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eBay / CraigsList finds - "Are you looking for one of these!?" Part II

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eBay / CraigsList finds - "Are you looking for one of these!?" Part II

Old 12-05-16, 06:00 AM
  #38026  
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It's funny about quill stems, I have both type of stems and personally I prefer the quill stem over the threadless, they're far easier to adjust without the need for spacers or removing spacers to adjust the height, nor the need to preload, they look nicer. The only disadvantage to a quill is that you can't replace or remove the handlebar as easily as you can with a threadless design, however newer quill stems have actually incorporated the newer faceplate design that makes removing a handlebar the same simplicity as a threadless design.

Some people argue that a threadless design is more rigid connection then a threaded, but I've (edit) NOT noticed this with my bikes. Also threadless design offers NO room for error is you or the mechanic cuts your fork wrong, whereas a threaded design has room for error. Another issue, howbeit rare and would only happen due to severe neglect, is that the threaded design could seize inside the headtube causing all sorts of issues.

For me the two issues I don't like about threadless is that they are extremely ugly primarily; and two, they are a bit harder to adjust; other than those two reasons I really don't see any other issues between the two for me preferring one over the other. There is just something graceful about the appearance of a quill stem that the threadless design completely lacks, but it is what it is, we have to accept what we get today if you want to ride a modern bike.

Last edited by rekmeyata; 12-05-16 at 11:31 AM.
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Old 12-05-16, 08:47 AM
  #38027  
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nothing looks nicer than a quill stem...
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Old 12-05-16, 09:09 AM
  #38028  
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Originally Posted by rekmeyata
It's funny about quill stems, I have both type of stems and personally I prefer the quill stem over the threadless, they're far easier to adjust without the need for spacers or removing spacers to adjust the height, nor the need to preload, they look nicer. The only disadvantage to a quill is that you can't replace or remove the handlebar as easily as you can with a threadless design, however newer quill stems have actually incorporated the newer faceplate design that makes removing a handlebar the same simplicity as a threadless design.

Some people argue that a threadless design is more rigid connection then a threaded, but I've noticed this with my bikes. Also threadless design offers NO room for error is you or the mechanic cuts your fork wrong, whereas a threaded design has room for error. Another issue, howbeit rare and would only happen due to severe neglect, is that the threaded design could seize inside the headtube causing all sorts of issues.

For me the two issues I don't like about threadless is that they are extremely ugly primarily; and two, they are a bit harder to adjust; other than those two reasons I really don't see any other issues between the two for me preferring one over the other. There is just something graceful about the appearance of a quill stem that the threadless design completely lacks, but it is what it is, we have to accept what we get today if you want to ride a modern bike.
You make several good points here, @rekmeyata. I've used the sort of "capped" style quill you mention and it is quite handy, although not as graceful as the standard quill design. Besides, I think the capped stem is really designed for drop bars or any bar that you wrap with tape. Since I use lock-on grips almost exclusively, the older design doesn't bother me too much.

Then there is the look, and the economics. I simply prefer C&V style because I grew up with them, and since I am not a racer anymore I don't have to chase after evolving performance technology while shuffling credit cards like a poker hand.

Besides, when ridden infrequently as part of a collection, these old bikes never seem to wear out . What I appreciate most about C&V, and really cycling in general, is the amount of craftsmanship that is lavished on these simple machines. Of course, I'm not talking about dept. store BSOs, but even the second-tier bikes from quality manufacturers are quite impressive in their attention-to-detail and the care that so obviously went into their design and manufacture.

This hobby is so rich and deep in its variety that I'm either going to have to focus on one particular specialty, or build another shed... N+1=
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Old 12-05-16, 09:15 AM
  #38029  
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Originally Posted by CuttersRidge




Antique Indonesian pedicab (becak)(price update)
Authentic, vintage Indonesian Pedicab (Becak). Everything is original and in working order. You will probably not find another one of these in the United States!
---

More pictures at link, only $100, and steering? Still, interesting. Looks to me like the handlebars or something are needed.
The handlebar is there - blue tube with a chrome bell on it. Could use some bar tape.
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Old 12-05-16, 09:22 AM
  #38030  
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Originally Posted by LesterOfPuppets
The handlebar is there - blue tube with a chrome bell on it. Could use some bar tape.
Don't these turn by differential braking? I vaguely remember a drunken evening on liberty in Thailand where we paid the "driver" to borrow his rig to race against Marines from a sister squadron. Seems to me steering was a rather dodgy affair, since that handlebar didn't turn, but there were rim brakes on each front wheel .
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Old 12-05-16, 09:22 AM
  #38031  
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Originally Posted by CuttersRidge
This is what balloon tire must mean.

1941 Monark silver king

Wow, those balloon tires really work. He's got hooks to keep the bike from floating away!
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Old 12-05-16, 09:24 AM
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Originally Posted by DQRider
Don't these turn by differential braking? I vaguely remember a drunken evening on liberty in Thailand where we paid the "driver" to borrow his rig to race against Marines from a sister squadron. Seems to me steering was a rather dodgy affair, since that handlebar didn't turn, but there were rim brakes on each front wheel .
I think the front end steers on this one. It looks to be turning right in the pics

[IMG][/IMG]
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Old 12-05-16, 09:28 AM
  #38033  
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Originally Posted by DQRider
Don't these turn by differential braking? I vaguely remember a drunken evening on liberty in Thailand where we paid the "driver" to borrow his rig to race against Marines from a sister squadron. Seems to me steering was a rather dodgy affair, since that handlebar didn't turn, but there were rim brakes on each front wheel .
Ha ha it seems like every sailor's memory of Thailand is always a little "hazy".
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Old 12-05-16, 09:30 AM
  #38034  
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Originally Posted by Ironfish653
Cannondale Black Lightning
1988 Cannondale Black Lightning Criterium
Looks to be pretty clean for a 30 year old bike. Almost too clean to ride.

That one is outside my travel range but should set off some salivation amongst the C'Dale lovers around here. I think that one might be considered a grail bike for some.
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Old 12-05-16, 09:39 AM
  #38035  
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Originally Posted by Spaghetti Legs
Ha ha it seems like every sailor's memory of Thailand is always a little "hazy".
Er, ahem*

I'm a Marine, not a sailor. Otherwise yes, you are correct sir.
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Old 12-05-16, 09:53 AM
  #38036  
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Difference between a sailor and a marine? Marines swim!!!

I joke..i kid...wait-- eerrk###
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Old 12-05-16, 10:59 AM
  #38037  
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Originally Posted by LesterOfPuppets
The handlebar is there - blue tube with a chrome bell on it. Could use some bar tape.
Thank you. It dawned on me later on that that might be the case, namely because it appears to have a bell on the bar.

----------

I knew a lady in Albuquerque who was going to get into the pedicab business; she was a bartender. They have a little Old Town in Albuquerque but one of those pedicabs probably would work in a number of real touristy areas, in some place like Boulder, if permitted, Colorado Springs. Gee, that thing could even work in nicer weather in the Asian shop area of Minneapolis... again, if permitted. It is off that Lake street area. So, if one is an entrepeneur, maybe. Twins games, etc.

That "becak" as the ad calls them, really must be worth a good bit more than what they are asking but it must be a bit of a pain to move around.

So, maybe technically, it's different than a pedicab. It looks cool. Some other examples off of a search.



This next image must be a toy miniature:

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Old 12-05-16, 11:04 AM
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PEDI-CAB Bicycle



too bad the spokes weren't stainless like the rest of the cab!

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Old 12-05-16, 11:32 AM
  #38039  
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That Norco in Auburn has been posted by a few people here now, it is just not moving, it's down to $125 asking

70's vintage Norco road bike--all original, excellent
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Old 12-05-16, 11:53 AM
  #38040  
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Originally Posted by LesterOfPuppets
The handlebar is there - blue tube with a chrome bell on it. Could use some bar tape.

Man if that were in Chicago I would buy it. Looks like a ton of fun. Wife won't really ride with me, but I could put her and the 2 yr old in that and take them out for a ride every Sunday...go to breakfast somewhere, get a nice 5-10 mile ride in.

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Old 12-05-16, 11:54 AM
  #38041  
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Originally Posted by DQRider
You make several good points here, @rekmeyata. I've used the sort of "capped" style quill you mention and it is quite handy, although not as graceful as the standard quill design. Besides, I think the capped stem is really designed for drop bars or any bar that you wrap with tape. Since I use lock-on grips almost exclusively, the older design doesn't bother me too much.

Then there is the look, and the economics. I simply prefer C&V style because I grew up with them, and since I am not a racer anymore I don't have to chase after evolving performance technology while shuffling credit cards like a poker hand.

Besides, when ridden infrequently as part of a collection, these old bikes never seem to wear out . What I appreciate most about C&V, and really cycling in general, is the amount of craftsmanship that is lavished on these simple machines. Of course, I'm not talking about dept. store BSOs, but even the second-tier bikes from quality manufacturers are quite impressive in their attention-to-detail and the care that so obviously went into their design and manufacture.

This hobby is so rich and deep in its variety that I'm either going to have to focus on one particular specialty, or build another shed... N+1=
Like you I grew up on that stuff too, but I don't prefer something because I grew up with something, the reason i like a lot of the older bikes is the handbuilt artistry (this is true with cars) that is completely lacking in today's bicycles.

The weird thing about today's world is that it's so industrial looking, lacking any form of artistry. There are things in that use to be produced that would just amaze you with the amount of time and pride it took to make, for example take a look a simple thing in life like a modern cash register: https://slm-assets2.secondlife.com/a...jpg?1367114174 But here's the same thing made in the early 1900's: Vintage cash register in Kilby General Store Museum, Harrison Mills, Canada Photo Canvas Print | Great Big Canvas

I took my daughter to the Auburn Museum here in Auburn In where they use to make Auburn cars, in the museum they had many Auburns and other cars as well, we walked around for 3 hours amazed at what they use to make, when I stepped outside I went to the parking lot I was shocked by how terrible our modern cars look. Here is an Auburn sports car: https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com...179b3dc718.jpg Here's what we find today: https://roa.h-cdn.co/assets/15/43/980...8954-c5z06.jpg Auburn sedan with hidden headlights and safety bumper(?, yup): https://topclassiccarsforsale.com/upl...er-sedan-1.jpg Here's what we get today: https://sdhondadealers.com/media/inv...GA026766-2.jpg

This sort of artistry comparing to yesteryear vs today is endless, building use to have stamped tin ceilings not just some sort of spray they use to paint all the tubing used for heating and ventilation, wires etc which you can still see, or they use a fiber board for a ceiling, simply ugly they way they do stuff today. Some car manufactures are starting to come out with some effort at creating an artistic looking car but we are still a long way away. I use to live in an house built in the early 1900's, these older houses had fantastic wood detail work done inside and out that isn't found today unless you spend a huge amount of money to have it done, but modern houses are simply plain with no artistry involved whatsoever, just cookie cutter houses that are slammed banged up.

Obviously just an opinion...I think I was born too late, but I do prefer the mid 80's era of bikes.
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Old 12-05-16, 12:11 PM
  #38042  
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Originally Posted by rekmeyata
Like you I grew up on that stuff too, but I don't prefer something because I grew up with something, the reason i like a lot of the older bikes is the handbuilt artistry (this is true with cars) that is completely lacking in today's bicycles........


I hear ya, brother. Can I get a A-MEN!?
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Old 12-05-16, 12:45 PM
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1. Bicycles have ALWAYS been products.
2. Very few bikes have ever been "artisan" creations.
3. New bikes aren't inherently any uglier, or inferior...merely different. Many of them far outstrip vintage bikes as purpose built machines for many users.

It's fine to prefer a particular style, or a type of ride...but there's no inherent truth, or beauty, to that preference. You also don't have to run down stuff to justify your preference. Most of the bikes posted here are mass produced products with no "artisan" or "hand made" quality to them...it's just an older manufacturing technique/material.
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Old 12-05-16, 01:17 PM
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Originally Posted by rccardr
Wow. Been looking for a Voyageur frame in that size to be redone in 700/650B configuration with reset canti mounts.

Anybody in Minneapoilis willing to give me a hand on this one?
Sure. PM me if you are still interested in it.
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Old 12-05-16, 01:27 PM
  #38045  
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Let's not argue opinions or preferences here - that never ends well.

We all respect the craftsmanship of C&V bicycles, or we wouldn't be here in this forum. But I am encouraged by the passion I see in this current bunch of bike builders; be they at Rivendell or Detroit Bikes or wherever a bunch of enthusiasts get together to hand build a frame, and then hand-pick the components that will go on it. I think most everyone can get behind that.

As technology advances, we see ornate lugwork fade in favor of lighter weight fillet brazing in the steel frames, and of course all the other materials that drive ever higher performance. To carry on with the automotive analogy, we have lost our tail fins and carburetors in favor of functional aerodynamics and digital efficiency.

It sure is a good thing we can still buy whatever we want (and can afford) - or if it doesn't exist yet, build it ourselves. We may not always have this luxury...
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Old 12-05-16, 05:06 PM
  #38046  
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https://boston.craigslist.org/gbs/bik/5900221955.html

58cm Heron Road frameset-built by Waterford (rhode island)









SO 32.25"
horizontal dropouts

Roly Poly 700x27mm tires pictured for clearance purposes

i never really noticed the top tube blem much in the 5 years i've owned the frame

Frame/fork/headset/binder bolt $600 shipped/insured. $550 picked up

i have more pictures

we can talk about additional parts
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Old 12-05-16, 05:13 PM
  #38047  
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https://boston.craigslist.org/nos/bik/5905685208.html

BIANCHI CAMPIONE D'ITALIA 12 SPD - $250








condition: good
make / manufacturer: BIANCHI
model name / number: CAMPIONE D'ITALIA
23 inch seat tube-just serviced-lite-fast-selling cheap-going up in spring-$250
do NOT contact me with unsolicited services or offers
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Old 12-05-16, 05:59 PM
  #38048  
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Drool. Too small for me.

small Centurion Cinelli Equipe



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Old 12-05-16, 06:34 PM
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Stablinski bicycle $90

Don't know a thing about them, and from the photos can't tell if it's gaspipe or quality. Nice looking lugs though, and it's at least a very uncommon brand. Jean Stablinski was apparently a French pro racer from 1958 to 1967, but I cannot find any info online about Stablinski as a brand. The one other I did find online had a Sachs-Huret drivetrain.


https://portland.craigslist.org/wsc/bik/5903830745.html
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Old 12-05-16, 06:53 PM
  #38050  
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Originally Posted by attylah
Don't know a thing about them, and from the photos can't tell if it's gaspipe or quality. Nice looking lugs though, and it's at least a very uncommon brand. Jean Stablinski was apparently a French pro racer from 1958 to 1967, but I cannot find any info online about Stablinski as a brand. The one other I did find online had a Sachs-Huret drivetrain.


https://portland.craigslist.org/wsc/bik/5903830745.html
Looks like a pretty basic bike-boom bike; probably a hi-ten steel frame with basic components. Note the generator bracket on the seat stay, indicating that the same frame would have been used on less sporty cycles (meaning those with upright bars and fenders). Does have the groovy wingnuts on the axles, though.

Last edited by thumpism; 12-05-16 at 06:57 PM.
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