Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Classic & Vintage
Reload this Page >

For the love of English 3 speeds...

Classic & Vintage This forum is to discuss the many aspects of classic and vintage bicycles, including musclebikes, lightweights, middleweights, hi-wheelers, bone-shakers, safety bikes and much more.

For the love of English 3 speeds...

Old 12-23-18, 08:50 AM
  #18901  
BigChief 
Senior Member
 
BigChief's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Posts: 2,946
Mentioned: 96 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1122 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 12 Times in 10 Posts
Originally Posted by gster View Post
Love Those MKS Pedals
I heard somewhere that MKS stopped making these. They re the best replacement roadster pedals I know of. Much better than using the later Raleigh pedals on older bikes IMO.
__________________
Inflate Hard
BigChief is offline  
Old 12-23-18, 09:01 AM
  #18902  
gster
Senior Member
 
gster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Toronto
Posts: 1,634

Bikes: 1971 Hercules, 1978 Raleigh Superbe, 1978 Raleigh Tourist, 1964 Glider 3 Speed, 1967 Raleigh Sprite 5 Speed, 1968 Hercules AMF 3 Speed, 1972 Raleigh Superbe, 1976 Raleigh Superbe, 1957 Flying Pigeon, 1967 Dunelt 3 Speed

Mentioned: 47 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 549 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 14 Times in 13 Posts
Originally Posted by BigChief View Post
I heard somewhere that MKS stopped making these. They re the best replacement roadster pedals I know of. Much better than using the later Raleigh pedals on older bikes IMO.
If that's the case I'd better stock up!
I've got one more set in the garage and I think the bike shop has a couple more.
gster is offline  
Old 12-23-18, 09:17 AM
  #18903  
BigChief 
Senior Member
 
BigChief's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Posts: 2,946
Mentioned: 96 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1122 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 12 Times in 10 Posts
Originally Posted by gster View Post
The new version...
Just a bit of daydreaming here...I was impressed with that black and white Canadian Superbe I mentioned earlier. Very fancy for a roadster. Different, but in a good way. Since this bike has the chrome ended fork, I'd be very tempted to do a total refinish of this bike and copy the black and white one. I might not be able to find a ready made "Superbe" transfer for the seat tube, but I'll bet I could find a font close enough to look good. My local sign shop could make up a nice vinyl transfer. White cable housings, white grips and , of course, a B66. Plus...I've been dying to buy a Beugler pin stripping tool and learn how to use it.
__________________
Inflate Hard

Last edited by BigChief; 12-23-18 at 09:23 AM.
BigChief is offline  
Old 12-23-18, 09:55 AM
  #18904  
gster
Senior Member
 
gster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Toronto
Posts: 1,634

Bikes: 1971 Hercules, 1978 Raleigh Superbe, 1978 Raleigh Tourist, 1964 Glider 3 Speed, 1967 Raleigh Sprite 5 Speed, 1968 Hercules AMF 3 Speed, 1972 Raleigh Superbe, 1976 Raleigh Superbe, 1957 Flying Pigeon, 1967 Dunelt 3 Speed

Mentioned: 47 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 549 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 14 Times in 13 Posts
Originally Posted by BigChief View Post
Just a bit of daydreaming here...I was impressed with that black and white Canadian Superbe I mentioned earlier. Very fancy for a roadster. Different, but in a good way. Since this bike has the chrome ended fork, I'd be very tempted to do a total refinish of this bike and copy the black and white one. I might not be able to find a ready made "Superbe" transfer for the seat tube, but I'll bet I could find a font close enough to look good. My local sign shop could make up a nice vinyl transfer. White cable housings, white grips and , of course, a B66. Plus...I've been dying to buy a Beugler pin stripping tool and learn how to use it.
This bike arrived in my backyard in somewhat poor condition. The owner, a friend, had bought it the week before because he wanted the Dynohub front wheel.
As I started to remove the repaint (poorly painted blue with a brush) the original blue paint and decals were revealed.
Although I prefer a black bike I've decided to leave this one as is for the time being. It rides quite nicely although the front forks have a slight twist.
I suspect a result of someone reefing on the front with the lock engaged.
It would appear that these bikes had a two-part finish with a silver undercoat followed by a translucent blue top coat.
Original colour revealed.

As originally received:
gster is offline  
Old 12-23-18, 11:40 AM
  #18905  
clubman
Youngman Grand
 
clubman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Nova Scotia
Posts: 5,487

Bikes: roadsters, club bikes, fixed and classic

Mentioned: 82 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 965 Post(s)
Liked 18 Times in 16 Posts
There were so many variants of these, some with chrome forks, some with white paint, some with neither.

I gave this red one away 3 years ago as it had a bent fork and was too large.

The bottom pristine pair are a dark blue with flashes on the forks. Funny that most of these Superbes were large frames with vinyl Brooks saddles.

Big Chief, if I see another one(cheap), I'll put your name on it.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg
DSC06241.jpg (1.54 MB, 297 views)
File Type: jpg
Superbe-pair.jpg (989.5 KB, 278 views)
clubman is offline  
Old 12-23-18, 03:49 PM
  #18906  
gster
Senior Member
 
gster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Toronto
Posts: 1,634

Bikes: 1971 Hercules, 1978 Raleigh Superbe, 1978 Raleigh Tourist, 1964 Glider 3 Speed, 1967 Raleigh Sprite 5 Speed, 1968 Hercules AMF 3 Speed, 1972 Raleigh Superbe, 1976 Raleigh Superbe, 1957 Flying Pigeon, 1967 Dunelt 3 Speed

Mentioned: 47 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 549 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 14 Times in 13 Posts
Originally Posted by clubman View Post
There were so many variants of these, some with chrome forks, some with white paint, some with neither.

I gave this red one away 3 years ago as it had a bent fork and was too large.

The bottom pristine pair are a dark blue with flashes on the forks. Funny that most of these Superbes were large frames with vinyl Brooks saddles.

Big Chief, if I see another one(cheap), I'll put your name on it.
Dark Blue and white is a nice combo.

Last edited by gster; 12-23-18 at 04:55 PM.
gster is offline  
Old 12-23-18, 04:37 PM
  #18907  
BigChief 
Senior Member
 
BigChief's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Posts: 2,946
Mentioned: 96 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1122 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 12 Times in 10 Posts
Wow, a his and hers pair. Beautiful bikes! I forgot about the stars on the seat tube. Gotta have them too.
__________________
Inflate Hard
BigChief is offline  
Old 12-24-18, 03:50 AM
  #18908  
Johno59
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2016
Location: Cambridge UK
Posts: 325

Bikes: 2x pre-1934 Humbers, 1932 Raleigh Tourist, 1946 Raleigh Lenton, 1947 Grand Prix Raleigh, 1949 Golden Arrow, 1950 Robin Hood, 1956 Claude Butler, 1973 Raleigh Wayfarer, 1984 Holdsworth, 1985 EG Bates Lo-pro Funny TT Bike, 1980 Alan,3 x custom TT bikes

Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 118 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 10 Times in 9 Posts
Originally Posted by gster View Post
Fixies are pure and simple racing bikes. A binary system,
on and off. Pedaling or stopping, nothing in between.
They are not suitable for everyday riding and are
not for novices . They are not forgiving.
They are a fad for the young and reckless, that has, thankfully, mostly passed.
I've said my piece and welcome any
counter arguments.
Long before the latest iteration of hipsters, fixed wheel bikes were used as path racers as they were more efficient in getting power to where rubber meets the road. Before the fax machine much urgent/ legal/ confidential printed documents passing around major cities throughout the world used bike couriers to deliver their documentation in a fast efficient manner. All of these bikes were fixed wheel. Forty years ago when I was doing it the reason we used fixed in heavy traffic was it was safer. Certainly it was the most efficient method of travel but it was the safety bit that was most compelling reason.
On a fixed bike you tend to go fast and the pressure on your legs at all times constantly reminds you of the momentum you have and the consequences if you hit or are hit by the ground, car or pedestrian. You tend to keep up with the traffic and needless to say you are constantly aware the whole flow of moving objects weighing thousands of tons will not tolerate a 25 lb bicycle obstructing the flow. The pressure on your legs tends to remind you of this overwhelming force surrounding you and your primeval survival instincts conditions you to understand the traffic is meanest SOB in the valley and you will die if you tempt fate.
The beauty of it is when the monster is compelled to halt at a red light you are free to zoom up and away and get a shot of dopamine as the monster is forced to pause. On the next block you return to the clutches of the beast and the cycle repeats.
Do this a hundred times a day, week in, week out and any other way feels weird and dangerously disconnected and rightly so.

Last edited by Johno59; 12-24-18 at 04:08 AM.
Johno59 is offline  
Old 12-24-18, 06:22 AM
  #18909  
BigChief 
Senior Member
 
BigChief's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Posts: 2,946
Mentioned: 96 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1122 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 12 Times in 10 Posts
Originally Posted by Johno59 View Post
Long before the latest iteration of hipsters, fixed wheel bikes were used as path racers as they were more efficient in getting power to where rubber meets the road. Before the fax machine much urgent/ legal/ confidential printed documents passing around major cities throughout the world used bike couriers to deliver their documentation in a fast efficient manner. All of these bikes were fixed wheel. Forty years ago when I was doing it the reason we used fixed in heavy traffic was it was safer. Certainly it was the most efficient method of travel but it was the safety bit that was most compelling reason.
On a fixed bike you tend to go fast and the pressure on your legs at all times constantly reminds you of the momentum you have and the consequences if you hit or are hit by the ground, car or pedestrian. You tend to keep up with the traffic and needless to say you are constantly aware the whole flow of moving objects weighing thousands of tons will not tolerate a 25 lb bicycle obstructing the flow. The pressure on your legs tends to remind you of this overwhelming force surrounding you and your primeval survival instincts conditions you to understand the traffic is meanest SOB in the valley and you will die if you tempt fate.
The beauty of it is when the monster is compelled to halt at a red light you are free to zoom up and away and get a shot of dopamine as the monster is forced to pause. On the next block you return to the clutches of the beast and the cycle repeats.
Do this a hundred times a day, week in, week out and any other way feels weird and dangerously disconnected and rightly so.
That's difficult for me to imagine, but I suppose it's similar in a way to my preference to manual transmissions in cars.
__________________
Inflate Hard
BigChief is offline  
Old 12-24-18, 08:59 AM
  #18910  
Ged117
Senior Member
 
Ged117's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2018
Location: Kingston, Ontario
Posts: 150

Bikes: 1950 Raleigh Superbe, 1977 Peugeot AO8, 1990 Schwinn Voyageur

Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 87 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 7 Times in 6 Posts
1950 Raleigh - Sports?

Hello all,
After being bitten by the Raleigh bug as a result of reading nearly all of this most excellent thread, I've bought one of my own. The hub is stamped 50 - 1 so I take that to be January 1950.
It has the AG 3 speed dynohub plus all the fixings and mechanic oil points not to mention a "cyclo" three speed derailleur that I am curious about; somebody here mentioned it once as a '50s option. It also includes the original B66 in good condition. It has sat for the better part of 30+ years and will need many Sunday afternoon work sessions - I can't wait. More photos to follow with better sizing.


Ged117 is offline  
Old 12-24-18, 10:34 AM
  #18911  
Buellster 
Senior Member
 
Buellster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2018
Posts: 718
Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 209 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Very excited to see more pics of this bike! ^
Also hear about what a cyclone hub is.

on an unrelated query, has anyone ever converted a Sprite mixte to a three speed? There is one for a good price nearby and it's a 25"! Which is crazy to me. I've always wanted a mixte and they are NEVER in my size. I thought it could be a good candidate for my hub if all works out with the new shifter.
if not I have a 3 speed I could put in. Would the Sprite take 700c tires?
Buellster is offline  
Old 12-24-18, 10:58 AM
  #18912  
BigChief 
Senior Member
 
BigChief's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Posts: 2,946
Mentioned: 96 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1122 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 12 Times in 10 Posts
This looks like a very interesting bike. The Cyclo wasn't a factory option, but a popular aftermarket accessory of that time. Very cool. From the head tube pic I see that it is a pre 1955 style frame and 23". Both rare and desirable features. I'm looking forward to more pictures too.
__________________
Inflate Hard
BigChief is offline  
Old 12-24-18, 12:21 PM
  #18913  
Johno59
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2016
Location: Cambridge UK
Posts: 325

Bikes: 2x pre-1934 Humbers, 1932 Raleigh Tourist, 1946 Raleigh Lenton, 1947 Grand Prix Raleigh, 1949 Golden Arrow, 1950 Robin Hood, 1956 Claude Butler, 1973 Raleigh Wayfarer, 1984 Holdsworth, 1985 EG Bates Lo-pro Funny TT Bike, 1980 Alan,3 x custom TT bikes

Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 118 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 10 Times in 9 Posts
Originally Posted by BigChief View Post
That's difficult for me to imagine, but I suppose it's similar in a way to my preference to manual transmissions in cars.
Surfing possesses a similar connecivity that gives a similar buzz. You zip along on a few kgs of foam with little effort and a sense of being harnessed to a greater power. All is good if you stay in the groove, step out of the groove and hundreds of tons of water can rearrange your day big time
Johno59 is offline  
Old 12-24-18, 01:37 PM
  #18914  
raleighroadster
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2018
Posts: 99
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 26 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Superbe for $75? Offering $50 on Wednesday!

Superbe for $75? Thinking this would make a good parts bike. The superbe I bought last week had a bent pedal spindle, fortunately on the non chainring side. And I need a seatpost for a brooks saddle I picked up!
While down south visiting family, driving a rental ford expedition with lots of carry capacity, I decided to look at the ads. Found this woman’s superbe for $75. That child carrier is $170 new. Bike has been for sale for a week, will offer $50.



Last edited by raleighroadster; 12-24-18 at 01:51 PM.
raleighroadster is offline  
Old 12-24-18, 09:14 PM
  #18915  
BigChief 
Senior Member
 
BigChief's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Posts: 2,946
Mentioned: 96 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1122 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 12 Times in 10 Posts
Lots of good parts there. A good deal for 50. Looks to be a 72. Good looking 32/40 spoke Raleigh pattern wheels with a front Dyno. Nice. Lamps good for a late 60s early 70s Superbe. Can't see if the fork lamp cable clamps are there. The Brooks looks iffy though. I wouldn't count it. Yuk, auto adjust levers and 46T chainring
__________________
Inflate Hard
BigChief is offline  
Old 12-24-18, 09:47 PM
  #18916  
thumpism 
Bikes are okay, I guess.
 
thumpism's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Location: Richmond, Virginia
Posts: 4,607

Bikes: Waterford Paramount Touring, Bridgestone RB-T, Trek 510 city build, Giant CFM-2, Raleigh Sports 3-speeds in M23 L23 and L19, Schwinn Cimarron oddball build

Mentioned: 36 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1227 Post(s)
Liked 23 Times in 15 Posts
Originally Posted by BigChief View Post
This looks like a very interesting bike. The Cyclo wasn't a factory option, but a popular aftermarket accessory of that time. Very cool. From the head tube pic I see that it is a pre 1955 style frame and 23". Both rare and desirable features. I'm looking forward to more pictures too.
I'll post a pic of my NIB Cyclo Benelux 3-speed (makes a 3 into a 9, and would probably make a 5 into a 15--has anyone done this?) conversion kit.
thumpism is offline  
Old 12-24-18, 10:01 PM
  #18917  
thumpism 
Bikes are okay, I guess.
 
thumpism's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Location: Richmond, Virginia
Posts: 4,607

Bikes: Waterford Paramount Touring, Bridgestone RB-T, Trek 510 city build, Giant CFM-2, Raleigh Sports 3-speeds in M23 L23 and L19, Schwinn Cimarron oddball build

Mentioned: 36 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1227 Post(s)
Liked 23 Times in 15 Posts
Originally Posted by Johno59 View Post
The beauty of it is when the monster is compelled to halt at a red light you are free to zoom up and away and get a shot of dopamine as the monster is forced to pause. On the next block you return to the clutches of the beast and the cycle repeats.
All very eloquently put, and not to judge too harshly but I hope you were stopping at those same lights, at least briefly. If not, you're damned lucky that monster didn't squash your ass.
thumpism is offline  
Old 12-24-18, 10:32 PM
  #18918  
roughrider504
Senior Member
 
roughrider504's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: New Orleans
Posts: 1,240

Bikes: Raleigh Sports, Raleigh DL-1, Raleigh Alyeska, Modern Brifter Raleigh, Schwinn Sprint (curved ST) converted to 3spd, Chrome Schwinn Sierra, Jamis Quest (fixed) and many projects

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 21 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
I picked this up in January and haven't touched it since.. time flies. Pulled a shifter out of the bin and found the brake pads I ordered a while back.


It wasn't very happy going through the gears on the stand. It definitely could have ridden, but not happily. Since it's a Sturmey, the obvious answer is to add oil until it works! Right?


I did wonder why a 1960 hub was on an 80's DL - it was broken. I was almost excited, I've never had a broken AW! I dug through my parts bin like a kid on Christmas. Can't wait to get some tires and put some miles on it.




roughrider504 is offline  
Old 12-25-18, 03:50 AM
  #18919  
Johno59
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2016
Location: Cambridge UK
Posts: 325

Bikes: 2x pre-1934 Humbers, 1932 Raleigh Tourist, 1946 Raleigh Lenton, 1947 Grand Prix Raleigh, 1949 Golden Arrow, 1950 Robin Hood, 1956 Claude Butler, 1973 Raleigh Wayfarer, 1984 Holdsworth, 1985 EG Bates Lo-pro Funny TT Bike, 1980 Alan,3 x custom TT bikes

Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 118 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 10 Times in 9 Posts
Originally Posted by thumpism View Post
All very eloquently put, and not to judge too harshly but I hope you were stopping at those same lights, at least briefly. If not, you're damned lucky that monster didn't squash your ass.
In my experience if you run red lights on a bicycle as a job in a big city you will not survive. Folks do it all the time once or twice each day commuting to work and get away with it. Do it a hundred times in a day for work and I doubt you'd survive a week. City intersections are too big and many frustrated folks drive very aggressively. One thing we used to reflect on back at the bike pool, whilst we awaited for the next job, was the sobering fact that every day you always saw a 'civilian' under a car - usually a well dressed suited and booted city worker. Most likely jay walking or crossing against the lights.
My dopamine shot referred to passing all the stuck vehicles as you zipped passed them up to the next intersection. Hopefully you timed it to go green when you arrived. Do the same route thousands of times and you get to know the timing of the traffic signals. If not, you balanced for a few seconds at the head of the beast and off again from the front.
Johno59 is offline  
Old 12-25-18, 04:44 AM
  #18920  
BigChief 
Senior Member
 
BigChief's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Posts: 2,946
Mentioned: 96 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1122 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 12 Times in 10 Posts
Originally Posted by roughrider504 View Post
I picked this up in January and haven't touched it since.. time flies. Pulled a shifter out of the bin and found the brake pads I ordered a while back.


It wasn't very happy going through the gears on the stand. It definitely could have ridden, but not happily. Since it's a Sturmey, the obvious answer is to add oil until it works! Right?


I did wonder why a 1960 hub was on an 80's DL - it was broken. I was almost excited, I've never had a broken AW! I dug through my parts bin like a kid on Christmas. Can't wait to get some tires and put some miles on it.




I've never run across crunched planet gears before, but there they are. The pins are placed in backwards. I wonder if that could have anything to do with it.
__________________
Inflate Hard
BigChief is offline  
Old 12-25-18, 09:08 AM
  #18921  
gster
Senior Member
 
gster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Toronto
Posts: 1,634

Bikes: 1971 Hercules, 1978 Raleigh Superbe, 1978 Raleigh Tourist, 1964 Glider 3 Speed, 1967 Raleigh Sprite 5 Speed, 1968 Hercules AMF 3 Speed, 1972 Raleigh Superbe, 1976 Raleigh Superbe, 1957 Flying Pigeon, 1967 Dunelt 3 Speed

Mentioned: 47 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 549 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 14 Times in 13 Posts
Christmas Morning

I didn't get a bike for Christmas but I did get a couple of paintings of bikes!
The boy could have been me back in 1967 and the girl....
Marcia Brady?
All the girls back then wanted that straight blonde hair.
They used to iron their hair on an ironing board.
gster is offline  
Old 12-25-18, 09:10 AM
  #18922  
gster
Senior Member
 
gster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Toronto
Posts: 1,634

Bikes: 1971 Hercules, 1978 Raleigh Superbe, 1978 Raleigh Tourist, 1964 Glider 3 Speed, 1967 Raleigh Sprite 5 Speed, 1968 Hercules AMF 3 Speed, 1972 Raleigh Superbe, 1976 Raleigh Superbe, 1957 Flying Pigeon, 1967 Dunelt 3 Speed

Mentioned: 47 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 549 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 14 Times in 13 Posts
Originally Posted by Johno59 View Post
Long before the latest iteration of hipsters, fixed wheel bikes were used as path racers as they were more efficient in getting power to where rubber meets the road. Before the fax machine much urgent/ legal/ confidential printed documents passing around major cities throughout the world used bike couriers to deliver their documentation in a fast efficient manner. All of these bikes were fixed wheel. Forty years ago when I was doing it the reason we used fixed in heavy traffic was it was safer. Certainly it was the most efficient method of travel but it was the safety bit that was most compelling reason.
On a fixed bike you tend to go fast and the pressure on your legs at all times constantly reminds you of the momentum you have and the consequences if you hit or are hit by the ground, car or pedestrian. You tend to keep up with the traffic and needless to say you are constantly aware the whole flow of moving objects weighing thousands of tons will not tolerate a 25 lb bicycle obstructing the flow. The pressure on your legs tends to remind you of this overwhelming force surrounding you and your primeval survival instincts conditions you to understand the traffic is meanest SOB in the valley and you will die if you tempt fate.
The beauty of it is when the monster is compelled to halt at a red light you are free to zoom up and away and get a shot of dopamine as the monster is forced to pause. On the next block you return to the clutches of the beast and the cycle repeats.
Do this a hundred times a day, week in, week out and any other way feels weird and dangerously disconnected and rightly so.
Well written.
I'm glad to have stirred the pot.
gster is offline  
Old 12-25-18, 09:17 AM
  #18923  
gster
Senior Member
 
gster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Toronto
Posts: 1,634

Bikes: 1971 Hercules, 1978 Raleigh Superbe, 1978 Raleigh Tourist, 1964 Glider 3 Speed, 1967 Raleigh Sprite 5 Speed, 1968 Hercules AMF 3 Speed, 1972 Raleigh Superbe, 1976 Raleigh Superbe, 1957 Flying Pigeon, 1967 Dunelt 3 Speed

Mentioned: 47 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 549 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 14 Times in 13 Posts
Originally Posted by roughrider504 View Post
I picked this up in January and haven't touched it since.. time flies. Pulled a shifter out of the bin and found the brake pads I ordered a while back.


It wasn't very happy going through the gears on the stand. It definitely could have ridden, but not happily. Since it's a Sturmey, the obvious answer is to add oil until it works! Right?


I did wonder why a 1960 hub was on an 80's DL - it was broken. I was almost excited, I've never had a broken AW! I dug through my parts bin like a kid on Christmas. Can't wait to get some tires and put some miles on it.




I've never seen those parts fail....
I had a mangled sun gear once that was caused (I believe) from an overtightend hub.
gster is offline  
Old 12-25-18, 09:25 AM
  #18924  
gster
Senior Member
 
gster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Toronto
Posts: 1,634

Bikes: 1971 Hercules, 1978 Raleigh Superbe, 1978 Raleigh Tourist, 1964 Glider 3 Speed, 1967 Raleigh Sprite 5 Speed, 1968 Hercules AMF 3 Speed, 1972 Raleigh Superbe, 1976 Raleigh Superbe, 1957 Flying Pigeon, 1967 Dunelt 3 Speed

Mentioned: 47 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 549 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 14 Times in 13 Posts
My Dad Bought Me a Bike

Back in 1965 or so, my Dad bought me a bike. It was probably a Supercycle bought at the old Canadian Tire on Dundas. It looked something like this one.


Single speed with a coaster brake.

Even at $40.00 (1967 price), using the inflation calculator, it would equal about $320.00 today or close to half a week’s pay….

I liked my bike very much but by 1967 I really wanted one of these.




My dad and I went back to Canadian Tire, not to buy a new bike but to buy the accessories to convert my bike.

He repainted the frame in a nice sparkle finish green, added the ape hanger bars, new sparkle grips, a banana seat, sissy bar and perhaps monkey fenders.

The re styled bike was promptly stolen by some kid at school. We never locked our bikes back then. Somehow my Dad tracked it down and we went to this kid’s house to retrieve it. I’m not sure how my Dad found it or what happened to this bike afterwards, but I obviously out grew it and moved on to a bigger 10 speed.

Thanks Dad.
gster is offline  
Old 12-25-18, 10:44 AM
  #18925  
JohnDThompson 
Old fart
 
JohnDThompson's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Appleton WI
Posts: 20,405

Bikes: Several, mostly not name brands.

Mentioned: 110 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1699 Post(s)
Liked 63 Times in 43 Posts
Originally Posted by gster View Post

I've never seen those parts fail....
I had a mangled sun gear once that was caused (I believe) from an overtightend hub.
They seem to fail more readily on newer hubs (70s and newer), where the planets seem to be made out of pot-metal.
JohnDThompson is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.