Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Classic & Vintage
Reload this Page >

Classic Vintage Preferences and Some Rambling Observations

Notices
Classic & Vintage This forum is to discuss the many aspects of classic and vintage bicycles, including musclebikes, lightweights, middleweights, hi-wheelers, bone-shakers, safety bikes and much more.

Classic Vintage Preferences and Some Rambling Observations

Old 08-25-09, 12:28 PM
  #1  
yuyax
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Northern Virginia
Posts: 309
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Classic Vintage Preferences and Some Rambling Observations

I noticed that there are is a wide variety of vintage bikes and classics along with tastes, preferences and obsessions.

Growing up, my dream was to have that Italian or that bike with Columbus or Reynolds 531 tubing and full Campy. My first racing syle bike (I was maybe 14 at the time) was a low level Benotto with stem shifters and lighter gauge gas pipe tubing. I worked so hard to replace most of the parts. Downtube shifters, quick release hubs with narrower, alloy rims, narrower tires, etc. Somehow sold it and got a Legnano frame with the top/down seat tube wedge bolt with a combination of odds parts and ends. Old Shimano Dura Ace Crane, black Shimano chainrings, Sunshine hubs, Nisi rims and Universal brakes, etc

There was large cycling fan base in Panama where I grew up and it was somewhat easier to get better parts when somebody upgraded.

So back to the premise of this post. I always wanted the super bikes from my era and I focus my collecting and riding bikes of that period. Mainly late 70's to mid 80's racing bikes. That's all I want now.

Back then, I wanted to get away as far as possible from the Continentals, AMF, Royce Unions and similar type quality bike. To this date, I have no interest or desire for any of these bikes. Not a rant against people that fancy these bikes and I am probably hurting somebody's feeling when lumping the AMF/Royce Unions with the Continentals... apologies just in case.

I am sure there are other people in this forum that focus only on classic racing bikes, correct?
yuyax is offline  
Old 08-25-09, 01:21 PM
  #2  
noglider 
aka Tom Reingold
 
noglider's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: High Falls, NY, USA
Posts: 38,526

Bikes: 1962 Rudge Sports, 1971 Raleigh Super Course, 1971 Raleigh Pro Track, 1974 Raleigh International, 1975 Viscount Fixie, 1982 McLean, 1996 Lemond (Ti), 2002 Burley Zydeco tandem

Mentioned: 464 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6166 Post(s)
Liked 647 Times in 444 Posts
You bet, and that is one favorite period here. I think a lot of it has to do with our ages. I'm 48 years old and I also got into cycling and bikes at the age of 14. I also started out with a crappy Italian bike. It was an Atala Giro D'Italia with Simplex derailleurs. I ended up changing to Suntour derailleurs which gave me a taste of wrenching and upgrading.

So I was 17 through 23 in the years 1978 through 1984, and those are also the years when I worked as a bike mechanic, and yes, I am very sentimental about top of the line bikes from that era. So our admiration may not be entirely rational. But maybe there's something to it. Let's see. The lines seem cleaner than on today's bikes, yet it was a period when all components were aluminum rather than part aluminum and part steel. We learned that aluminum spoke nipples and rear sprockets were very bad ideas.
__________________
Tom Reingold, tom@noglider.com
New York City and High Falls, NY
Blogs: The Experienced Cyclist; noglider's ride blog

“When man invented the bicycle he reached the peak of his attainments.” — Elizabeth West, US author

Please email me rather than PM'ing me. Thanks.
noglider is offline  
Old 08-25-09, 01:34 PM
  #3  
Retem
Paste Taster
 
Retem's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Sacramento, CA
Posts: 4,392

Bikes: , Jury Bike, Moto Outcast 29, Spicer standard track frame and spicer custom steel sprint frame.

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I personally love everything save for beach cruisers, trikes and recumbents...
Retem is offline  
Old 08-25-09, 02:01 PM
  #4  
cs1
Senior Member
 
cs1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Clev Oh
Posts: 7,007

Bikes: Specialized, Schwinn

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 182 Post(s)
Liked 9 Times in 8 Posts
Originally Posted by noglider View Post
You bet, and that is one favorite period here. I think a lot of it has to do with our ages. I'm 48 years old and
I'm 51 and the Chicago built Paramounts with full Campy are my holy grail. Trouble is they're just getting more expensive every day. So, I settled on a 95 Waterford. It's almost a Paramount.
cs1 is offline  
Old 08-25-09, 02:49 PM
  #5  
Chombi
Senior Member
 
Chombi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 11,139

Bikes: 1986 Alan Record Carbonio, 1985 Vitus Plus Carbone 7, 1984 Peugeot PSV, 1972 Line Seeker, 1986(est.) Medici Aerodynamic (Project), 1985(est.) Peugeot PY10FC

Mentioned: 21 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 141 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
This post reminds me of my college years in the 80's with my younger rrother when we really got into cycling. We'd spendtthe weekends at college riding all day and catching the LBS open at the end of the day to ogle at bikes and gear. We'd be mesmerized by the row of hanging high end italian framesets and marvel at the low hollow bell tones we can get when we tap the down tubes with our fingers near the water bottle bosses. just like testing watermelons in the market (I think we drove the LBS workers nuts everytime we showed up and tap on their framesets). My dream bike back then were the usual italian brands. Guerciotti, Ciocc, Masi, Colnago, Gios Torino, Gianni Motta, Cinelli....and many more, but I did have a soft heart for 3Renshos, Gitanes and of course, Peugeots.
The dreamiest bikes back then were the unobtainuim brands that appeared in the bike magazines like the occasional Columbines and the super rare bikes like the Technobull. My brother and I wore out those magazines looking at them till pages were literally falling off from them.....Those were certainly golden cycling years for me and my brother!!

Chombi
84 Peugeot PSV

Last edited by Chombi; 08-26-09 at 03:32 PM.
Chombi is offline  
Old 08-25-09, 03:22 PM
  #6  
yuyax
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Northern Virginia
Posts: 309
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Another reason for not 'appreciating' the heavy weights (Continentals et al) is that I also worked at a bike shop during my college (Buffalo) and post college days (NoVA), every time we had to service them, tune ups, repair/replace, it was a huge a pain in the butt.

Repairs took longer and where more difficult and the hourly estimates, most of the time, went out the window. When we were writing up these bikes on the bill, I was trained to write in the description '*** White' or '*** Yellow', etc. ***=Piece of S...

I did learn that the best mechanics where the ones that could fix the ***'s rapidly and efficiently. Anybody could work on the fancy bikes but the ***'s required more skills

Edited to add: I don't know why the words above were ***. Let's try this P O S = White, P O S = Yellow. P O S = Piece of Sh...

Last edited by yuyax; 08-25-09 at 03:31 PM.
yuyax is offline  
Old 08-25-09, 03:28 PM
  #7  
evwxxx
FalconLvr
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: SW Virginia
Posts: 1,190

Bikes: 62 Falcon, 58 Raleigh Lenton Gran Prix, 74 Raleigh Pro, 75 Raleigh Int, 75 Raleigh Comp, 76 Colnago Super, 75 Crescent, 80 Peugeot PX10, plus others too numerous to mention!

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Same as the OP here. Growing up I was lucky to get a Falcon for Christmas in '62 so I was able to be snobby and "look down" on the Varsities and Continentals, Royce Unions (my buddy had one) etc. Guess that was luck of the draw, if I had got a Continental that Christmas instead, I would probably be a Schwinn lover now!
evwxxx is offline  
Old 08-25-09, 03:32 PM
  #8  
Retem
Paste Taster
 
Retem's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Sacramento, CA
Posts: 4,392

Bikes: , Jury Bike, Moto Outcast 29, Spicer standard track frame and spicer custom steel sprint frame.

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
it seems schwinn & huffy are the only brands I don't particularly care for
mostly all others including some free spirits (the Austrian and Belgian ones) I can manage
Retem is offline  
Old 08-25-09, 03:33 PM
  #9  
yuyax
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Northern Virginia
Posts: 309
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Yes, I forgot the Free Spirits and Huffys. How could I have forgotten those bike shop nightmares?
yuyax is offline  
Old 08-26-09, 07:33 AM
  #10  
yuyax
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Northern Virginia
Posts: 309
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by noglider View Post
You bet, and that is one favorite period here. I think a lot of it has to do with our ages. I'm 48 years old and I also got into cycling and bikes at the age of 14. I also started out with a crappy Italian bike. It was an Atala Giro D'Italia with Simplex derailleurs. I ended up changing to Suntour derailleurs which gave me a taste of wrenching and upgrading.

So I was 17 through 23 in the years 1978 through 1984, and those are also the years when I worked as a bike mechanic, and yes, I am very sentimental about top of the line bikes from that era. So our admiration may not be entirely rational. But maybe there's something to it. Let's see. The lines seem cleaner than on today's bikes, yet it was a period when all components were aluminum rather than part aluminum and part steel. We learned that aluminum spoke nipples and rear sprockets were very bad ideas.
noglider- Do you have a Cuevas or a Paris Sport? A Cuevas is also on my long list... Maybe I'll find one in an estate sale or barn someday...
yuyax is offline  
Old 08-26-09, 08:59 AM
  #11  
noglider 
aka Tom Reingold
 
noglider's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: High Falls, NY, USA
Posts: 38,526

Bikes: 1962 Rudge Sports, 1971 Raleigh Super Course, 1971 Raleigh Pro Track, 1974 Raleigh International, 1975 Viscount Fixie, 1982 McLean, 1996 Lemond (Ti), 2002 Burley Zydeco tandem

Mentioned: 464 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6166 Post(s)
Liked 647 Times in 444 Posts
Cuevas was made in Queens, New York, right? I remember them as being beautiful, and many owners loved them, but I heard a few stories of failures, so I wonder if they really are reliable. Of course, each one is different. I have neither a Cuevas or a Paris Sport.

I have an old Cyclesport which is also labeled ROLLS. I don't know much about it. It's not pretty, but it's very light and rides very well. It's a 52 cm and I'm looking to sell it. I'm guessing it's from about 1975. I got it at a police auction and gave it to my daughter. She now has a nicer bike, hence the impending sale.
__________________
Tom Reingold, tom@noglider.com
New York City and High Falls, NY
Blogs: The Experienced Cyclist; noglider's ride blog

“When man invented the bicycle he reached the peak of his attainments.” — Elizabeth West, US author

Please email me rather than PM'ing me. Thanks.
noglider is offline  
Old 08-26-09, 09:06 AM
  #12  
top506
Death fork? Naaaah!!
 
top506's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: The other Maine, north of RT 2
Posts: 4,748

Bikes: Seriously downsizing.

Mentioned: 36 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 361 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 59 Times in 41 Posts
Originally Posted by noglider View Post
I also started out with a crappy Italian bike. It was an Atala Giro D'Italia with Simplex derailleurs. I ended up changing to Suntour derailleurs which gave me a taste of wrenching and upgrading.
Yeah, me too! It's still out in the barn and gets ridden from time to time.
Top
__________________
You know it's going to be a good day when the stem and seatpost come right out.

(looking for a picture and not seeing it? Thank the Photobucket fiasco.PM me and I'll link it up.)
top506 is offline  
Old 08-26-09, 09:31 AM
  #13  
molarface
Junior WHAT?!?!
 
molarface's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 149
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
The OP statement that he wanted to get the bikes he lusted after as a kid are, I believe, nearly universal, and specific, to men.
In High School I hawked pictures to motocross racers taken on an old Yashicamat to pay for my rusty Austin Healy. I really wanted a Nikon and a Jag. Then college and grad school......
Eventually, I started collecting all the 60' and 70's Nikon stuff I wanted 'back then' (and more, of course). Got an E Type, too (that was a mistake and a half!).
The thing is, I notice lots of us old geezers doing that sort of thing. Never seen a woman do it though, (they just buy shoes).
So it's a genetic thing. You can't fight it.

Don
molarface is offline  
Old 08-26-09, 10:18 AM
  #14  
Kommisar89
Bottecchia fan
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Colorado Springs, CO
Posts: 3,508

Bikes: 1959 Bottecchia Milano-Sanremo (frame), 1966 Bottecchia Professional (frame), 1971 Bottecchia Professional (frame), 1973 Bottecchia Gran Turismo, 1974 Bottecchia Special, 1977 Bottecchia Special (frame), 1974 Peugeot UO-8

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 27 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by noglider View Post
You bet, and that is one favorite period here. I think a lot of it has to do with our ages. I'm 48 years old and I also got into cycling and bikes at the age of 14. I also started out with a crappy Italian bike. It was an Atala Giro D'Italia with Simplex derailleurs. I ended up changing to Suntour derailleurs which gave me a taste of wrenching and upgrading.

So I was 17 through 23 in the years 1978 through 1984, and those are also the years when I worked as a bike mechanic, and yes, I am very sentimental about top of the line bikes from that era. So our admiration may not be entirely rational. But maybe there's something to it. Let's see. The lines seem cleaner than on today's bikes, yet it was a period when all components were aluminum rather than part aluminum and part steel. We learned that aluminum spoke nipples and rear sprockets were very bad ideas.
We're about the same age, I'm 47, but I think I was into bikes early, around age 10 and lusting after an Italian bike. Where/when I grew up Varsitys, Continentals, Huffys, Murrays, AMFs, Royce Unions, the crappy Free Spirits - those were all the kind of bikes your parents who knew nothing about bicycles bought you. I'm sure there are some folks today who have fond memories of riding one and keep one out in the garage but I really don't remember anybody lusting after those bikes back in the day. Of course my "dream" bikes then had to be something a bit more modest than top of the line pro gear so when I bought that Bottecchia Special in 1974 at the ripe old age of 12 I had achieved cycling Nirvana

That only lasted until I was around 17-18, 1979-80-ish. Then I got into cars and motorcycles and then the Army and I didn't get back into bikes until the early 90's. All that fancy, schmancy stuff like Guerciotti, Ciocc, Masi, Colnago, Gios Torino, Gianni Motta, and Cinelli was stuff I had bearly heard of if at all in the 70's and far outside my reach anyway. My interest was in factory bikes like Atala, Bottecchia, Gitane, or Peugeot. Stuff that they actually had at Joe's Bike and Lawnmower in the 70's not stuff that you had to special order from some place in New York.

A "great" bike for me and my friends back then had lugs - we didn't know or care how they were filed - and it was light - 25-28-lbs was considered light - and it had a drivetrain from a venerable European manufacturer - so what if it was plastic. And we were happy if we could get Valentino derailleurs. At least it was Campagnolo.

When I go out riding today with a group where everyone is on modern bikes, I don't see anybody riding a $14,000 Pinarello Prince with 11-speed Super Record. And I find it hard to believe everybody was riding around on top of the line pro bikes back in the 70's any more then they are today. So I'm happy to collect and ride the common man's bikes. Besides, I'll hold an 80's top of the line Bottecchia up against any of those fancy names. If they weren't already priced out of the stratosphere I'd have one in my collection now
__________________
1959 Bottecchia Milano-Sanremo(frame), 1966 Bottecchia Professional (frame), 1971 Bottecchia Professional (frame),
1973 Bottecchia Gran Turismo, 1974 Bottecchia Special, 1977 Bottecchia Special (frame),
1974 Peugeot UO-8, 1988 Panasonic PT-3500, 2002 Bianchi Veloce, 2004 Bianchi Pista
Kommisar89 is offline  
Old 08-26-09, 10:20 AM
  #15  
Kommisar89
Bottecchia fan
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Colorado Springs, CO
Posts: 3,508

Bikes: 1959 Bottecchia Milano-Sanremo (frame), 1966 Bottecchia Professional (frame), 1971 Bottecchia Professional (frame), 1973 Bottecchia Gran Turismo, 1974 Bottecchia Special, 1977 Bottecchia Special (frame), 1974 Peugeot UO-8

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 27 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by molarface View Post
The thing is, I notice lots of us old geezers doing that sort of thing. Never seen a woman do it though, (they just buy shoes).
So it's a genetic thing. You can't fight it.

Don
You haven't seen my wife's or my mother's doll collections then. It's like there is a shrine to Shirley Temple in the living room and the lady ain't even dead yet
__________________
1959 Bottecchia Milano-Sanremo(frame), 1966 Bottecchia Professional (frame), 1971 Bottecchia Professional (frame),
1973 Bottecchia Gran Turismo, 1974 Bottecchia Special, 1977 Bottecchia Special (frame),
1974 Peugeot UO-8, 1988 Panasonic PT-3500, 2002 Bianchi Veloce, 2004 Bianchi Pista
Kommisar89 is offline  
Old 08-26-09, 10:36 AM
  #16  
NYC_zx10
I Need Intervention
 
NYC_zx10's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 160
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by noglider View Post
Cuevas was made in Queens, New York, right? I remember them as being beautiful, and many owners loved them, but I heard a few stories of failures, so I wonder if they really are reliable. Of course, each one is different. I have neither a Cuevas or a Paris Sport.
The grandson of Fransisco Cuevas, Fernando, had a shop (Cuevas Cycles) on the corner my block, here in Queens, NY. They would always take trips to trails. He was big into MTBing and I actually bought my 07 Specialized Hardrock Disk Pro from them to go along on these trips and got into MTBing because of them. Good people.

They closed up shop a few years ago when Fernando (the grandson), developed a severe case of bone marrow cancer. I remember Him having a One off FULL CF road frame hanging inside the shop that his father/grandfather made. It was the most gorgeous frame I have EVER laid my hands on. I remember picking it up one time and being able to just swing it around like nothing was in my hand. Different than the ones that have been produced since.

They also had some vintage Cuevas bikes in there that were just amazing in craftsmanship.

I recently asked a local from the neighborhood who worked at the shop about Fernando, and he says he's very ill and is bound to pass away soon.

Last edited by NYC_zx10; 08-26-09 at 10:59 AM.
NYC_zx10 is offline  
Old 08-26-09, 10:59 AM
  #17  
perichbrothers
vintage road bike addict
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: san diego
Posts: 82
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Retem View Post
I personally love everything save for beach cruisers, trikes and recumbents...
If by beach cruisers you are clumping in all american fat-tired bikes from the 30's to 60's,
that is the same as clumping all road bikes high and low end into the same bracket.
There are some really cool prewar bikes, shelby's, schwinns, monarchs out there.

And sometimes its just fun to cruise around and hop curbs!

TP
perichbrothers is offline  
Old 08-26-09, 11:11 AM
  #18  
Retem
Paste Taster
 
Retem's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Sacramento, CA
Posts: 4,392

Bikes: , Jury Bike, Moto Outcast 29, Spicer standard track frame and spicer custom steel sprint frame.

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by perichbrothers View Post
If by beach cruisers you are clumping in all american fat-tired bikes from the 30's to 60's,
that is the same as clumping all road bikes high and low end into the same bracket.
There are some really cool prewar bikes, shelby's, schwinns, monarchs out there.

And sometimes its just fun to cruise around and hop curbs!

TP
I did not say balloon tired cantilever, truss or twin top tube frames camel backs or any variant I said beach cruisers

you know the raked out stretched poor handling heaps that wobble down the road

I would love to get my hands on an old cantilever bike or a worksman cycle truck or other wise

I simply dislike beach cruiser, trikes and recumbents
Retem is offline  
Old 08-26-09, 12:19 PM
  #19  
noglider 
aka Tom Reingold
 
noglider's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: High Falls, NY, USA
Posts: 38,526

Bikes: 1962 Rudge Sports, 1971 Raleigh Super Course, 1971 Raleigh Pro Track, 1974 Raleigh International, 1975 Viscount Fixie, 1982 McLean, 1996 Lemond (Ti), 2002 Burley Zydeco tandem

Mentioned: 464 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6166 Post(s)
Liked 647 Times in 444 Posts
That's very sad about Francisco Cuevas. But thanks for the update anyway.
__________________
Tom Reingold, tom@noglider.com
New York City and High Falls, NY
Blogs: The Experienced Cyclist; noglider's ride blog

“When man invented the bicycle he reached the peak of his attainments.” — Elizabeth West, US author

Please email me rather than PM'ing me. Thanks.
noglider is offline  
Old 08-26-09, 12:22 PM
  #20  
SirMike1983 
On the road
 
SirMike1983's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 1,638

Bikes: U.S. and British Roadsters

Mentioned: 18 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 163 Post(s)
Liked 6 Times in 6 Posts
I'm at the opposite end-- I don't like road bikes or racing bicycles particularly. I do rather like the Raleigh Clubman bicycles though in that category. I often see people oogle old road or race or track frames. I guess they're alright, but I just can't get excited about them.

My focus is on Raleigh 3 speeds and American balloon tire bicycles. I'm a big fan of the Raleigh 3 speeds (have 2 Sports and a Tourist) and also the classic balloon tire bikes from the 1930s-1950s. I own Schwinn and Columbia bicycles for ballooners (have a 1936 Schwinn-Henderson and a 1950 Columbia Three Star De Luxe).

As mentioned above these are NOT beach cruisers, but are rather serious road machines capable of handling many road surfaces and situations. Hills are a pain with the single speed gearing, and the lone coaster brake is a little weak, but they make wonderful riders. They're a much different experience to ride than many of the modern machines-- a different universe really. I don't care for the modern "gonzo beach cruiser" look, and I don't much care for the reproductions. But I really do like the classic ballooners.

Also a note on the Huffy stuff-- it's easy to lump all Huffy/Huffman bikes into a single lump and call them trash. But in the years when the company was Dayton, and later Huffman, they made a quality product. I'm especially thinking 1930s-1950s. The much later "Huffy" department store type bikes are not great, but even that has an exception here or there.
__________________
Classic American and British Roadsters, Utility Bikes, and Sporting Bikes (1935-1979):
http://bikeshedva.blogspot.com/
SirMike1983 is offline  
Old 08-26-09, 12:48 PM
  #21  
yuyax
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Northern Virginia
Posts: 309
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
To put in simply, my wish list consists of at least one bike from each bike craftsman profiled in the book 'The Custom Bicycle' in addition to a Team Miyata.

My wish list also includes other bikes with full Shimano Dura Ace from the mid 80's, Mavic SSC also mid 80's (think Lemond) and Suntour Superbe.

I have already accumulated several Pro Miyata frames (I keep missing finding the Team) and various parts here and there. I just need to move from the pack rat stage to the building stage, get an automotive parts cleaner, etc, etc, etc

NYC and noglider - Not to hijack this thread to a NYC thread... I didn't know that Cuevas was so close to me. I lived in Flushing and I spent a lot of time at the Kissena Track, Kissena Cycles-Al Toufield, etc. I was always drooling at the stuff Al had in his shop. Specially the Zeus stuff.

BTW, in case you folks did not know, Cuevas was the frame builder for the Paris Sport line.

Some might find this site very interesting and check out the old racing photos:

http://www.jamieswan.net/pages/history/history1.html
yuyax is offline  
Old 08-26-09, 01:18 PM
  #22  
NYC_zx10
I Need Intervention
 
NYC_zx10's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 160
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by yuyax View Post
To put in simply, my wish list consists of at least one bike from each bike craftsman profiled in the book 'The Custom Bicycle' in addition to a Team Miyata.

My wish list also includes other bikes with full Shimano Dura Ace from the mid 80's, Mavic SSC also mid 80's (think Lemond) and Suntour Superbe.

I have already accumulated several Pro Miyata frames (I keep missing finding the Team) and various parts here and there. I just need to move from the pack rat stage to the building stage, get an automotive parts cleaner, etc, etc, etc

NYC and noglider - Not to hijack this thread to a NYC thread... I didn't know that Cuevas was so close to me. I lived in Flushing and I spent a lot of time at the Kissena Track, Kissena Cycles-Al Toufield, etc. I was always drooling at the stuff Al had in his shop. Specially the Zeus stuff.

BTW, in case you folks did not know, Cuevas was the frame builder for the Paris Sport line.

Some might find this site very interesting and check out the old racing photos:

http://www.jamieswan.net/pages/history/history1.html

That was an awesome read!

I'm going to stop in there one day and talk to the guy.

Maybe he can build me a frame...
NYC_zx10 is offline  
Old 08-26-09, 02:32 PM
  #23  
Flying Merkel
Senior Member
 
Flying Merkel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Costa Mesa CA
Posts: 2,641
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 4 Times in 4 Posts
I'll never forget 1979. My father decided to get me a good bike for high school graduation. I had to pick it out- but he set a budget of $200.00. After weeks of research, we got a Univega Viva Sport. One of the last smart choices I've made.
The shop, Bicycle Man of Orange (CA). had rows of Cinellis and Bianchis. Maybe a few Masis, can't swear to it.

The Cinellis were perfect. They looked like a racing bike that a man would ride. Brifters, carbon fiber, 10 & 11 speed sprocket sets still somehow seem like cheating to me. I want one of those Cinellis. And my Viva Sport back. Between those two, just about all road-bike bases are covered
Flying Merkel is offline  
Old 08-26-09, 02:43 PM
  #24  
Retem
Paste Taster
 
Retem's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Sacramento, CA
Posts: 4,392

Bikes: , Jury Bike, Moto Outcast 29, Spicer standard track frame and spicer custom steel sprint frame.

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Kommisar89 View Post
You haven't seen my wife's or my mother's doll collections then. It's like there is a shrine to Shirley Temple in the living room and the lady ain't even dead yet
+1
not one of my old bikes cost more than most of here doll's outfits yes that is it clothes for dolls cost more than my ride
Retem is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information

Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.