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For the love of English 3 speeds...

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For the love of English 3 speeds...

Old 03-10-19, 05:23 AM
  #19501  
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Other threads here have discussed how good Everust is at removing rust with a soak. Can this help with the small parts you mention?
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Old 03-10-19, 06:41 AM
  #19502  
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Originally Posted by BigChief View Post
I've never raced anything, but I'm still into motorcycles. Old Brits of course. I still have one left

I've always wanted a Norton, still do! Last motorcycle I had, however, was a 1981 Suzuki GS650G, with disc brakes and shaft drive.
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Old 03-10-19, 09:38 AM
  #19503  
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Originally Posted by Road Fan View Post
Other threads here have discussed how good Everust is at removing rust with a soak. Can this help with the small parts you mention?
I've been using Evapo-Rust for small parts. It's much faster than vinegar, but not as nasty as working with OA. Works great on lightly rusted chrome. If you keep it waxed, the chrome will look great for years. Small exterior parts with that dull gray finish are more of a problem because the rust totally destroys the protective finish and will rust again quickly.
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Old 03-10-19, 10:11 AM
  #19504  
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Originally Posted by Road Fan View Post
I've always wanted a Norton, still do! Last motorcycle I had, however, was a 1981 Suzuki GS650G, with disc brakes and shaft drive.
Nortons are back. Crazy expensive though. I checked out the new Bonneville. They did a great job with the styling, but the thing is huge and HEAVY. Big radiator hanging on the front. 1200cc. All kinds of silly gagets, but at least it doesn't look like the Bat Cycle with a rear tire that looks like it came off a garbage truck. Keep in mind, this is coming from a guy that rides around on 3 speed bicycles. But now, there is a new bike on the market that I'm actually excited about. For years they have been making Royal Enfield bikes in India. Pretty much the old single cylinder Comet. Nice bike, but I need a bit more swat than a Comet. So they are a well established manufacturer with experience. They just introduced their new Interceptor. Beautiful bike! A classic 650cc air cooled vertical twin roadster. Simple, clean design, rather lightweight. I'm going to find a dealer and give it a try.
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Old 03-11-19, 04:09 AM
  #19505  
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Originally Posted by thumpism View Post
Those of the hard core keep it edgy; motorcycle front brake on the right, bicycle front brake on the left.
My rod-braked '54 BSA has the front brake on the right. I prefer this too, so I have that setup on my other bicycles as well.
No need to think twice when riding the motorbike...

Peter
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Old 03-11-19, 07:07 AM
  #19506  
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Originally Posted by oldveloman View Post
My rod-braked '54 BSA has the front brake on the right. I prefer this too, so I have that setup on my other bicycles as well.
No need to think twice when riding the motorbike...

Peter
I used modern Tektro brake calipers on my Rudge scorcher. Those have the cable connections on the right side, so I have the cables routed right/rear to keep the neater looking cross out front.
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Old 03-11-19, 06:42 PM
  #19507  
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This is what you need to resolve the dilemma. Just get two of these, one for the right side and one for the left and run both brakes from each. Ta da!!!

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Old 03-11-19, 07:39 PM
  #19508  
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Originally Posted by thumpism View Post
This is what you need to resolve the dilemma. Just get two of these, one for the right side and one for the left and run both brakes from each. Ta da!!!

It is cool those exist for riders who have the use of one arm. And possibly for a tandem fitted with rim and hub brake at rear?
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Old 03-11-19, 07:45 PM
  #19509  
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That one is at the co-op and I did not buy it. Yet.
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Old 03-12-19, 09:10 AM
  #19510  
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Originally Posted by BigChief View Post
If you only need the later style pinch bolt calipers and clips for the earlier style 2 point chainguard, it might be more economical to buy parts on eBay rather than a whole parts bike. Most any parts bike worth salvaging parts from will cost at least 75 dollars and at that, it would have to be an older one that has the 2 point chainguard. Took a quick look at eBay...here's some pinch bolt calipers.
https://www.ebay.com/itm/Vintage-Ral...frcectupt=true
Thanks for the link and info. The issue with eBay is shipping costs to Canada. That comes out to $60 USD, which is even more in CAD. A forum member has generously offered to help me find the needed parts in a bigger city, so I'd just like to remark again on just how positive this thread experience (and the C&V forum generally) has been for myself and others I think too.
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Old 03-12-19, 10:06 PM
  #19511  
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Removing Raleigh Lock Cylinder?

While I'm waiting for better weather to finish my paint touch-up on my '52 Raleigh, I've been trying to get the lock cylinder out of my fork to find the key code. (It's not on the face of the lock the way it is in some photos, so I assume it is on the body of the cylinder.

I can't get the plug out opposite the lock, even by heating the fork in the oven and putting ice in the plug, but I was, with great patience and a series of improvised tools, able to remove the screw from the back of the lock by working through the bottom of the fork and the holes for the brake bolt.

So now that screw is out.

I also found it very easy to pick the lock, and I was able to raise the pin. (I had a moment of panic when it locked in the upright position, but I was able to pick it again, and I now have it in the middle position, ready to lower all the way if I have to give up.)

But, I can't get the lock cylinder to come out, and I can't find any instructions. There's a thread about removing the lock from a Rudge that mentions turning the pin to remove it, but the pin doesn't seem to want to turn. I know better than to try to force anything when I don't have a clear set of instructions.

Does anyone know where I should go from here to get the lock barrel out and find the key number?
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Old 03-13-19, 04:04 PM
  #19512  
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Originally Posted by carfreefamily View Post
Removing Raleigh Lock Cylinder?

While I'm waiting for better weather to finish my paint touch-up on my '52 Raleigh, I've been trying to get the lock cylinder out of my fork to find the key code. (It's not on the face of the lock the way it is in some photos, so I assume it is on the body of the cylinder.

I can't get the plug out opposite the lock, even by heating the fork in the oven and putting ice in the plug, but I was, with great patience and a series of improvised tools, able to remove the screw from the back of the lock by working through the bottom of the fork and the holes for the brake bolt.

So now that screw is out.

I also found it very easy to pick the lock, and I was able to raise the pin. (I had a moment of panic when it locked in the upright position, but I was able to pick it again, and I now have it in the middle position, ready to lower all the way if I have to give up.)

But, I can't get the lock cylinder to come out, and I can't find any instructions. There's a thread about removing the lock from a Rudge that mentions turning the pin to remove it, but the pin doesn't seem to want to turn. I know better than to try to force anything when I don't have a clear set of instructions.

Does anyone know where I should go from here to get the lock barrel out and find the key number?
Here is a link to an image that might help... http://oldroads.com/mn0.jpg
From memory when I removed the lock from my DL-1 fork, once I removed the retaining screw, the barrel was just friction fitted into the crown. I'm fairly sure I remember prying it out gently with a screwdriver. I used some online instructions, I'll see if I've still got them when I get home from work
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Old 03-13-19, 07:30 PM
  #19513  
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Originally Posted by arty dave View Post
Here is a link to an image that might help... http://oldroads.com/mn0.jpg
From memory when I removed the lock from my DL-1 fork, once I removed the retaining screw, the barrel was just friction fitted into the crown. I'm fairly sure I remember prying it out gently with a screwdriver. I used some online instructions, I'll see if I've still got them when I get home from work
Thanks! I'm being careful to be careful.
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Old 03-13-19, 08:29 PM
  #19514  
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Take a look at post #23 in this thread. From what I understand, a standard Ilco BN1 K1122D blank will work. Without a number on the lock, I suppose you stuck finding a locksmith to ink and file the blank by hand. I know this can be done as long as you have the right blank.
Have Raleigh Suberbe with fork lock -key?
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Old 03-13-19, 09:41 PM
  #19515  
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Originally Posted by BigChief View Post
...I suppose you stuck finding a locksmith to ink and file the blank by hand. I know this can be done as long as you have the right blank.
I've seen it done. Impressive.
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Old 03-14-19, 12:34 AM
  #19516  
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Originally Posted by carfreefamily View Post
Thanks! I'm being careful to be careful.
Well that's frustrating - I couldn't find the info at home but it was something I'd found googling around diligently. It wasn't hard to do but I hope someone else replies with something fresher than my memory... I do remember very clearly soaking the barrel in rust remover and everything getting quite foamy and then realizing that the barrel is made of a cast zinc alloy...so don't do that.
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Old 03-14-19, 08:02 AM
  #19517  
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Originally Posted by BigChief View Post
Take a look at post #23 in this thread. From what I understand, a standard Ilco BN1 K1122D blank will work. Without a number on the lock, I suppose you stuck finding a locksmith to ink and file the blank by hand. I know this can be done as long as you have the right blank.
Have Raleigh Suberbe with fork lock -key?
I ordered a few blank keys yesterday, with the idea that I could give a shot at impressioning a key myself. I saw the Ilco TM-10 referenced on another thread here. It looks like all it takes is a good eye, a file, and patience.
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Old 03-14-19, 11:16 AM
  #19518  
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Originally Posted by carfreefamily View Post
I ordered a few blank keys yesterday, with the idea that I could give a shot at impressioning a key myself. I saw the Ilco TM-10 referenced on another thread here. It looks like all it takes is a good eye, a file, and patience.
I clearly remember my father doing this. He had a small file. This one had teeth on the sides as well as the broad surface, so it could cut a V shape. This was a tool and die shop so we had a can of ink we used to lay out shapes on steel. I suppose any ink would do. He would paint the ink on the blank, wiggle it in the lock and file away the spots where the ink was scratched off. I don't think it was 20 minutes before he had a working key. But, he was the kind of guy who could make anything out of metal.
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Old 03-14-19, 12:19 PM
  #19519  
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Originally Posted by carfreefamily View Post
Does anyone know where I should go from here to get the lock barrel out and find the key number?
Not sure about cylinder removal, but the key number should be stamped on the lock cylinder, e.g. this one uses key number NGN-40:

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Old 03-14-19, 12:26 PM
  #19520  
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Originally Posted by thumpism View Post
This is what you need to resolve the dilemma. Just get two of these, one for the right side and one for the left and run both brakes from each. Ta da!!!

Looks like your hand would have to be twice as strong to use these. Wonder how good is modulation.
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Old 03-14-19, 12:50 PM
  #19521  
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Originally Posted by JohnDThompson View Post
Not sure about cylinder removal, but the key number should be stamped on the lock cylinder, e.g. this one uses key number NGN-40:

If only it were that easy. The face of my lock cylinder is completely blank, not even the suggestion of a number. I'm assuming that maybe older bikes, mine is a '52, might not have had the number stamped on the face like that, but then, I feel like I've seen some photos where they are. I am going off the assumption that I will find the number stamped on the cylinder somewhere hidden, if I am ever able to remove it.
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Old 03-15-19, 05:20 AM
  #19522  
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Originally Posted by BigChief View Post
Just for future reference, I'll describe my plan B for this situation. So far, I've never had to go beyond this to be successful, but who knows? I may someday need a plan C but I haven't yet. If I see the threaded end of the cotter start to bend from pressure from the press, I file a small flat on top. Then I center punch the pin by eye. Then, starting with a small drill and working up in size as I go, I drill down into the threaded end of the cotter. The last drill I use is almost the size of the clearance hole around the cotter. I drill down until I'm well below the edge of the crank arm. Now, the drill leaves a nice countersink perfectly in line with the cotter. Then I find the biggest punch I have that fits neatly into the countersink. Then I lower the bike stand until the wheels are on the ground. Then I drill a hole in the end of a 2x4 big enough to clear the cotter. Then I fit the 2x4 so it fits snugly between the cement floor and the crank arm. Since the spindle and crank arm is being supported by the cement floor and the 2x4 and the force of the hammer blows is being directed exactly where it's needed, I have a lot more power on hand then I did with the press pushing against the threaded end.
I got my stuck cotter out last night. Since we talked I driilled it out as far as I could (from the round end) without damaging the crank arm with the drill. I ran a 1/4" all the way through and made a little more progress with a 5/16". After that it was hand-reamer and files. Round mill-bastard was ok. What was really good and seemed to cut faster were files sold for sharpening chain-saw teeth. For $20 I got one of each size. Finally I focus on cutting back the remaining cotter-wall opposite to the spindle slot. When it became thin enough (the remaining cotter material sticking out of the crank arm was paper-thin) I put the non-drive arm back on with the original cotter and pressed it on decently. Then I put the frame on the ground on some wood blocks and stood on both crank arms, and was rewarded by some loosening. Turned the crank over and repeated. When there was about 30 degrees of misalignment I could just pull out the bent and twisted cotter shell with a narrow pliers. Success!

Next: Remove the spindle, bearings and cups, soak and inspect, and clean the BB shell, also headset, frame cleaning and assessment, hub bearings, rim assessment, SKS Blumels fenders. I need to multi-task the work on this frame in parallel, otherwise it'll be three years before I can ride it!

I'd like to use a TA spindle with the original Raleigh cups and install my old TA Pro Vis crankset with a 48 tooth sprocket, but that's probably part of the hot-rodding phase, along with replacing the rims with aluminum. I don't think I want to re-tap the BB shell but I would be willing to cut down the BB shell ends to 68 mm, if it's necessary to make the BB bearings line up correctly.

I haven't seriously dealt with handling the finish. The frame certainly needs a good wash and some Evaporust treatments, but I don't know if I'm going to repaint. The original "livery" is mostly intact, with some nice white trim-lining over the original deep blue. A friend washed her mom's 1954 Schwinn three-speed, and some of the painted white vintage trim (wings painted on the DT) came off on the sponge!

The bike came to me with a carefully installed original Pletscher kickstand which is still intact, but I think I would put on a Sanyo BB dyno. Lights undecided. I have an FG hub (four-speed with dyno), but it's not ready.
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Old 03-15-19, 08:02 AM
  #19523  
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Originally Posted by carfreefamily View Post
If only it were that easy. The face of my lock cylinder is completely blank, not even the suggestion of a number. I'm assuming that maybe older bikes, mine is a '52, might not have had the number stamped on the face like that, but then, I feel like I've seen some photos where they are. I am going off the assumption that I will find the number stamped on the cylinder somewhere hidden, if I am ever able to remove it.
Interesting. I wonder if yours might have an aftermarket cylinder.

It appears the stock cylinder is held in place by a bolt on the back of the cylinder. You may be able to access it by removing the thimble on the opposite side of the crown:

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Old 03-15-19, 08:11 AM
  #19524  
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Originally Posted by Road Fan View Post
I'd like to use a TA spindle with the original Raleigh cups and install my old TA Pro Vis crankset with a 48 tooth sprocket, but that's probably part of the hot-rodding phase, along with replacing the rims with aluminum.
I used a 122mm Stronglight spindle on my daughter's Sports:



I don't think I want to re-tap the BB shell but I would be willing to cut down the BB shell ends to 68 mm, if it's necessary to make the BB bearings line up correctly.
There are threadless cartridges that may work without the bother of re-tapping or narrowing the shell. And Phil Wood has 1-3/8" x 26tpi mounting rings for their cartridges, and which also fit some non-Phil cartridges. I've used them with SunTour and Edco cartridges; if the cartridge doesn't have a permanently attached drive-side cup, there's a chance it will work with the Phil mounting rings.
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Old 03-15-19, 08:15 AM
  #19525  
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Originally Posted by JohnDThompson View Post
Interesting. I wonder if yours might have an aftermarket cylinder.

It appears the stock cylinder is held in place by a bolt on the back of the cylinder. You may be able to access it by removing the thimble on the opposite side of the crown:
Of the couple of dozen fork locks I've had pass through my hands, maybe 30% had codes marked. The one I took apart didn't have the code either so OP, maybe letting sleeping dogs lie is best. The locks are ineffectual anyway, the lightest of cable locks would serve you better.

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