Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Classic & Vintage
Reload this Page >

For the love of English 3 speeds...

Notices
Classic & Vintage This forum is to discuss the many aspects of classic and vintage bicycles, including musclebikes, lightweights, middleweights, hi-wheelers, bone-shakers, safety bikes and much more.

For the love of English 3 speeds...

Old 02-17-15, 11:37 AM
  #6401  
Banned
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 7,150
Mentioned: 93 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1361 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 422 Times in 282 Posts
I would tell that bike shop to give you everyone of those junk 3 speed bikes designed for riding the left side of the roadway. Its just garbage taking up shop space and of course no one knows how to work on English junk. Its like those old Brit cars and Lucas electrics.
crank_addict is offline  
Old 02-17-15, 02:41 PM
  #6402  
Senior Member
 
gster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Toronto
Posts: 2,567

Bikes: 1971 Hercules, 1978 Raleigh Superbe, 1978 Raleigh Tourist, 1964 Glider 3 Speed, 1967 Raleigh Sprite 5 Speed, 1968 Hercules AMF 3 Speed, 1972 Raleigh Superbe, 1976 Raleigh Superbe, 1957 Flying Pigeon, 1967 Dunelt 3 Speed

Mentioned: 57 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1027 Post(s)
Liked 419 Times in 283 Posts
Originally Posted by adventurepdx
That bike shop sounds jerky, but a lot of shops simply "don't get" three speeds. One shop made suggestions for my old Rudge Sports, which was in perfectly good shape (mostly due to sixty-fiver.) They said what would make things "better" is replace the wheel with a single speed and replace the crankset with a modern cotterless. Of course the Rudge chainring is most of the charm of the bike! To be fair, they were generally a decent shop that did good work, but their focus was on new.
The bicycle co ops here in Toronto have a decent supply of 3 speed parts and Jerry the mechanic at Community Bicycle Network teaches a workshop on 3 speed hubs every fall.
I'm always on the lookout for spare hubs and triggers etc as the price for a simple washer/nut on Ebay can be expensive. Come spring there's always a discard bike or two at the side of the road and even if it's beyond repair it could be a good parts donor.
gster is offline  
Old 02-18-15, 06:49 PM
  #6403  
Senior Member
 
Velocivixen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: The Great Pacific Northwest
Posts: 4,525
Mentioned: 87 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 400 Post(s)
Liked 37 Times in 26 Posts
Hi all you three speeders. I have a question in advance of having an issue. My Phillips now sports Kenda 26 1 3/8" tires that measure 33mm wide. I ordered a Col de la Vie in the same size & accd to Harris's site typically measures 38.5mm. Of course there are others who measure theirs as narrower. My rim is CR18. Fender follows current tire fine width wise. If the new tire is wider, how do I go about "massaging" the fender out a little wider.

I recall online someone installing metal fenders and they had to widen them out a little and they went into great details with photos, but now, for the life of me, I can't find that site.
Velocivixen is offline  
Old 02-18-15, 07:09 PM
  #6404  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 17,090
Mentioned: 477 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3768 Post(s)
Liked 6,425 Times in 2,549 Posts
Originally Posted by Velocivixen
Hi all you three speeders. I have a question in advance of having an issue. My Phillips now sports Kenda 26 1 3/8" tires that measure 33mm wide. I ordered a Col de la Vie in the same size & accd to Harris's site typically measures 38.5mm. Of course there are others who measure theirs as narrower. My rim is CR18. Fender follows current tire fine width wise. If the new tire is wider, how do I go about "massaging" the fender out a little wider.

I recall online someone installing metal fenders and they had to widen them out a little and they went into great details with photos, but now, for the life of me, I can't find that site.
Maybe this photo set from southpawboston? The example fender is alu, however, rather than steel, but the latter should still be able to be re-shaped.
nlerner is offline  
Old 02-18-15, 07:19 PM
  #6405  
Senior Member
 
sykerocker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Ashland, VA
Posts: 4,420

Bikes: The keepers: 1958 Raleigh Lenton Grand Prix, 1968 Ranger, 1969 Magneet Sprint, 1971 Gitane Tour de France, 1973 Raleigh Tourist, 3 - 1986 Rossins, and a '77 PX-10 frame in process.

Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 221 Post(s)
Liked 237 Times in 129 Posts
Regarding the sub thread over the last couple of pages on bike shops with a ****ty attitude:

First off, I don't defend them. In fact, I was happy as all get out when Rowlett's in Richmond, VA announced they were closing down; mainly because the staff there was always quick to belittle anyone that came in there who wasn't on the latest carbon fiber wonderbike. They were the only shop in town who'd rag me for the stuff I ride. Not helped by my knowing that I had more years of experience repairing bikes than anyone that worked there, with the possible exception of the owner.

However, such attitudes come from a variety of sources: 1. Pure staff snobbishness (aka, childishness). Indefensible, and should be grounds for employee termination. It certainly would have been at the shop I worked at in Erie, PA 1969-74. 2. Not profitable enough to bother learning how. Most bicycle shops nowadays don't really repair bicycles. They swap defective or worn parts. Actually figuring out what's wrong with a vintage bike and how to fix it takes too much time, too much effort, and doesn't bring in enough revenue when they could turn out three or four modern bikes in the same time it takes to figure yours out (assuming they don't know in the first place. 3. You're not a desirable customer. You're not riding something current, easily repairable to their skills, so you're not going to be profitable enough to bother with.

In mundane life I work for a Honda/Yamaha/CanAm motorcycle shop. And we don't take on vintage Hondas or Yamahas. Mainly because the customer isn't riding them because of a love of antique motorcycles, they're riding them because you can buy them for $500.00 or less. He's probably a #3 in the shop's eyes. And that customer's attitude on repairs is all to often the same as purchasing the bike in the first place - unrealistic regarding what it'll cost, and quick to freak when you give them the estimate of what it'll cost to get their bike running. The big difference in this scenario is that when you're talking a 3-4 week backlog on a motorcycle repair, you have to put your time on the customers who are riding new or at least recent bikes. They're the long term repeat customers.

Odds are, the guy at the bike shop saw you in one of these three categories - most likely #3 . At least I hope so. While #1 is totally indefensible, the other two have something of a business sense about them, trying to cull out the losing customers and just keeping the profitable. Even though its damned unfair.

There's only two answers to this: 1. Find a shop that finds it profitable and desirable to work on vintage and obsolescent bicycles. 2. Learn to work on your own. In the long run, #2 is easier and cheaper.
__________________
Syke

“No one in this world, so far as I know — and I have searched the records for years, and employed agents to help me — has ever lost money by underestimating the intelligence of the great masses of the plain people. Nor has anyone ever lost public office thereby.”

H.L. Mencken, (1926)

sykerocker is offline  
Old 02-18-15, 07:23 PM
  #6406  
Senior Member
 
sykerocker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Ashland, VA
Posts: 4,420

Bikes: The keepers: 1958 Raleigh Lenton Grand Prix, 1968 Ranger, 1969 Magneet Sprint, 1971 Gitane Tour de France, 1973 Raleigh Tourist, 3 - 1986 Rossins, and a '77 PX-10 frame in process.

Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 221 Post(s)
Liked 237 Times in 129 Posts
Originally Posted by Velocivixen
Hi all you three speeders. I have a question in advance of having an issue. My Phillips now sports Kenda 26 1 3/8" tires that measure 33mm wide. I ordered a Col de la Vie in the same size & accd to Harris's site typically measures 38.5mm. Of course there are others who measure theirs as narrower. My rim is CR18. Fender follows current tire fine width wise. If the new tire is wider, how do I go about "massaging" the fender out a little wider.

I recall online someone installing metal fenders and they had to widen them out a little and they went into great details with photos, but now, for the life of me, I can't find that site.
My method was to grab the edge of the fender or fender stay (whichever is less and will still give you the necessary clearance) in the jaws of a medium sized crescent wrench and use it as a lever to gently spread the part outwards. Little bits at a time, and made sure you're working on both sides to keep the spreading even.
__________________
Syke

“No one in this world, so far as I know — and I have searched the records for years, and employed agents to help me — has ever lost money by underestimating the intelligence of the great masses of the plain people. Nor has anyone ever lost public office thereby.”

H.L. Mencken, (1926)

sykerocker is offline  
Old 02-18-15, 07:43 PM
  #6407  
Senior Member
 
forestine's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: Winnipeg, MB
Posts: 100

Bikes: 2008 Electra Huli Huli, 1973 Eatons Glider, 1979 Sekine mixte, 197? Supercycle rustbucket

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
While their reasoning may have leaned towards 2/3, the guy's attitude was really indefensible. You don't roll your eyes at someone. You treat people with respect whether or not you think they're profitable and worth your time. I think it would have been completely fair and reasonable to flat out say that they didn't have the skills, tools or interest (profit, etc) to fix my bike. They could have explained why, given me a recommendation for say, a community shop where I could learn to fix it myself, or whatever. How do they stay open? I guess the clique they pander to has enough money to sustain them. Too bad. I have worked in retail for a long time and if I talked to people like that, I'd be fired.
forestine is offline  
Old 02-18-15, 08:56 PM
  #6408  
Senior Member
 
Salubrious's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: St. Paul, MN
Posts: 1,588

Bikes: Too many 3-speeds, Jones Plus LWB

Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 352 Post(s)
Liked 254 Times in 113 Posts
Originally Posted by Velocivixen
Hi all you three speeders. I have a question in advance of having an issue. My Phillips now sports Kenda 26 1 3/8" tires that measure 33mm wide. I ordered a Col de la Vie in the same size & accd to Harris's site typically measures 38.5mm. Of course there are others who measure theirs as narrower. My rim is CR18. Fender follows current tire fine width wise. If the new tire is wider, how do I go about "massaging" the fender out a little wider.

I recall online someone installing metal fenders and they had to widen them out a little and they went into great details with photos, but now, for the life of me, I can't find that site.
I'd be surprised if this is even an issue. The Kendas fit my Raleigh, both my Humber Sports, A friend's Phillips Sport; can't think of Brit bike made with 650A rims that they won't fit. Other tires, like the Continental City rides and the Michelins are more svelt so they are no worries. The Kendas are pretty bulbous and they are 37mm; I don't think an extra mm is going to make a problem.

The big problem is likely if you can get those tire to sit nicely on the rims- CR18s are kinda narrow.
Salubrious is offline  
Old 02-18-15, 10:01 PM
  #6409  
Senior Member
 
Velocivixen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: The Great Pacific Northwest
Posts: 4,525
Mentioned: 87 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 400 Post(s)
Liked 37 Times in 26 Posts
@Salubrious - good to know. My Kendas measure 33+mm on those rims. I guess I'll find out tomorrow.
Velocivixen is offline  
Old 02-18-15, 10:08 PM
  #6410  
aka Tom Reingold
 
noglider's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: New York, NY, and High Falls, NY, USA
Posts: 40,574

Bikes: 1962 Rudge Sports, 1971 Raleigh Super Course, 1971 Raleigh Pro Track, 1974 Raleigh International, 1975 Viscount Fixie, 1982 McLean, 1996 Lemond (Ti), 2002 Burley Zydeco tandem

Mentioned: 505 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7214 Post(s)
Liked 2,252 Times in 1,325 Posts
Your Col de la Vies will fit fine. You won't have to spread your fenders.
__________________
Tom Reingold, tom@noglider.com
New York City and High Falls, NY
Blogs: The Experienced Cyclist; noglider's ride blog

“When man invented the bicycle he reached the peak of his attainments.” — Elizabeth West, US author

Please email me rather than PM'ing me. Thanks.
noglider is offline  
Old 02-18-15, 10:52 PM
  #6411  
Senior Member
 
gster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Toronto
Posts: 2,567

Bikes: 1971 Hercules, 1978 Raleigh Superbe, 1978 Raleigh Tourist, 1964 Glider 3 Speed, 1967 Raleigh Sprite 5 Speed, 1968 Hercules AMF 3 Speed, 1972 Raleigh Superbe, 1976 Raleigh Superbe, 1957 Flying Pigeon, 1967 Dunelt 3 Speed

Mentioned: 57 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1027 Post(s)
Liked 419 Times in 283 Posts
Originally Posted by noglider
Your Col de la Vies will fit fine. You won't have to spread your fenders.
Hey! None of that!
gster is offline  
Old 02-18-15, 11:06 PM
  #6412  
Senior Member
 
Velocivixen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: The Great Pacific Northwest
Posts: 4,525
Mentioned: 87 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 400 Post(s)
Liked 37 Times in 26 Posts
You guys are funny. I'll let you know how it goes. I'll even take some photos.
Velocivixen is offline  
Old 02-19-15, 11:40 AM
  #6413  
Senior Member
 
adventurepdx's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Portland, Oregon
Posts: 1,023
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 162 Post(s)
Liked 65 Times in 47 Posts
Originally Posted by Salubrious
The big problem is likely if you can get those tire to sit nicely on the rims- CR18s are kinda narrow.
Col de la Vies fit fine on CR18s. I know from experience.
adventurepdx is offline  
Old 02-19-15, 12:04 PM
  #6414  
Senior Member
 
Velocivixen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: The Great Pacific Northwest
Posts: 4,525
Mentioned: 87 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 400 Post(s)
Liked 37 Times in 26 Posts
I've been wondering about taking a bike with 126 mm dropout (derailleur bike), and making it a 3 speed. The dropout on my Phillips is 115, so obviously I'd need a longer axle SA 3 speed hub for a conversion. Right?

Is is there a vintage 3 speed hub with longer axle? Or would I need to stick with modern SA?
Velocivixen is offline  
Old 02-19-15, 12:22 PM
  #6415  
Senior Member
 
Salubrious's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: St. Paul, MN
Posts: 1,588

Bikes: Too many 3-speeds, Jones Plus LWB

Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 352 Post(s)
Liked 254 Times in 113 Posts
That rim is such a life saver!- new life for many 3-speeds...

I have seen AW hubs with wider axles that would allow spacers. Plan B- cold set the frame to the smaller width.

********************

A question of my own- anyone ever hear of a Westwood rim (28" x 1 1/2", rod brake style) in alloy with 32 holes?? I have a 70s Tourist and am thinking of setting it up a vintage SA drum brake hub in the front.

Last edited by Salubrious; 02-19-15 at 12:26 PM.
Salubrious is offline  
Old 02-19-15, 12:23 PM
  #6416  
Senior Member
 
BGBeck's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: SoCal
Posts: 85

Bikes: 1976 Raleigh Sports Trek 8.4 DS

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
FWIW

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JIIj...em-subs_digest
BGBeck is offline  
Old 02-19-15, 01:26 PM
  #6417  
Senior Member
 
BigChief's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Posts: 3,240
Mentioned: 103 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1299 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 103 Times in 85 Posts
Finished my Rudge downtube graphic. Thanks to noglider for providing me a template. Hard to know the color exactly without an example in front of me. Waterslides on black paint tend to darken a bit, so I may make some further adjustments. If anyone wants one, I posted a zip file containing a JPEG, TIFF in 300 DPI ready to print and the original PSD Photoshop work file in case anybody wants to tinker with it.https://www.crystalspringfarm.net/AA/...owntube008.zip
Attached Images
File Type: jpg
rudge_sports.jpg (22.5 KB, 89 views)
BigChief is offline  
Old 02-19-15, 02:19 PM
  #6418  
aka Tom Reingold
 
noglider's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: New York, NY, and High Falls, NY, USA
Posts: 40,574

Bikes: 1962 Rudge Sports, 1971 Raleigh Super Course, 1971 Raleigh Pro Track, 1974 Raleigh International, 1975 Viscount Fixie, 1982 McLean, 1996 Lemond (Ti), 2002 Burley Zydeco tandem

Mentioned: 505 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7214 Post(s)
Liked 2,252 Times in 1,325 Posts
Pretty good job, @BigChief.
__________________
Tom Reingold, tom@noglider.com
New York City and High Falls, NY
Blogs: The Experienced Cyclist; noglider's ride blog

“When man invented the bicycle he reached the peak of his attainments.” — Elizabeth West, US author

Please email me rather than PM'ing me. Thanks.
noglider is offline  
Old 02-19-15, 03:33 PM
  #6419  
Senior Member
 
Salubrious's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: St. Paul, MN
Posts: 1,588

Bikes: Too many 3-speeds, Jones Plus LWB

Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 352 Post(s)
Liked 254 Times in 113 Posts
I agree! What would it take to do that for a Humber Sports?
Salubrious is offline  
Old 02-19-15, 05:07 PM
  #6420  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 1,797
Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 403 Post(s)
Liked 144 Times in 107 Posts
Originally Posted by Velocivixen
I've been wondering about taking a bike with 126 mm dropout (derailleur bike), and making it a 3 speed. The dropout on my Phillips is 115, so obviously I'd need a longer axle SA 3 speed hub for a conversion. Right?

Is is there a vintage 3 speed hub with longer axle? Or would I need to stick with modern SA?
Hopefully, somebody who actually knows something will answer this question. But, that's never stopped me before, so until the right answer comes:

According to Sheldon's (which includes some info about this) site, the axle needs to be 31 mm longer than the OLD. SA had at least 3 axle lengths for the AW hubs which were:

5 3/4 (146 mm 115mm OLD)
6 1/4 (159 mm 128 mm OLD)
6 13/32 (163 mm 132 OLD)

Replacement axles in all three lengths appear to be available either at Harris, Niagara, or ebay. Prices shipped to you on the order of $15 to $25.

My understanding (which is based just on google knowledge -- I have no experience) is that any of these axles will fit into any of the AW hubs as all the machinings, gear, slot, etc, are dimensionally the same with respect to the hub body. All the length differences are accounted for outside the cones.
So, my guess is that you could plug one of the longer axles in an AW hub and have it spaced out for 126 mm or 130 mm. The 63 mm axles should work with either and just have a little extra length on the left side if used in a 120 mm or 126 mm hub.

If you were to do this, you may need to adjust spacer placement so that the right side axle nut works properly and you may need a different indicator chain. Just guessing. Dishing may be required.
desconhecido is offline  
Old 02-19-15, 05:11 PM
  #6421  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: hopewell lct NY
Posts: 192

Bikes: 1969 schwinn sting ray 3 speed stick ...1974 raleigh sports

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
rudge witworth on FB . brooks saddle . 200 obo .. scroll down about 5 or 6 bikes down .not mine .https://www.facebook.com/groups/TRADERS.ooo1/

Last edited by michaelz28; 02-19-15 at 05:15 PM.
michaelz28 is offline  
Old 02-19-15, 05:11 PM
  #6422  
Senior Member
 
BigChief's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Posts: 3,240
Mentioned: 103 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1299 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 103 Times in 85 Posts
Thanks. Anybody with moderate PhotoShop skills can do these. Cool thing is, you don't need anything more than a regular computer and printer to make your own decals. Since a printer doesn't put any ink where it sees white, you just put a white background behind your image and it will print as a transparency on decal paper. Now, I have to get to the grunt work of taking my bike apart and stripping the frame. Oh, and getting the fixed cup off the bottom bracket...that's always fun.
BigChief is offline  
Old 02-19-15, 05:15 PM
  #6423  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 17,090
Mentioned: 477 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3768 Post(s)
Liked 6,425 Times in 2,549 Posts
Originally Posted by desconhecido
Hopefully, somebody who actually knows something will answer this question. But, that's never stopped me before, so until the right answer comes:

According to Sheldon's (which includes some info about this) site, the axle needs to be 31 mm longer than the OLD. SA had at least 3 axle lengths for the AW hubs which were:

5 3/4 (146 mm 115mm OLD)
6 1/4 (159 mm 128 mm OLD)
6 13/32 (163 mm 132 OLD)

Replacement axles in all three lengths appear to be available either at Harris, Niagara, or ebay. Prices shipped to you on the order of $15 to $25.

My understanding (which is based just on google knowledge -- I have no experience) is that any of these axles will fit into any of the AW hubs as all the machinings, gear, slot, etc, are dimensionally the same with respect to the hub body. All the length differences are accounted for outside the cones.
So, my guess is that you could plug one of the longer axles in an AW hub and have it spaced out for 126 mm or 130 mm. The 63 mm axles should work with either and just have a little extra length on the left side if used in a 120 mm or 126 mm hub.

If you were to do this, you may need to adjust spacer placement so that the right side axle nut works properly and you may need a different indicator chain. Just guessing. Dishing may be required.
Yes, I've done that swap from 5 3/4" to 6 1/4" axles and used that wheel in a 120mm OLD frame. Stick a couple of 2mm washers on each side and you should be good to go. And, yes, you do need a longer indicator, however, which goes with that longer axle.
nlerner is offline  
Old 02-19-15, 05:27 PM
  #6424  
Abuse Magnet
 
arex's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Colorado
Posts: 1,886

Bikes: '91 Mtn Tek Vertical, '74 Raleigh Sports, '72 Raleigh Twenty, '84 Univega Gran Turismo, '09 Surly Karate Monkey, '92 Burley Rock-n-Roll, '86 Miyata 310, '76 Raleigh Shopper

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 150 Post(s)
Liked 170 Times in 85 Posts
Originally Posted by Velocivixen
I've been wondering about taking a bike with 126 mm dropout (derailleur bike), and making it a 3 speed. The dropout on my Phillips is 115, so obviously I'd need a longer axle SA 3 speed hub for a conversion. Right?

Is is there a vintage 3 speed hub with longer axle? Or would I need to stick with modern SA?
Dunno about old hubs, but the new ones come in spacings up to 130mm. Same hub, longer axle with built-in spacers. I used a new hub because to collect a rebuildable hub and all the little bits and pieces to make it work, I was approaching the cost of the new hub kit. In retrospect, I should've tried to find something narrower that didn't require cold-setting the frame.
arex is offline  
Old 02-19-15, 05:34 PM
  #6425  
Senior Member
 
Velocivixen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: The Great Pacific Northwest
Posts: 4,525
Mentioned: 87 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 400 Post(s)
Liked 37 Times in 26 Posts
That's good to know. I don't have a SA AW, but would like one (hint, hint). I'm thinking of doing a conversion on a bike. Hmmmm.
Velocivixen is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service -

Copyright © 2024 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.