Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Classic & Vintage
Reload this Page >

For the love of English 3 speeds...

Classic & Vintage This forum is to discuss the many aspects of classic and vintage bicycles, including musclebikes, lightweights, middleweights, hi-wheelers, bone-shakers, safety bikes and much more.

For the love of English 3 speeds...

Old 02-04-19, 06:03 AM
  #19201  
markk900
Senior Member
 
markk900's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Ontario
Posts: 1,804
Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 140 Post(s)
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Originally Posted by paulb_in_bkln View Post
The bike is safe but the damage is conspicuous and not cover-up-able. I have thought of what you said, but the Trek has been useful to me as a derailleur bike. Plus, ahead of it project-wise is the cotterless cranking and AW-ing a salvaged mid-70s Peugeot mixte that while the finish is awful is straight and undinged. I finally got back my built 700c wheels (CR18s) after a long wait (two years almost!) and unfortunately some harsh words. I have not been able to locate a cotterless spindle that fits the old French BB, so will probably wind up shelling out for the Velo Orange BB, once I figure out the spindle length I need. I am so much better at making plans than at carrying them out.
Still semi on topic - I also have an early 70s Peugeot - which I owned since 1973 and back then converted to cotterless. You can continue to use the cups that are on the bike and I think the spindle is a "SSS" or "3S" (not sure if that's size). Anyway, it was not hard to source a spindle at the LBS - take the cottered one with you and find a cotterless spindle with same basic specs. As to OT - the IGH on 700C wheels was on this bike before the Trek.
markk900 is offline  
Old 02-04-19, 11:32 AM
  #19202  
Salubrious
Senior Member
 
Salubrious's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 1,246
Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 160 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by Chr0m0ly View Post
I'm interested in finding something like these bikes, for utility use, foul weather, errands, pub ride, etc. But from what I can tell they are mostly hi-tension steel, and not butted?
Are there any three (or four or five speeds) with higher end frames? Butted Mangy-molly would be fine, I know these are utility cycles, but something a touch lighter would've nice!

Barring that, I'm conciderering IGH-ifying a nicer frame, and If I go that route what sort of geometry would work best? I have an '84 Trek 520 I think would work well in this role, I would think a mid-level touring frame would be a good choice, am I wrong? Are there better choices?

Thanks!
One thing about that makes these bikes so charming is the ride. That does not come from any one thing; wheel size, tires, frame geometry and materials all play a role. I've played with a lot of high end frames and its a bit of a trick to find one that has the same charm- most are too harsh. If you are planning 700c I would not do anything less than 28mm (33 would be better and likely faster too) and I would run wider rims; both will help with ride quality. The thing about the 650A tire size that most British 3-speeds use is its extremely well adapted to a variety of surfaces (as anyone on the Lake Pepin 3-speed tour can tell you)- not too slow on pavement and relatively sure-footed on gravel (its arguable that the rod-brake machines were the first mountain bikes...). The frame geometries are relaxed where most 531DB frames tend to be designed to be faster handling (although IME three speed geometries handle plenty fast); in their efforts to make lighter frames handle faster, most of what is happened is ride quality suffered unless the frame builder really knew what he was doing.

So while you can make a more high end bike look the part quite often what occurs is a bike that lacks the ride quality- and as a result tends to spend more time in the garage. One frame that might do the trick is the Schwinn Sports Tourer or Super Sport; both have a more relaxed geometry and have a celebrated ride quality, but those frames aren't exactly lightweight They also rode on 27"x 1 1/4" tires.

I have a number of high end bikes, even a custom built frame made of Reynold 953 stainless, but the bike I ride most often is my stupid 1972 Raleigh Superbe- it goes to work, the grocery store, the bank and so on. It has fenders, lights so a ride home at night is no worries, a rack which with a single pannier made it really handy and a locking fork so I usually don't carry a bike lock. I ride it more than any other bike simply because its a great commuter. But I've taken it on the Lake Pepin 3-speed tour and other rides and its totally been up for it. Its not a light bike bit its really ride-able and if the apocalypse came that would probably be my goto.
Salubrious is offline  
Old 02-04-19, 02:02 PM
  #19203  
browngw
Senior Member
 
browngw's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Port Dover Ontario Canada
Posts: 1,209

Bikes: 1958 Sun Cresta, 1965 Dilecta Le Blanc, 1960 Royal Nord, 1971 Robin Hood Sports, 1972 Raleigh Sports, 1976 SuperCycle Excalibur, 1979 Raleigh DL1 , 2014 Salsa Vaya, 2017 Felt DD70, 2016 Giant ATX27.5, 2012 Giant Halfway Folder, and others

Mentioned: 33 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 237 Post(s)
Liked 16 Times in 11 Posts


A fellow bike guy called this morning to see if I was still interested in a bike he has had for 22years or so. It is a Belgium Royal Nord President believed to be circa 1967. I looked at a couple of years ago and took a couple of poor phone shots. At that time he didn't want to part with it, but now has changed his mind. We will have to get to a lower price but I think I want the bike. The green/marble paintjob and the chainguard are fascinating . Now to the English part. Brampton Speedy Switch and hub? Are these similar to the Sturmey Archer?
browngw is offline  
Old 02-04-19, 03:11 PM
  #19204  
Salubrious
Senior Member
 
Salubrious's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 1,246
Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 160 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
^^ Yes. Some of the parts are interchangeable.
Salubrious is offline  
Old 02-04-19, 05:10 PM
  #19205  
sd5782 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2019
Location: Toledo Ohio
Posts: 131

Bikes: 1970s Schwinn SuperSport 1985 Centurion Ironman 1991 Bianchi Boardwalk Hybrid 1964 Huffeigh Sportsman 3 speed, 1960s Frejus Tour de France

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 70 Post(s)
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Tearing into it now

Originally Posted by Slowride79 View Post
Cotter pin press
New Crank Cotter Press

you will also needpark tool hcw-5 for bb lock ring and hcw-11 for cups. Amazon for those. Fixed cups are a bear but you can leave in or get the bikesmith tool for that too.

As mentioned this is really the first thing along with all other bearings that should be cleaned /replaced /repacked with new wheel bearing grease. 9 times out of 10 they've never been serviced . It will transform the bike from a creaking and clunking contraption to smooth running machine!
Well, thanks to you enablers, I am tearing into the 1964 Huffeigh Sportsman now. Got the cotters out with a modified chain breaker, and even got the crank out. Rust and crud inside. Good call I think on disassembly. I want to start with some grease, and in later years oil down the seat tube. After seeing the axle, it would seem that for oil to get to the bearings, one would be advised to put the bike on its side and work pedals, and then the other side. I think I may get the park tool HCW-11 so as not to have to use a punch and hammer again.

Yes, one pedal was quite stiff so that is apart now. Maybe take the steering head bearings out tomorrow. Can the rear hub bearings be serviced without taking the 3-speed mechanism apart? A bit challenging working on a 50+ year old bike, but a good winter project.
sd5782 is online now  
Old 02-04-19, 05:11 PM
  #19206  
clubman
Youngman Grand
 
clubman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Nova Scotia
Posts: 5,480

Bikes: roadsters, club bikes, fixed and classic

Mentioned: 82 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 962 Post(s)
Liked 14 Times in 12 Posts
Originally Posted by browngw View Post
Cool 5 pin crank. Is that ring bolt on or riveted? See if you can find a makers mark on it somewhere.

The chainguard is super 60's cool as well.
clubman is offline  
Old 02-04-19, 09:59 PM
  #19207  
BigChief 
Senior Member
 
BigChief's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Posts: 2,939
Mentioned: 96 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1118 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 12 Times in 10 Posts
Originally Posted by sd5782 View Post
Well, thanks to you enablers, I am tearing into the 1964 Huffeigh Sportsman now. Got the cotters out with a modified chain breaker, and even got the crank out. Rust and crud inside. Good call I think on disassembly. I want to start with some grease, and in later years oil down the seat tube. After seeing the axle, it would seem that for oil to get to the bearings, one would be advised to put the bike on its side and work pedals, and then the other side. I think I may get the park tool HCW-11 so as not to have to use a punch and hammer again.

Yes, one pedal was quite stiff so that is apart now. Maybe take the steering head bearings out tomorrow. Can the rear hub bearings be serviced without taking the 3-speed mechanism apart? A bit challenging working on a 50+ year old bike, but a good winter project.
Glad the cotters came out well. Being able to reuse them saves time and money. You are right about laying the bike on it's side to get oil into the bearings. You are also right about a proper servicing being much better. I never remove the fixed cup for regular servicing. I just reach in there with a chopstick and rag soaked in paint thinner. Grease will hold the new bearings on the spindle as you thread it through again when reassembling. Yes, if the AW hub is working properly, you can get by with squirting a bit of oil into it. Oil tends to spread around inside nicely. Just don't use anything too heavy. Regular motor oil will do, but servicing it isn't hard to do and can be a fun winter evening project. Beats watching TV. Here's a good video of a rebuild.

__________________
Inflate Hard

Last edited by BigChief; 02-04-19 at 10:05 PM.
BigChief is offline  
Old 02-05-19, 07:22 AM
  #19208  
sd5782 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2019
Location: Toledo Ohio
Posts: 131

Bikes: 1970s Schwinn SuperSport 1985 Centurion Ironman 1991 Bianchi Boardwalk Hybrid 1964 Huffeigh Sportsman 3 speed, 1960s Frejus Tour de France

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 70 Post(s)
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Thanks Big chief. On the rear hub, does oil squirted into the hub migrate to the axle bearings? The video doesn't seem to show any greasing of axle bearings. 1964 AW is the hub, and it spins freely and adjustment seems spot on also.. Thanks
Steve
sd5782 is online now  
Old 02-05-19, 10:01 AM
  #19209  
BigChief 
Senior Member
 
BigChief's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Posts: 2,939
Mentioned: 96 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1118 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 12 Times in 10 Posts
Originally Posted by sd5782 View Post
Thanks Big chief. On the rear hub, does oil squirted into the hub migrate to the axle bearings? The video doesn't seem to show any greasing of axle bearings. 1964 AW is the hub, and it spins freely and adjustment seems spot on also.. Thanks
Steve
The oil does seem to migrate everywhere in these hubs and it doesn't take much. Still, it's good to tear down a hub that's been sitting around for 50 years and clean it up. RJ does pack the bearings with marine grease in the video. I use marine grease too. It's claimed it has some sort of additive that fights moisture. I can't say how well it works, but I take them at their word. Moisture is your enemy, hopefully it helps. But, yes, just adding some oil will protect the hub and you could put off a full service without worrying about it. You don't want to run it dry.
__________________
Inflate Hard
BigChief is offline  
Old 02-05-19, 11:52 AM
  #19210  
Salubrious
Senior Member
 
Salubrious's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 1,246
Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 160 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by sd5782 View Post
Can the rear hub bearings be serviced without taking the 3-speed mechanism apart? A bit challenging working on a 50+ year old bike, but a good winter project.
The SA AW hub is a very durable design.

If I have one that is stiff and won't shift, I spray WD40 into the oil port for about 5 seconds. Then I spin the wheel a bit with the cranks and try to shift it- some WD-40 will leak out. If weather permits, I take the bike for a spin around the block and see if the gears start shifting. They usually do. Regardless, I put the bike back on the stand, rotate the oil port down, and flush it out with the WD40. Then I let it drain. I then rotate the wheel so the oil port is up, and install about a tablespoon of automatic transmission fluid (Dextron). Then I take the bike for another spin- this time for about a mile. At this point it should be working quite nicely (if the bearings are not over-tightened). On return home, I put the bike on the stand, rotate the oil port down, and flush it one more time with the WD40. Then I install the regular oil.

The hub bearing should have a tiny bit of play- they should not be snugged down. If you have the hub set up right, it won't leak a whole lot and the wheel will spin as freely as any good quality hub (like Campagnolo).

Last edited by Salubrious; 02-05-19 at 12:00 PM.
Salubrious is offline  
Old 02-05-19, 12:29 PM
  #19211  
sd5782 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2019
Location: Toledo Ohio
Posts: 131

Bikes: 1970s Schwinn SuperSport 1985 Centurion Ironman 1991 Bianchi Boardwalk Hybrid 1964 Huffeigh Sportsman 3 speed, 1960s Frejus Tour de France

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 70 Post(s)
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Shifts and spins fine now

Originally Posted by Salubrious View Post
The SA AW hub is a very durable design.

If I have one that is stiff and won't shift, I spray WD40 into the oil port for about 5 seconds. Then I spin the wheel a bit with the cranks and try to shift it- some WD-40 will leak out. If weather permits, I take the bike for a spin around the block and see if the gears start shifting. They usually do. Regardless, I put the bike back on the stand, rotate the oil port down, and flush it out with the WD40. Then I let it drain. I then rotate the wheel so the oil port is up, and install about a tablespoon of automatic transmission fluid (Dextron). Then I take the bike for another spin- this time for about a mile. At this point it should be working quite nicely (if the bearings are not over-tightened). On return home, I put the bike on the stand, rotate the oil port down, and flush it one more time with the WD40. Then I install the regular oil.

The hub bearing should have a tiny bit of play- they should not be snugged down. If you have the hub set up right, it won't leak a whole lot and the wheel will spin as freely as any good quality hub (like Campagnolo).
It operates just fine now. Bike was purchased last year and I fought shifting a bit until I got rid of the twist grip shifter. I added a liberal amount of oil. Perhaps a dozen rides last year, and it seems fine. Rear hub bearings and shifting seemed fine before winter set in. Perhaps in the warmer future I may tackle the hub. I am just happy now to have done crank bearings. Head bearings, pedals, front wheel, and tires/tubes next. Need brake pads, and the front wheel has a bit of wobble too. Oh what fun.

As an aside, the British seem to like to do things differently.
sd5782 is online now  
Old 02-05-19, 12:55 PM
  #19212  
trainman999
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2016
Posts: 214

Bikes: 83 Schwinn Superior, 86 Paramount,86 Madison,87 Cimeron,86 Nishiki Linear

Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 85 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
What is normal OLD on a SA three speed hub?
trainman999 is offline  
Old 02-05-19, 01:56 PM
  #19213  
nlerner
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 12,090
Mentioned: 244 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1089 Post(s)
Liked 14 Times in 13 Posts
Originally Posted by trainman999 View Post
What is normal OLD on a SA three speed hub?
There were two axle lengths, actually: 5 3/4" and 6 1/4" for 115mm OLD and 120mm OLD. More on that here from Sheldon Brown.
nlerner is offline  
Old 02-05-19, 02:01 PM
  #19214  
BigChief 
Senior Member
 
BigChief's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Posts: 2,939
Mentioned: 96 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1118 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 12 Times in 10 Posts
Originally Posted by nlerner View Post
There were two axle lengths, actually: 5 3/4" and 6 1/4" for 115mm OLD and 120mm OLD. More on that here from Sheldon Brown.
I believe the longer axles were for bikes with wire mudguard stays that were mounted to the axle like the DL-1.
__________________
Inflate Hard
BigChief is offline  
Old 02-05-19, 06:10 PM
  #19215  
paulb_in_bkln
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2018
Location: Brooklyn, NY
Posts: 512

Bikes: 1983 Trek 600, 1972 Raleigh Sports Step Thru, 1963 Rudge Sports, 2007 Dahon MuP8, Dahon Speed, Public Mixte 8-speed IGH, mid-70s Peugeot Mixte AW conversion

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 265 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 1 Post
Originally Posted by Salubrious View Post
The SA AW hub is a very durable design.

If I have one that is stiff and won't shift, I spray WD40 into the oil port for about 5 seconds. Then I spin the wheel a bit with the cranks and try to shift it- some WD-40 will leak out. If weather permits, I take the bike for a spin around the block and see if the gears start shifting. They usually do. Regardless, I put the bike back on the stand, rotate the oil port down, and flush it out with the WD40. Then I let it drain. I then rotate the wheel so the oil port is up, and install about a tablespoon of automatic transmission fluid (Dextron). Then I take the bike for another spin- this time for about a mile. At this point it should be working quite nicely (if the bearings are not over-tightened). On return home, I put the bike on the stand, rotate the oil port down, and flush it one more time with the WD40. Then I install the regular oil.

The hub bearing should have a tiny bit of play- they should not be snugged down. If you have the hub set up right, it won't leak a whole lot and the wheel will spin as freely as any good quality hub (like Campagnolo).
I like the old AW hubs because even though they're clever and somewhat intricate, any moron (me) can rebuild one successfully and once done the hub works like new. I don't know much about rifles but I read somewhere the original Kalashnikov was designed to have very loose tolerances so it would function dependably despite rough treatment and little cleaning. That seems like a pretty good description of the AW hub, whether or not that's what SA intended.

And on the subject, on the way home tonight I found another derelict, rusting three-speed, a blue ladies Sports, tires flat, cables torn away, indicator missing, AND UNLOCKED. I walked away with it. Probably not much is salvageable except the hub, but that's what I want. I locked the bike up in order to collect it tomorrow, so I'm not sure, but it's a later model and I think it's got the 36 spoke rear wheel.
paulb_in_bkln is offline  
Old 02-05-19, 06:16 PM
  #19216  
gster
Senior Member
 
gster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Toronto
Posts: 1,629

Bikes: 1971 Hercules, 1978 Raleigh Superbe, 1978 Raleigh Tourist, 1964 Glider 3 Speed, 1967 Raleigh Sprite 5 Speed, 1968 Hercules AMF 3 Speed, 1972 Raleigh Superbe, 1976 Raleigh Superbe, 1957 Flying Pigeon, 1967 Dunelt 3 Speed

Mentioned: 47 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 549 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 11 Times in 11 Posts
Originally Posted by Salubrious View Post
The SA AW hub is a very durable design.

If I have one that is stiff and won't shift, I spray WD40 into the oil port for about 5 seconds. Then I spin the wheel a bit with the cranks and try to shift it- some WD-40 will leak out. If weather permits, I take the bike for a spin around the block and see if the gears start shifting. They usually do. Regardless, I put the bike back on the stand, rotate the oil port down, and flush it out with the WD40. Then I let it drain. I then rotate the wheel so the oil port is up, and install about a tablespoon of automatic transmission fluid (Dextron). Then I take the bike for another spin- this time for about a mile. At this point it should be working quite nicely (if the bearings are not over-tightened). On return home, I put the bike on the stand, rotate the oil port down, and flush it one more time with the WD40. Then I install the regular oil.

The hub bearing should have a tiny bit of play- they should not be snugged down. If you have the hub set up right, it won't leak a whole lot and the wheel will spin as freely as any good quality hub (like Campagnolo).
Everyone has their own method for flushing out the hubs...
Here's mine:
I place the wheel flat over a big pot with the non drive side race removed.
Then, I slowly pour a quart of solvent (varsol/paint thinner, doesn't matter) down
the hub, rotating the cog/swishing it around etc.
A lot of gunk will drain out.
I then follow up by pouring 2 pots
of boiling water through the hub (more gunk)
More spinning etc.
I let it dry out for a day and the add oil.
re assemble/ re install and ride using all the gears to
give all the parts a good oil film.
Rarely does a hub have an internal problem.
Also, while the wheel is off it gets a good cleaning with
a toothbrush and solvent.
gster is offline  
Old 02-05-19, 06:16 PM
  #19217  
paulb_in_bkln
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2018
Location: Brooklyn, NY
Posts: 512

Bikes: 1983 Trek 600, 1972 Raleigh Sports Step Thru, 1963 Rudge Sports, 2007 Dahon MuP8, Dahon Speed, Public Mixte 8-speed IGH, mid-70s Peugeot Mixte AW conversion

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 265 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 1 Post
Originally Posted by gster View Post
I've using these tires on my bikes and I quite like them.
Good price @ $18.00/tire
Nice tread pattern
Good ride
No flats (yet)
All black w/small logo
The REAL problem these days is inner tubes that slowly (sometimes quickly) leak air.
I've got original Dunlop tubes from the 50's that are tighter than the new ones.
My "getting away with something" ended this morning when the front Kenda went flat on the way to work. Shoulda kept my mouth shut.
paulb_in_bkln is offline  
Old 02-05-19, 06:20 PM
  #19218  
gster
Senior Member
 
gster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Toronto
Posts: 1,629

Bikes: 1971 Hercules, 1978 Raleigh Superbe, 1978 Raleigh Tourist, 1964 Glider 3 Speed, 1967 Raleigh Sprite 5 Speed, 1968 Hercules AMF 3 Speed, 1972 Raleigh Superbe, 1976 Raleigh Superbe, 1957 Flying Pigeon, 1967 Dunelt 3 Speed

Mentioned: 47 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 549 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 11 Times in 11 Posts
Originally Posted by paulb_in_bkln View Post
My "getting away with something" ended this morning when the front Kenda went flat on the way to work. Shoulda kept my mouth shut.
I was in New York City last w/e.
I'm not sure I could ride a bike there.....
and I live in Toronto (also a busy city)
gster is offline  
Old 02-05-19, 07:06 PM
  #19219  
BigChief 
Senior Member
 
BigChief's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Posts: 2,939
Mentioned: 96 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1118 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 12 Times in 10 Posts
Originally Posted by paulb_in_bkln View Post
My "getting away with something" ended this morning when the front Kenda went flat on the way to work. Shoulda kept my mouth shut.
I see that Continental City Rides have come down to 20 dollars in some places now. At that price, I think I'll spring for a pair. I've had the Tour Rides on my DL-1 for over a year now. Very pleased with them.
__________________
Inflate Hard
BigChief is offline  
Old 02-05-19, 08:12 PM
  #19220  
paulb_in_bkln
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2018
Location: Brooklyn, NY
Posts: 512

Bikes: 1983 Trek 600, 1972 Raleigh Sports Step Thru, 1963 Rudge Sports, 2007 Dahon MuP8, Dahon Speed, Public Mixte 8-speed IGH, mid-70s Peugeot Mixte AW conversion

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 265 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 1 Post
Originally Posted by BigChief View Post
I see that Continental City Rides have come down to 20 dollars in some places now. At that price, I think I'll spring for a pair. I've had the Tour Rides on my DL-1 for over a year now. Very pleased with them.
Good tip, Big Chief. Thanks.
paulb_in_bkln is offline  
Old 02-05-19, 08:12 PM
  #19221  
paulb_in_bkln
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2018
Location: Brooklyn, NY
Posts: 512

Bikes: 1983 Trek 600, 1972 Raleigh Sports Step Thru, 1963 Rudge Sports, 2007 Dahon MuP8, Dahon Speed, Public Mixte 8-speed IGH, mid-70s Peugeot Mixte AW conversion

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 265 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 1 Post
I just measured the chainline on an old AW hub at 39 mm. Does this sound right?
paulb_in_bkln is offline  
Old 02-06-19, 11:11 AM
  #19222  
paulb_in_bkln
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2018
Location: Brooklyn, NY
Posts: 512

Bikes: 1983 Trek 600, 1972 Raleigh Sports Step Thru, 1963 Rudge Sports, 2007 Dahon MuP8, Dahon Speed, Public Mixte 8-speed IGH, mid-70s Peugeot Mixte AW conversion

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 265 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 1 Post
To recap, riding homeward from work yesterday what did I spy but yet another abandoned, rusty ladies' Sports. Verily these things get no respect. But wait! This one is... it can't be... can it? It's unlocked! I looked around to see if I was on Candid Camera. But no sign of The Man. Although I was riding my foldcycle, a fortunate coincidence had me carrying my U-lock. I rolled the Raleigh a few blocks before giving up the idea of getting two bikes on the subway at rush hour. So I locked it up and fetched it this morning. I was just planning on getting another hub to rebuild but after an inspection, pumping the tires, and a liberal spritz with Blaster spray, I think this entire bike might be recoverable. Crazy.
paulb_in_bkln is offline  
Old 02-06-19, 01:13 PM
  #19223  
Ged117
Senior Member
 
Ged117's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2018
Location: Kingston, Ontario
Posts: 147

Bikes: 1950 Raleigh Superbe, 1977 Peugeot AO8, 1990 Schwinn Voyageur

Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 86 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 6 Times in 5 Posts
Originally Posted by paulb_in_bkln View Post
To recap, riding homeward from work yesterday what did I spy but yet another abandoned, rusty ladies' Sports. Verily these things get no respect. But wait! This one is... it can't be... can it? It's unlocked! I looked around to see if I was on Candid Camera. But no sign of The Man. Although I was riding my foldcycle, a fortunate coincidence had me carrying my U-lock. I rolled the Raleigh a few blocks before giving up the idea of getting two bikes on the subway at rush hour. So I locked it up and fetched it this morning. I was just planning on getting another hub to rebuild but after an inspection, pumping the tires, and a liberal spritz with Blaster spray, I think this entire bike might be recoverable. Crazy.

Old Raleighs have started finding me too like the needy animals in Dr. Doolittle. There is an early '70s coffee brown 21" model tied to a bike post downtown looking very abandoned, but it is too public a spot to ahem...liberate it.

There is another in the student district chained to a fence having been left to rot some time ago judging by its condition. It is a late '60s green model, 23". I want the 23" for the fun of it, but I lack storage space. It is a shame to see these old fellows rusting. An acquaintance may have a line on an early '50s Raleigh bought new by his father, so I'm holding out for that as a parts source for my own 1950 Raleigh.
Ged117 is offline  
Old 02-06-19, 02:37 PM
  #19224  
paulb_in_bkln
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2018
Location: Brooklyn, NY
Posts: 512

Bikes: 1983 Trek 600, 1972 Raleigh Sports Step Thru, 1963 Rudge Sports, 2007 Dahon MuP8, Dahon Speed, Public Mixte 8-speed IGH, mid-70s Peugeot Mixte AW conversion

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 265 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 1 Post
Originally Posted by Ged117 View Post
It is a late '60s green model, 23".
Crazy. I've got a line on one of those too, also derelict, but the frame is locked at Bkln's commuter rail terminal and security cameras and 24/7 police presence. I'd settle for the rear wheel, but even that could get me in trouble. Today the police ticketed a rider for not wearing a helmet and, wait for it.... There's nothing on the books here about it being illegal to ride without a helmet.
paulb_in_bkln is offline  
Old 02-06-19, 11:36 PM
  #19225  
Buellster 
Senior Member
 
Buellster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2018
Posts: 718
Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 209 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
The flying goat has been lots of fun so far. It's been my primary commuter for a few weeks. I am loving the 4 speed. I am a little worried about one thing though. Gears 2-4 are grand but in gear 1, which I can miraculously stay in now, it feels... rough. I'm not sure how else to describe it. It's not very rough, it just feels... less smooth. That is in comparison to the beautiful butter and velvet quality of gears 2-4 gear 1 feels more like an average cassete.
is this normal?
Buellster is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

Copyright 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.