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Just how big is the Miyata Cult?

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Just how big is the Miyata Cult?

Old 05-11-19, 09:54 AM
  #676  
kingston 
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Originally Posted by Dfrost View Post
Hereís my first Aravis when new, and a year later. Itís much darker now after 10,000 miles, and still super comfortable.
I liked my Aspin so much when it was new that I got an Aravis for another bike. What you call broken in I call worn out. I don't think it's that comfortable anymore, so I'm still trying to decide if I like the saddle enough to replace the leather every other year. In the meantime I'm using other saddles that last longer.
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Old 05-12-19, 07:14 PM
  #677  
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Originally Posted by The Golden Boy View Post
First- Congratulations! The Miyata 1000 is a "lifetime bike." This is a 1985 model- it's a pretty slick model. It's a triple butted frame with Deore XT and 600/Ultegra components- from back when Deore XT was the top of the line. So basically it was a top of the line frame with top of the line and 2nd from top of the line components. It was pretty close to a flagship model bike. IMO- a bike of this caliber is as capable as any modern tourer, while being much more elegant and graceful.

https://www.ragandbone.ca/PDFs/Miyat...logue%2085.pdf

This would have come with 700c wheels with a 5 speed rear end. My guess is it was probably spaced around 126. Just a guess- but you'd probably be able to get a 130 in there without much trouble- so yes- you could go to 10 speed with this frame- I'm running a 10 speed 130 hub on a 1985 frame. However, this bike is equipped with friction bar end shifters- these shifter do not have the fine tuning ability to accurately shift between the cogs on a 10 speed spaced cog.

This is a "grail" level touring bike. It's a "touring bike." It's not a "go fast" bike. Touring bikes generally have brakes that are more robust than "racing" style bikes. They're meant to stop a bike, a rider and a rider's touring load. This bike has Shimano XT cantilever brakes- among the very best brakes ever made. If you were to switch to Ultegra side pull brakes- it probably wouldn't have the stopping power of properly set up cantilevers. Additionally, you'd have the unused cantilever bosses sticking out of the fork and stays- and that would look stupid. Not only would it look stupid, but it would also broadcast that the owner was stupid enough to not use cantilever brakes.

While I believe people may underestimate the handling of touring frames as heavy and slow- I think you should also realize these bikes were meant to haul heavy loads over great distances. They were not built to be lightweight, "quick" handling, or particularly nimble. This may not be the ideal bike to have a powermeter on. You may like the BioPace rings, you may not, or you may not notice the difference.

IMO/IME- this is a bike to have wide tires on (in excess of 32mm- more like 35 or so).

This is a bike that was meant to have around a 26 pound fighting weight. If you're expecting this bike to handle and respond like a 21 pound racing bike- you may be disappointed.

You have a full-on touring bike with a full compliment of custom sized racks that were designed and fitted to this bike. To remove them kind of neuters what this bike is about. The rear racks look to be custom fitted to this size frame with the rack bosses in that particular location.

You also may wish to remove and set aside the Miyata Radial tires- of if you're into parting out your stuff- the Miyata Radial tires are pretty unique and could possibly bring some decent money.

People that are into "modern" bikes don't often understand how awesome the Mirrycle mirror for non-aero levers actually are. They look really old fashioned- but they ALWAYS point directly behind you- regardless of which way your head is turned- and it's just a quick flick of your eyes- you don't need to look for and locate the mirror, then think of where the mirror is pointing.. you glance at the mirror and you know where it's pointing and immediately see what's behind you.

You have a REALLY REALLY desirable bike- based on your questions and comments- it seems that this bike may not be particularly good fit for you. I would urge you to evaluate what that bike was created to do- vs. what you expect that bike to do. There's a good chance you could meet in the middle- but I would also not try to fit the square peg into the round hole.

best!
As itís similar to my 1986 1000 posted above, thanks for this info! Iíve had mine for a couple years and find Iíve settled on leaving it as is, stock. Mine has the 105 indexed 6sp downtube shifters, which I find brilliant. I was also climbing 8-10% this weekend with gears to spare, albeit unloaded. I actually keep quite a fast pace on the 1000 and the biopace really suits the frame, gives you a comfortable steady ďkeeps on truckingĒ feeling, but not slow by any means.
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Old 05-13-19, 01:22 PM
  #678  
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Originally Posted by The Golden Boy View Post
First- Congratulations! The Miyata 1000 is a "lifetime bike." This is a 1985 model- it's a pretty slick model. It's a triple butted frame with Deore XT and 600/Ultegra components- from back when Deore XT was the top of the line. So basically it was a top of the line frame with top of the line and 2nd from top of the line components. It was pretty close to a flagship model bike. IMO- a bike of this caliber is as capable as any modern tourer, while being much more elegant and graceful.

https://www.ragandbone.ca/PDFs/Miyat...logue%2085.pdf

This would have come with 700c wheels with a 5 speed rear end. My guess is it was probably spaced around 126. Just a guess- but you'd probably be able to get a 130 in there without much trouble- so yes- you could go to 10 speed with this frame- I'm running a 10 speed 130 hub on a 1985 frame. However, this bike is equipped with friction bar end shifters- these shifter do not have the fine tuning ability to accurately shift between the cogs on a 10 speed spaced cog.

This is a "grail" level touring bike. It's a "touring bike." It's not a "go fast" bike. Touring bikes generally have brakes that are more robust than "racing" style bikes. They're meant to stop a bike, a rider and a rider's touring load. This bike has Shimano XT cantilever brakes- among the very best brakes ever made. If you were to switch to Ultegra side pull brakes- it probably wouldn't have the stopping power of properly set up cantilevers. Additionally, you'd have the unused cantilever bosses sticking out of the fork and stays- and that would look stupid. Not only would it look stupid, but it would also broadcast that the owner was stupid enough to not use cantilever brakes.

While I believe people may underestimate the handling of touring frames as heavy and slow- I think you should also realize these bikes were meant to haul heavy loads over great distances. They were not built to be lightweight, "quick" handling, or particularly nimble. This may not be the ideal bike to have a powermeter on. You may like the BioPace rings, you may not, or you may not notice the difference.

IMO/IME- this is a bike to have wide tires on (in excess of 32mm- more like 35 or so).

This is a bike that was meant to have around a 26 pound fighting weight. If you're expecting this bike to handle and respond like a 21 pound racing bike- you may be disappointed.

You have a full-on touring bike with a full compliment of custom sized racks that were designed and fitted to this bike. To remove them kind of neuters what this bike is about. The rear racks look to be custom fitted to this size frame with the rack bosses in that particular location.

You also may wish to remove and set aside the Miyata Radial tires- of if you're into parting out your stuff- the Miyata Radial tires are pretty unique and could possibly bring some decent money.

People that are into "modern" bikes don't often understand how awesome the Mirrycle mirror for non-aero levers actually are. They look really old fashioned- but they ALWAYS point directly behind you- regardless of which way your head is turned- and it's just a quick flick of your eyes- you don't need to look for and locate the mirror, then think of where the mirror is pointing.. you glance at the mirror and you know where it's pointing and immediately see what's behind you.

You have a REALLY REALLY desirable bike- based on your questions and comments- it seems that this bike may not be particularly good fit for you. I would urge you to evaluate what that bike was created to do- vs. what you expect that bike to do. There's a good chance you could meet in the middle- but I would also not try to fit the square peg into the round hole.

best!
Thank you very much! .... very good info

I know that this is not a 'fast bike' .... I used to own a Surly LHT with 26 inch wheels and rode many miles on it

I was looking for a bike for commuting (40+km/day), a winter bike with mudguards and dynamo lights (I leave home every morning at 5am 12 months a year) and for some Audax rides. Most/many of the guys who ride Audax in the UK use old bikes (Bob Jackson, Carlton, Raleigh, Hetchins etc etc), and some of the newer bikes that many favour are bikes such as Genesis Croix De Fer, All City etc as they can take wider wheels with mudguards .... Many also use lightweight bags such as Apidura and Miss Grape etc

I first thought that I might get a frame and build the bike with good components .... I looked at Surly Straggler as I was really keen on hydraulic disc brakes but also looked at having a custom Bob Jackson world tour with disc brakes fancy lugs, fender mounts etc but when I worked out the cost of building the bike it was a lot

Then I started researching older bikes, and I had 2 in mind .... A Koga Miyata that can take mudguards (I've owned 3 Koga Miyata bikes so far, a 1981 Koga Miyata Full Pro, a 1982 Koga Miyata Road Champ, and a Koga Miyata Road Winner) .... all lovely bikes

and the other bike was a 1980's Trek 720

I managed to find the Miyata 1000 in my size at a reasonable price so I am well happy (I'm hoping to recieve it by the weekend) I could not find a Trek in my size and they also fetch high prices (theres one (not my size) listed on the ebay USA site for $800 or best offer)

My initial thought was to change components, such as groupset, wheels etc and customise it my way

so, after reading your post, and also speaking to my LBS, I will try to keep the bike as original as possible, however I will have a new wheelset built ... I will keep the original wheelset though incase I ever wish to ride fully loaded tours

Once I have the bike, I will take it to my LBS so that he can sort out the cables and give the bike a full service ....

I will keep the wheels for now and fit Continental GP5000 clinchers in 32mm (I have the GP5000TL (tubeless) on my Trek Emonda SL6 and these tyres are amazing (I cycled 2100km so far and hey still have lots of life in them, zero punctures on crappy roads, and they are fast) ... I also want to try some Compass tyres

Wheels that I will have build will be HED Belgium Plus rims, Sapim CXray spokes, Son 28 front Dynamo and I'm not sure on the rear hub yet .... I want a strong hub (touring hub) and might consider another Chris King hub (I have Chris King R45 hubs (ceramic bearing upgrade) on my current HED Belgium Plus rims), but at this stage, I don't know what the rear spacing is . I like the HED rims as I wish to use tubeless tyres (I've been using tubeless for 2 years now)... My LBS is regarded as one of the best wheelbuilers in the UK and he will give his opinion

Front rack has to go .... I have no need for it and it looks heavy .... I will keep it in case I wish to do touring. I do however wish to replace it with a lighter smaller rack that has a dynamo light mount (such as this one .... ps any suggestions for one like this in black?):



rear rack will remain (it allows me to use large pannier bags if I wish to go on a cycling fishing/camping trip)... mudguards definately remain ... I like the Gilles Berthoud bags aswell:



saddle has to go .... I have a Brooks C17 Carved Cambium in a grey colour which I will use for the meantime, until I can afford the Giles Berthoud Aravis open (with the cutouts) .... I had the normal Aravis saddle on my Surly and it was super comfy from day 1, and is class

So, once I ride the bike, I will decide on the gearing, but a powermeter is a definate ... so I might /probably will) change the crankset to a dura ace from that period (if there is a crankset in triple) ...or similar (I would love something like this but in a triple): I'm not keen for biopace as my Trek has normal round crankset .... if I am going to use this bike for lots of miles and as a training bike, when I decide to use my Trek for a long audax ride, I don't wnat any drastic changes



the powermeter will be the Stages (vintage looking one):


I've been using a powermeter for a while now .... I use it as a pacing tool and once you start using it and undertanding things, it is a very handy tool, especially when you combine the data with your heart data while you ride
... many people who use powermeters say that it's a 'must have' ... if you plan to do Polarized training (a powermeter is a definate), combined with heart rate


so .... once I have the bike, I will change the tyres, have it serviced and ride it for a few weeks before deciding .... I will be able to ride with the CTC club (Cycling Touring Club) ... they ride every thursday in my area and normally ride 100km with a pub / lunch stop .... all old guys with amazing classic steel bikes ....it looks odd going on a club ride and you are the only person with a carbon bike

as mentioned, I used to have a Surly LHT with Schwalbe Marathon Supreme tyres, back rack and standard 26 inch wheelset, so I know that I'm not riding a fast bike .... I was never slow on the Surly though .... from what I have found, a Miyata 1000 in a 57cm size weighs 27.5 lbs (12.4kg) ... this bike is a 50cm with a 535 mm top tube which fits me fine .... I will also habe a proper bike fit done (costs £200) ... plus change to lighter wheels and it will help with the climbs

If I can ride a 200km Audax with 1800 meters of climbing at an average speed of 25km/hr, I will be very happy (the majority of people average 23km/hr)

so any advice will be appreciated!

Last edited by dim; 05-13-19 at 01:56 PM.
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Old 06-24-19, 07:09 AM
  #679  
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Does anyone know what color I have -- I recently got a 58cm 91 Miyata 914 that looks black (serial is T and 58 is stamped beneath it on BB shell), the catalog says the colors were Opal, and Charcoal Blue (maybe that's 3 colors ...) The catalog shows a white bike. My bike has very faint green flecks that can be seen in the sun. I'm inclined to say it's Opal, but wonder what the white bike is, and if mine could be charcoal (or blue)

My bike mechanic friend saw the internal routing points of the rear brake cable as possible stress fracture sites, but I read here that reinforced frames were OK -- my frame appears to have metal plates beneath the plastic bits that guide the cable into the top tube, I assume it is reinforced ...




'91 Miyata 914



From Miyata catalog
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Old 06-24-19, 07:28 AM
  #680  
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Could mine be a Black Sable SE? I don't see SE written on the decals, but it looks similar, though my components match the non-SE 914.



'91 Miyata 914 SE
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