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-   -   nomenclature pet peeves (https://www.bikeforums.net/classic-vintage/602446-nomenclature-pet-peeves.html)

Zaphod Beeblebrox 11-12-09 03:56 PM

Fendeurs. ;)

EjustE 11-12-09 04:09 PM

to funny

tatfiend 11-12-09 04:14 PM

And if you have a English car it has a bonnet and boot, not a hood and trunk. Lots of nomenclature differences between the American and English languages, even though we Americans claim to speak English, but what I object to is the misuse of words or nomenclature that makes little or no sense.

How about IGH hub. Another redundancy I see used regularly.

Bianchigirll 11-12-09 06:44 PM


Originally Posted by sykerocker (Post 10026560)
Curtains? You're down to living in a car? Sell a couple of bikes, woman!

OH I made a wordsmith error. I was thinking of fender skirts but called them curtains boy do I feel like a blonde

USAZorro 11-12-09 09:05 PM


Originally Posted by Bianchigirll (Post 10026514)
OK if fenders are those thingies you used to protect boats. what do you attach the curtains to on a 56 Cadillac?

You'd argue that a '56 Cadillac isn't a boat? :eek: :D

RobbieTunes 11-12-09 09:23 PM


Originally Posted by bbattle (Post 10025633)
"irregardless" people who use this non-word should be shot.
"loose" instead of "lose"
"breaks" instead of "brakes" Hooked on Phonics = can't spell worth a flip

"So I bought this here pista track bike the other day." :(

Not only was it the same thing, it was the exact same thing. ??

Today's tendency to turn nouns into verbs is quite annoying. "Incentivize"? But in Shakespeare's time triple negatives were common.

"alot" It should be two words, not one. A<space>lot.

Quite putting apostrophe s after a word to denote the plural form. Just an s or es is needed. Apostrophes indicate possession or a contraction.

The correct phrase is "I couldn't care less". To say "I could care less" indicates one does care somewhat; the opposite of what the writer wishes to convey.

The bottom bracket is somewhat confusing as it refers to a particular section of the bicycle frame as well as the component that goes inside(of itself?).

Is it an axle or spindle? I've always used spindle to describe the metal rod to which the crankset is attached but othes use axle.

Group, groupe, gruppo? I suppose it depends upon whether one is talking about Shimano, Huret or Campagnolo.

One nice aspect of English is its ability to simply acquire any word it wants from any other language and make it part of the English language. The French find this to be a horrible concept but they'll still order a 'hamburger' in Paris. But not if the language police are around. ;) It is perfectly acceptable to use the word derailleur instead of derailer, provided it is spelled correctly.

Cool. You put a lot of thought into this. I majored in English because the dept. had the best looking coeds. As such, I plead not ignorance but laziness. I'll try to clean up my act.

Citoyen du Monde 11-13-09 12:42 AM


Originally Posted by sykerocker (Post 10026573)
Sorry, they're only mudguards if installed on a Raleigh, Triumph, or Morgan. If you install them on a Schwinn, Harley-Davidson or Chevrolet, they're fenders.

No doubt, if you install them on a Peugeot, Voxan or Citroen there's a language constabulary that will make sure you're not trying to pollute the French language with an English word.

In French the word is the literal translation of mudguard, the same in Italian. In German and Dutch it is respectively "protection steel" and "splatter board".

Citoyen du Monde 11-13-09 01:24 AM

The word that I most commonly see misused on bicycle-related fori is "road" in place of "rode". I follow bicycle fori in German, French, Dutch and Italian and must however say that errors are no more or less common on English-language fori, so I suppose we must not read all too much into the errors that we see.

streik 11-13-09 02:00 AM

What about toe clips? Not only do they not actually "clip", i don't see them clip - or whatever - my toes either... Straps for your toes? You're going to have to think ahead at least two minutes if you want to unstrap your toes for a stop at a red light.

bbattle 11-13-09 04:54 AM

I'm from the South and we often say "I'm fixing to go to the store"; meaning, "I'm about to go to the store".

We say "look up under there" which means "look under there". Up must've been added for emphasis.

Anytime we can throw a few extra syllables into a word or sentence it's all good.

Speaking of the way foreignors talk, how come we drive on the parkway and park on the drive way? In England, you'd get arrested for driving on the pavement.

rhm 11-13-09 07:19 AM


Originally Posted by tatfiend (Post 10026797)
And if you have a English car it has a bonnet and boot, not a hood and trunk. Lots of nomenclature differences between the American and English languages, even though we Americans claim to speak English, but what I object to is the misuse of words or nomenclature that makes little or no sense.

How about IGH hub. Another redundancy I see used regularly.

+1. Terminology for things that were invented in the last couple centuries has often developed differently, and it's not a big deal. There are interesting cases in Arabic, where terms for car parts etc are derived either from French or from English, depending on sphere of influence. This is how language develops.

Nor am I too worried about the run of the mill misspellings. I mean, who cares if my breaks didn't work so I road off the rode, it was to funny, I was lucky I didn't brake my numb skull. No misspellings there, according to the spell checker!

The bicycle terminology that bothers me, culled from the above posts:

The toeclip/clipless/rattrap/quill pedal thing.

The cog/sprocket/freewheel/cluster/cassette thing.

noglider 11-13-09 08:19 AM

A pedant is a teacher. Pedantic means more than "teacher-like". It can also mean someone who is preachy or picky, which is the meaning I'm using for myself. So "pedantic wordy" is not redundant.

"Very unique" makes me cringe doubly. Something is unique or it isn't. It's remarkable enough that something is unique, but it makes NO SENSE to say "very unique."

Similarly, now Subaru has a little badge on some of their cars that say "PZEV - partially zero emissions vehicle." What's a partial zero?

I wonder why saying "alloy" when one really means "aluminum" doesn't bother me. Yes, pretty much every metal we use is alloyed (yes, it is a verb, too), because the metal in its raw form doesn't have the desired properties.

rhm 11-13-09 09:04 AM


Originally Posted by noglider (Post 10028229)
"Very unique" makes me cringe doubly. Something is unique or it isn't. It's remarkable enough that something is unique, but it makes NO SENSE to say "very unique."

Okay, but there are gradations of uniqueness. The Raleigh Twenty, for example, has a unique hinge mechanism; no other bike has it, so the word unique needs no qualification. Thus the word is used correctly. On the other hand, a lot of people customize their Twenties in unique ways. By one standard or another, all those modifications are unique, but let's face it, some of them are more unique than others. Arguably the word unique is not correctly used in such cases, but people use it and we understand it and there's no use griping about it.


Originally Posted by noglider (Post 10028229)
I wonder why saying "alloy" when one really means "aluminum" doesn't bother me. Yes, pretty much every metal we use is alloyed (yes, it is a verb, too), because the metal in its raw form doesn't have the desired properties.

I don't know the whole story, but I assume there's a historical explanation for this, going back to England in the 40's. When Alumin(i)um was first refined, it was not thought to be a very useful material; but as people got better at alloying it and working it, uses became more widespread. Various alloys of aluminum got patent names, such as hiduminium, dural, etc. Nothing unusual about that; alloys of steel also have patent names, such as 531. But for some reason, some aluminum alloy(s?) were just called alloy. Sturmey archer hub shells were stamped ALLOY, not hiduminium etc. http://www.classiclightweights.co.uk/asc250.jpg
I'm pretty sure that's why bicycle people started using alloy for aluminum. But is this usage still common today, or is it unique (ahem) to the older generation?

Tundra_Man 11-14-09 08:30 AM

Working in the tech field I hear the word "architect" frequently used as a verb as in, "the web site administrators need to architect a solution to the performance problems we've been having." Drives me nuts to hear that word used in that way.

If my car won't start I guess I'll have to mechanic it.

soonerbills 11-14-09 09:45 AM

Why should we be upset about the butchery of language? ... the Constitution gives people who have not a clue the right to vote and the right to free speech.... The results should be predictable....

I plead not ignorance but laziness.

I agree with Robbie...
of this I'm profoundly guilty.... but many times I purposely write my statements in a manner emoting "backwood" schooling

Ex Pres 11-14-09 09:50 AM

Is it a handlebar or handlebars?

KonaBuyer 11-14-09 09:55 AM


Originally Posted by noglider (Post 10028229)
A pedant is a teacher. Pedantic means more than "teacher-like". It can also mean someone who is preachy or picky, which is the meaning I'm using for myself. So "pedantic wordy" is not redundant.

I was referring to the irony of "wordy". A made up word to indicate a love of words. Surely there is a real word, or set of words, to convey this concept. The more standard spelling appears to be "wordie", parallel to "foodie".

soderbiker 11-14-09 09:58 AM

to the op'er .
I try my best to spell correctly and hyphenate when needed .
but hows your Swedish spelling may i ask ?
yours-truly.

i say ," give it a break !"
/T

Bianchigirll 11-14-09 10:18 AM

nonglider are you a member of P.O.E.M.?

Homebrew01 11-14-09 10:59 AM

My old employer had IT guys to "administrate" the servers. I could care less what they should of said. They didn't orientate there speech for good grammer.

sykerocker 11-14-09 11:52 AM


Originally Posted by USAZorro (Post 10027339)
You'd argue that a '56 Cadillac isn't a boat? :eek: :D

Yes, I would. The 59 and 60 Cadillac was a boat. As was the 58-60 Lincoln and Continental. The 56 Cadillac was actually a reasonably sized American car for it's day. Less than a foot longer than the same year Chevrolet.

sykerocker 11-14-09 11:55 AM


Originally Posted by noglider (Post 10028229)
Similarly, now Subaru has a little badge on some of their cars that say "PZEV - partially zero emissions vehicle." What's a partial zero?

A prime example that some government bureaucrat wasn't thinking when they came out with "low emissions vehicle" (the dirtiest category) years ago. Nobody ever figured that that engine standards would get cleaner step by step.

Why they never just came up with something like "level 1 emissions", "level 2 emissions", etc. is beyond me. At least that's open-ended.

rat fink 11-14-09 03:39 PM

i love this thread. :)

fuzz2050 11-14-09 04:37 PM

Can I add my terrible annoyance for the lack of distinction between 'sealed' bearings and cartridge bearings. The two mean very different things, but often the words are used interchangeably. Makes for all sorts of confusing talk.

And everyone knows the proper plural of octopus isn't octopi, but rather octopods.

Mos6502 11-14-09 06:39 PM


Originally Posted by fuzz2050 (Post 10030450)
Can I add my terrible annoyance for the lack of distinction between 'sealed' bearings and cartridge bearings. The two mean very different things, but often the words are used interchangeably. Makes for all sorts of confusing talk.

And everyone knows the proper plural of octopus isn't octopi, but rather octopods.

Octopods would be referring to types of octopi (ie there are many types of octopods) octopi is the plural form of octopus. ;)


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