Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Classic & Vintage
Reload this Page >

For the love of English 3 speeds...

Notices
Classic & Vintage This forum is to discuss the many aspects of classic and vintage bicycles, including musclebikes, lightweights, middleweights, hi-wheelers, bone-shakers, safety bikes and much more.

For the love of English 3 speeds...

Old 11-27-18, 04:20 PM
  #18676  
Full Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Canberra Australia
Posts: 240

Bikes: 30's Speedwell Club Racer, 40's Speedwell 'Z' racer, 50's Unknown Aussie with nice lugs, 50's Speedwell Roadster, 50's Repco Roadster, '63 Raleigh DL-1, 70's Raleigh Sprite, Puch Promenade with Nexus 8

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 149 Post(s)
Liked 30 Times in 23 Posts
Originally Posted by gster
Thanks, its' a work in progress with some more details to attend to come spring. I do have a nice set of drop bars that would look good but wouldn't suit my
riding style. The rear wheel/ hub (1961), although rust free and smooth shifting has a terrible warp that has been slightly corrected (by reefing on it).
I've never laced a wheel so that may be part of my continuing education....
I'm with you with the drop bars... I like to think I could do it and I like the look of them on certain bikes. Particularly vintage shaped handlebars - I have some late 30's bars shaped like Velo Oranges Randonneur bars that I may try with a long stem. But generally my neck doesn't like it, I'm fine with the speeds I can get to on non-drop bars, and I just like being able to take in my surroundings as I'm riding. It's part of the happy happy joy joy thing of the whole experience.
Learning lacing is a nice feather to have in your cap - there's some good paint by numbers instructions out there. Actually there's a good Raleigh wheel building manual - I'll see if I can find it. In my current times of thrift I've taken to buying cheap stainless laced wheels from the landfill shop to harvest spokes from. No breakages yet.
arty dave is offline  
Old 11-27-18, 04:34 PM
  #18677  
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 15
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Used to have an old raleigh 3 speed with the thumb shifter and the old collapsed Brooks seat and all, it was creaky a d heavy but really fun to cruise around on.
efleigh89 is offline  
Old 11-27-18, 05:04 PM
  #18678  
Senior Member
 
gster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Toronto
Posts: 2,567

Bikes: 1971 Hercules, 1978 Raleigh Superbe, 1978 Raleigh Tourist, 1964 Glider 3 Speed, 1967 Raleigh Sprite 5 Speed, 1968 Hercules AMF 3 Speed, 1972 Raleigh Superbe, 1976 Raleigh Superbe, 1957 Flying Pigeon, 1967 Dunelt 3 Speed

Mentioned: 57 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1027 Post(s)
Liked 419 Times in 283 Posts
Originally Posted by arty dave
I'm with you with the drop bars... I like to think I could do it and I like the look of them on certain bikes. Particularly vintage shaped handlebars - I have some late 30's bars shaped like Velo Oranges Randonneur bars that I may try with a long stem. But generally my neck doesn't like it, I'm fine with the speeds I can get to on non-drop bars, and I just like being able to take in my surroundings as I'm riding. It's part of the happy happy joy joy thing of the whole experience.
Learning lacing is a nice feather to have in your cap - there's some good paint by numbers instructions out there. Actually there's a good Raleigh wheel building manual - I'll see if I can find it. In my current times of thrift I've taken to buying cheap stainless laced wheels from the landfill shop to harvest spokes from. No breakages yet.
Yes, aesthetically the drop bars look good. I wish my back and neck agreed.
Lacing a wheel is on my list.
I like the recycling angle.
Good for everyone.
gster is offline  
Old 11-27-18, 05:30 PM
  #18679  
Senior Member
 
BigChief's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Posts: 3,240
Mentioned: 103 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1299 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 102 Times in 84 Posts
Originally Posted by efleigh89
Used to have an old raleigh 3 speed with the thumb shifter and the old collapsed Brooks seat and all, it was creaky a d heavy but really fun to cruise around on.
You should try it again sometime. Especially if you only rode one as a kid and didn't have the knowledge about setup you have now. They can be very pleasant to ride within their limits.
__________________
Inflate Hard
BigChief is offline  
Old 11-27-18, 08:59 PM
  #18680  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2018
Location: St. Louis, MO
Posts: 62

Bikes: 1953 Hercules, Late 50' Hercules Tourist, 1997 Raleigh M-40, 1964 Schwinn American

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 24 Post(s)
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
I apologize in advance if this question has been asked and answered but Iím curious about wheels. Can I run an alloy wheel on the front and keep the original steel on the rear? Thanks!
56ford is offline  
Old 11-27-18, 10:22 PM
  #18681  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 634
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 230 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 18 Times in 11 Posts
I'm afraid not, the polarity is different and so the bike will end up trying to go in two directions at once.
Cute Boy Horse is offline  
Old 11-28-18, 02:10 PM
  #18682  
Senior Member
 
gster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Toronto
Posts: 2,567

Bikes: 1971 Hercules, 1978 Raleigh Superbe, 1978 Raleigh Tourist, 1964 Glider 3 Speed, 1967 Raleigh Sprite 5 Speed, 1968 Hercules AMF 3 Speed, 1972 Raleigh Superbe, 1976 Raleigh Superbe, 1957 Flying Pigeon, 1967 Dunelt 3 Speed

Mentioned: 57 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1027 Post(s)
Liked 419 Times in 283 Posts
Originally Posted by Cute Boy Horse
I'm afraid not, the polarity is different and so the bike will end up trying to go in two directions at once.
I strongly disagree.
The heavier weight of the rear wheel (steel) will increase the momentum of the spinning wheel through centrifugal force
and therefore cause it to turn at a faster rate than the front wheel.
In time, when riding, (even at moderate speeds) you will find the speed and inertia of the rear wheel
will cause it to accelerate past the front.
This can happen quite suddenly and without warning.
This would be a dangerous situation for all concerned.
Rider and innocent bystanders alike.
gster is offline  
Old 11-28-18, 02:47 PM
  #18683  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2017
Posts: 1,018

Bikes: Diamond Back Apex, Mongoose IBOC Aluminum Road Bike, SR road bike

Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 515 Post(s)
Liked 165 Times in 115 Posts
Originally Posted by gster
I strongly disagree.
The heavier weight of the rear wheel (steel) will increase the momentum of the spinning wheel through centrifugal force
and therefore cause it to turn at a faster rate than the front wheel.
In time, when riding, (even at moderate speeds) you will find the speed and inertia of the rear wheel
will cause it to accelerate past the front.
This can happen quite suddenly and without warning.
This would be a dangerous situation for all concerned.
Rider and innocent bystanders alike.
You are both wrong, the reverse polarity can, and might cause levitation at the most inopportune times, but if you learn to control this, you then have an opportunity for a remake of E.T.
Sample of what could happen. --->
Ballenxj is offline  
Old 11-28-18, 03:01 PM
  #18684  
Senior Member
 
gster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Toronto
Posts: 2,567

Bikes: 1971 Hercules, 1978 Raleigh Superbe, 1978 Raleigh Tourist, 1964 Glider 3 Speed, 1967 Raleigh Sprite 5 Speed, 1968 Hercules AMF 3 Speed, 1972 Raleigh Superbe, 1976 Raleigh Superbe, 1957 Flying Pigeon, 1967 Dunelt 3 Speed

Mentioned: 57 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1027 Post(s)
Liked 419 Times in 283 Posts
Originally Posted by Ballenxj
You are both wrong, the reverse polarity can, and might cause levitation at the most inopportune times, but if you learn to control this, you then have an opportunity for a remake of E.T.
Sample of what could happen. --->https://youtu.be/gTVoFCP1BLg
I've read a NASA research paper on the subject.
You obviously have access to their TOP SECRET,
Area 51 experimental test video.
Is there a Flux Capacitor involved?
gster is offline  
Old 11-28-18, 03:05 PM
  #18685  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2017
Posts: 1,018

Bikes: Diamond Back Apex, Mongoose IBOC Aluminum Road Bike, SR road bike

Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 515 Post(s)
Liked 165 Times in 115 Posts
Originally Posted by gster
I've read a NASA research paper on the subject.
You obviously have access to their TOP SECRET,
Area 51 experimental test video.
Is there a Flux Capacitor involved?
Shhh, I cannot divulge that intel.
Ballenxj is offline  
Old 11-28-18, 03:13 PM
  #18686  
ambulatory senior
 
52telecaster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Location: Peoria Il
Posts: 6,215

Bikes: Austro Daimler modified by Gugie! Raleigh Professional and lots of other bikes.

Mentioned: 72 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1922 Post(s)
Liked 3,417 Times in 1,579 Posts
Originally Posted by 56ford
I apologize in advance if this question has been asked and answered but Iím curious about wheels. Can I run an alloy wheel on the front and keep the original steel on the rear? Thanks!
yes
52telecaster is offline  
Old 11-29-18, 11:35 AM
  #18687  
Phyllo-buster
 
clubman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Nova Scotia
Posts: 8,822

Bikes: roadsters, club bikes, fixed and classic

Mentioned: 132 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2284 Post(s)
Liked 2,012 Times in 1,237 Posts
Britain abandoned the guards on export models because of import tariffs based on weight, or so the popular wisdom goes.

Most of the dutch chainguards were and are reasonably light. Usually it's a metal frame with fibrous panels, almost like a leatherette (or plastic) so the weight penalty is minimal. These never went out of style in Holland, where a large segment of the urban population continues to commute by bike.
clubman is offline  
Old 12-01-18, 08:35 AM
  #18688  
Senior Member
 
BigChief's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Posts: 3,240
Mentioned: 103 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1299 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 102 Times in 84 Posts
Nice looking 1950 Humber in N.H.

https://nh.craigslist.org/bik/d/1950...747232601.html
__________________
Inflate Hard
BigChief is offline  
Old 12-01-18, 09:00 AM
  #18689  
Senior Member
 
gster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Toronto
Posts: 2,567

Bikes: 1971 Hercules, 1978 Raleigh Superbe, 1978 Raleigh Tourist, 1964 Glider 3 Speed, 1967 Raleigh Sprite 5 Speed, 1968 Hercules AMF 3 Speed, 1972 Raleigh Superbe, 1976 Raleigh Superbe, 1957 Flying Pigeon, 1967 Dunelt 3 Speed

Mentioned: 57 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1027 Post(s)
Liked 419 Times in 283 Posts
Originally Posted by BigChief
I would say that it was a fair price @ 275.00
Old
Complete
Good paint/decals
Dynohub
Looks like a 22"
gster is offline  
Old 12-01-18, 11:48 AM
  #18690  
Senior Member
 
Stadjer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2016
Location: Groningen
Posts: 1,307

Bikes: Gazelle rod brakes, Batavus compact, Peugeot hybrid

Mentioned: 84 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5822 Post(s)
Liked 941 Times in 718 Posts
Originally Posted by mtb_addict
Anybody know why the British decide to build so few bikes with full chain cover, unlike the Dutch?

As I understand the Dutch copied the original British Roadster which had a full chain cover. The Dutch kept the full chain cover and became the norm on almost all their bicycles. Looks like the British abandoned the full chain cover for some reason.
The Dutch copied a lot but also made a lot of changes for the Dutch market. The oil bath chaincase was a British invention, but I believe some improvement in chain technology allowed for just a full leather or fabric cover and that's probably when it became standard on Dutch bikes. It's nice if you don't want to do any maintenance like most Dutch, but if you have to anyway it's a pain in the ass. It makes changing a tube quite a job and it's opening them that wears them out quite quickly. It's a fiddly job that most people don't get right.

The main difference is that the Dutch abandon the full chain case if the first one is beyond repair, usually well before the bike has become an old beater. Fitting a new one is an expensive job, especially if you have it done. So often it gets replaces with a small chain guard or a guard that is only fully closed on one side, but on a new bike there shoulde be a full one. On my 40-year old Dutch roadster it's still on, but not perfectly and only after I learned the saddle stitch, used glue and repaired a hole with duct tape. Maybe I can take it off two more times before it's finished, and then it will be very hard to find a replacement in the right colour, seventies brown.

So actually it makes sense to abandon it and just oil and change the chain more frequently, especially if the bike is mainly for touring in nice weather than for a daily commute in suit in Dutch weather.

Originally Posted by clubman
Britain abandoned the guards on export models because of import tariffs based on weight, or so the popular wisdom goes.

Most of the dutch chainguards were and are reasonably light. Usually it's a metal frame with fibrous panels, almost like a leatherette (or plastic) so the weight penalty is minimal. These never went out of style in Holland, where a large segment of the urban population continues to commute by bike.
I'm pretty sure weight has never been much of a consideration for Dutch bikes. There were a lot of metal full chain cases in the 60's and 70's too, and these days it's more often hard plastic. The fabric ones are mostly for the (black) classic models.
Stadjer is offline  
Old 12-01-18, 10:05 PM
  #18691  
Senior Member
 
browngw's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Port Dover Ontario Canada
Posts: 1,533

Bikes: 1965 Dilecta Le Blanc, 1956 Royal Nord, 1972 Raleigh Sports, 1972 CCM Turismo,1976 SuperCycle Excalibur, 2014 Salsa Vaya, 2017 Felt DD70, 2019 Giant Lafree and others

Mentioned: 39 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 346 Post(s)
Liked 535 Times in 218 Posts
No tariffs between Britain and Canada at the time. I guess that's why we got the full chaincase as well. My 1979 DL1 sold in Hamilton ON.
__________________
We are what we reflect. We are the changes that we bring to this world. Ride often. -Geo.-
browngw is offline  
Old 12-01-18, 10:27 PM
  #18692  
Phyllo-buster
 
clubman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Nova Scotia
Posts: 8,822

Bikes: roadsters, club bikes, fixed and classic

Mentioned: 132 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2284 Post(s)
Liked 2,012 Times in 1,237 Posts
I think you're wrong. Canada and 23 others were founding members of GATT in 1947, whose job it was to reduce highly protectionist policies that had been in place dating back before the war and into the depression. It took decades to accomplish substantial reductions. The US continued to practice high tariffs with Europe for some time. GATT evolved into the WTO and continued the reduction of tariffs from an average of 40% in '47 to an average of 5% today but can't find numbers on the bike business. I'd assume there was some protectionism across most all sectors. The fact that some bikes made it here with full chainguards is not really important.

Last edited by clubman; 12-02-18 at 08:42 AM.
clubman is offline  
Old 12-02-18, 05:06 AM
  #18693  
Senior Member
 
BigChief's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Posts: 3,240
Mentioned: 103 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1299 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 102 Times in 84 Posts
I think customer preference is the main reason for the scarcity of enclosed chaincases in the US. I can think of many reasons they would not have been considered a desirable or practical feature in America during the early post war years.
__________________
Inflate Hard
BigChief is offline  
Old 12-02-18, 07:45 AM
  #18694  
ambulatory senior
 
52telecaster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Location: Peoria Il
Posts: 6,215

Bikes: Austro Daimler modified by Gugie! Raleigh Professional and lots of other bikes.

Mentioned: 72 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1922 Post(s)
Liked 3,417 Times in 1,579 Posts
I maintain a small bike share in peoria illinois. The bikes we use are breezers with a sa 5 speed hub and a chaincase. Its made of plastic and it sucks when you have to fix a flat in back. They are solid bikes but raliegh sports with an aw hub and a dyno upfront would be better in my book. Wouldnt be any heavier either.
52telecaster is offline  
Old 12-02-18, 09:19 AM
  #18695  
Old fart
 
JohnDThompson's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Appleton WI
Posts: 24,854

Bikes: Several, mostly not name brands.

Mentioned: 153 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3539 Post(s)
Liked 3,275 Times in 1,873 Posts
Originally Posted by BigChief
I think customer preference is the main reason for the scarcity of enclosed chaincases in the US. I can think of many reasons they would not have been considered a desirable or practical feature in America during the early post war years.
They make fixing a flat rear tire considerably more difficult.

Perhaps the popularity of tubeless tires lately will bring a resurgence of enclosed chain cases?
JohnDThompson is offline  
Old 12-02-18, 10:27 AM
  #18696  
Senior Member
 
BigChief's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Posts: 3,240
Mentioned: 103 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1299 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 102 Times in 84 Posts
Yes, flats for one. Also they require extra adjustment to avoid rattles. The advantage was keeping the oily chain away from clothing and road grit. Neither is much of an issue for kids or a recreational bicycle. A utility bike to get you to work and shopping never caught on in America like it did in England. The weather here is more extreme and the distances are too far. In my early childhood, the sight of an adult on a bicycle was very rare. Bicycles were for kids. The English roadsters for older kids, high school and collage students. The hockey stick chainguard was far more practical for them.
__________________
Inflate Hard
BigChief is offline  
Old 12-02-18, 11:55 AM
  #18697  
Senior Member
 
gster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Toronto
Posts: 2,567

Bikes: 1971 Hercules, 1978 Raleigh Superbe, 1978 Raleigh Tourist, 1964 Glider 3 Speed, 1967 Raleigh Sprite 5 Speed, 1968 Hercules AMF 3 Speed, 1972 Raleigh Superbe, 1976 Raleigh Superbe, 1957 Flying Pigeon, 1967 Dunelt 3 Speed

Mentioned: 57 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1027 Post(s)
Liked 419 Times in 283 Posts
Originally Posted by BigChief
Yes, flats for one. Also they require extra adjustment to avoid rattles. The advantage was keeping the oily chain away from clothing and road grit. Neither is much of an issue for kids or a recreational bicycle. A utility bike to get you to work and shopping never caught on in America like it did in England. The weather here is more extreme and the distances are too far. In my early childhood, the sight of an adult on a bicycle was very rare. Bicycles were for kids. The English roadsters for older kids, high school and collage students. The hockey stick chainguard was far more practical for them.
I have one bike (a '50 Hercules) with a full chaincase that's been apart and back together.

And it really is a pain in the a*s to do any work on it.
Even attaching the chain was an issue...

I had to invert the bike like this.
It still rattles and scrapes a bit but does look good.
gster is offline  
Old 12-02-18, 02:55 PM
  #18698  
Senior Member
 
Buellster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2018
Posts: 755
Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 213 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 6 Times in 5 Posts
Hey guys!
I'm back!
I've picked up something very odd.
It was advertised as a "single speed" but I was pretty sure I spotted an SA hub. Sure enough the ad said "SA single speed hub". I asked him about it and he just said "it's a single speed"
I went out and looked, paid all of 25 for it and found a 68 SA aw hub mounted in a 700c rim!
this bike may be exactly what I've been wanting to plug my 4 speed into!



The seat was tragically stolen off it, it was a brooks and one of the main reasons I wanted to get it. With the seat gone he cut the price in half and gave the whole thing to me for 25. At 50 the brooks would have been awesome, a 700c SA hub for 25 is still pretty amazing!
Buellster is offline  
Old 12-02-18, 04:36 PM
  #18699  
Senior Member
 
gster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Toronto
Posts: 2,567

Bikes: 1971 Hercules, 1978 Raleigh Superbe, 1978 Raleigh Tourist, 1964 Glider 3 Speed, 1967 Raleigh Sprite 5 Speed, 1968 Hercules AMF 3 Speed, 1972 Raleigh Superbe, 1976 Raleigh Superbe, 1957 Flying Pigeon, 1967 Dunelt 3 Speed

Mentioned: 57 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1027 Post(s)
Liked 419 Times in 283 Posts
Originally Posted by Buellster
Hey guys!
I'm back!
I've picked up something very odd.
It was advertised as a "single speed" but I was pretty sure I spotted an SA hub. Sure enough the ad said "SA single speed hub". I asked him about it and he just said "it's a single speed"
I went out and looked, paid all of 25 for it and found a 68 SA aw hub mounted in a 700c rim!
this bike may be exactly what I've been wanting to plug my 4 speed into!



The seat was tragically stolen off it, it was a brooks and one of the main reasons I wanted to get it. With the seat gone he cut the price in half and gave the whole thing to me for 25. At 50 the brooks would have been awesome, a 700c SA hub for 25 is still pretty amazing!
At $25.00 I'd say a GREAT deal.
Extra tall frame.
Looks like originally a 10 speed.
Chromed fork ends are a nice bonus as well
gster is offline  
Old 12-02-18, 09:49 PM
  #18700  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2018
Posts: 101
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 27 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
1939 time warp Raleigh sports tourist, ,bought today








1931 flashlight holder on handlebars!Will replace the aftermarket grips with a pair of original ones I got from England, and will find original style brake blocks. The wheels run true, rear could be touched up. Dunlap steel rims .tangent frame mount shifter works well. Came with owners sheet , original tools, original raleigh pump which still works, 4 spring steel pants clamps, and a really old Sturmey Archer all metal oil can w metal extension tube on top to reach hub oil port. Bought from son, father rode it from new until he died 15 years ago. Stored inside all of its 79 years and hardly ridden. Shiny paint and complete decals. A w 9 on rear 3 spd hub, 1939 , which also agrees w serial number. Will shine it up and get some better photos using the dslr.
owner said after he put new tires , brake blocks and handgrips on it he took it on a 10 mi ride with no issues.

Last edited by raleighroadster; 12-02-18 at 09:53 PM.
raleighroadster is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service -

Copyright © 2024 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.