'm thinking of the Crust Romanceur, I think), and I'd have a custom fork made to fit it with 26" rims and cantilever brakes.

Tubeless tires don't make sense randonneuring. You can't carry a compressor with you, but a tiny little hand pump and a patch kit are no problem.

All that said, @JustinDrake, if you're new to randonneuring I would not worry about the bike yet. Almost any bike will do, and though you can expect it will have shortcomings, its shortcomings may not be what you expected. On a 200 km ride, that's okay. You will quickly start learning its shortcomings, and forming a better idea of what you need to make randonneuring easy and fun. I have found the classic randonneuring bag, the big box in front of the handlebar, to be a great help. It holds everything you need, most of it available even when riding. I've also taken to using a hydration pack slung under the top tube, which holds enough water for many hours of riding and I can drink while riding.

Other aspects of equipment are so oobvious that I think we tend to overlook them. Finding the right saddle is probably more important than finding the right frame. When you have found a saddle and shifters and brakes levers and pedals and shoes that don't cause you any pain after ten or fifteen hours, you'll be well on your way. Until then, I wouldn't worry about the frame and wheels too much, as long as the bike fits you and is in decent condition.

Last edited by rhm; 11-14-18 at 07:25 PM.
rhm is offline  
Old 11-15-18, 10:19 AM
  #550  
Feldman
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Posts: 1,169
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 116 Post(s)
Liked 66 Times in 48 Posts
Originally Posted by redxj
I have been spending lots of time searching Rando/Audax/Brevet info just reading and looking at pictures. I will be doing a sort of randonneur build of a different sort, 3 speed fixed. I was looking for a suitable vintage touring bike w/lots of braze ons, canti mounts, rack mounts, and room for bigger tires and fenders. My problem is so many have short top tubes for my size. But, then I ended up buying a brand new Surly Long Haul Trucker for my geared commuting and full on touring bike if I so choose. So that opened up my previous commuter bike, 83 Nishiki Seral to be the fixed Rando build, perfect! It already has a Generator front hub, but I bought another one and will lace that one up to a CR-18 and the Sturmey Archer S3X 3 speed fixed hub will get another CR18 rim. The build will be something single chainring square taper crankset, fenders, 700c x 32 tires, canti brakes, Nitto M12 front rack, generator front hub, S3X rear, generator light mounted under the top of the Nitto rack, big French style Handlebar bag (like Berthoud, but cheaper), bigger seat bag (my Acorn), and maybe a smaller rear rack. The entire drive train on it now will be changing. The tires, tubes, fenders, stem, bars, seat, seatpost, canti brakes, frame,fork, and headset will stay.

Anyone want to wast lots of time looking at Randonneur bikes/ride pics go here Randonneur | Flickr

And a few real Rando bikes, both from Coho cycles:



An example of a bike that will right controllably and pleasantly with that big front bag--the bag's weight is centered over, maybe even a little behind, the front axle.

Last edited by Feldman; 11-15-18 at 10:21 AM. Reason: Syntax correction
Feldman is offline  
Likes For Feldman:

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell or Share My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2023 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.