Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Classic & Vintage
Reload this Page >

For the love of English 3 speeds...

Notices
Classic & Vintage This forum is to discuss the many aspects of classic and vintage bicycles, including musclebikes, lightweights, middleweights, hi-wheelers, bone-shakers, safety bikes and much more.

For the love of English 3 speeds...

Old 04-26-19, 08:56 PM
  #20126  
Senior Member
 
gster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Toronto
Posts: 2,572

Bikes: 1971 Hercules, 1978 Raleigh Superbe, 1978 Raleigh Tourist, 1964 Glider 3 Speed, 1967 Raleigh Sprite 5 Speed, 1968 Hercules AMF 3 Speed, 1972 Raleigh Superbe, 1976 Raleigh Superbe, 1957 Flying Pigeon, 1967 Dunelt 3 Speed

Mentioned: 57 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1030 Post(s)
Liked 445 Times in 288 Posts
Originally Posted by clubman
I've got a Kay chainwheel. Will try to find.
There's someone on the CCM forum quite interested in Kay bikes.
https://www.vintageccm.com/content/s...cycles-toronto

https://vintageccm.com/content/thoma...-alexander-kay

Last edited by gster; 04-27-19 at 05:53 AM.
gster is offline  
Old 04-27-19, 05:30 AM
  #20127  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2018
Location: Brooklyn, NY
Posts: 660

Bikes: 1983 Trek 600, 1972 Raleigh Sports Step Thru, 1963 Rudge Sports, 2007 Dahon MuP8, Dahon Speed, Public Mixte 8-speed IGH, mid-70s Peugeot Mixte AW conversion, Riv Platypus

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 350 Post(s)
Liked 24 Times in 17 Posts
Originally Posted by agmetal
Dunno, but apparently the bike's current owner bought it from someone else, with the 650B conversion having already been done. I've considered a similar build before, partly for the ability to make one of these bikes more useful in the winter, since studded tires actually exist in that size.
I also was thinking it could be the wider selection of tires in 650b. (I have endless admiration for Grant Petersen but so wish he'd adopted 650a, not b.)
paulb_in_bkln is offline  
Old 04-27-19, 06:08 AM
  #20128  
Senior Member
 
gster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Toronto
Posts: 2,572

Bikes: 1971 Hercules, 1978 Raleigh Superbe, 1978 Raleigh Tourist, 1964 Glider 3 Speed, 1967 Raleigh Sprite 5 Speed, 1968 Hercules AMF 3 Speed, 1972 Raleigh Superbe, 1976 Raleigh Superbe, 1957 Flying Pigeon, 1967 Dunelt 3 Speed

Mentioned: 57 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1030 Post(s)
Liked 445 Times in 288 Posts


https://ephemeralnewyork.wordpress.c...he-1890s-city/

Last edited by gster; 04-27-19 at 06:11 AM.
gster is offline  
Old 04-27-19, 07:13 AM
  #20129  
Senior Member
 
gster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Toronto
Posts: 2,572

Bikes: 1971 Hercules, 1978 Raleigh Superbe, 1978 Raleigh Tourist, 1964 Glider 3 Speed, 1967 Raleigh Sprite 5 Speed, 1968 Hercules AMF 3 Speed, 1972 Raleigh Superbe, 1976 Raleigh Superbe, 1957 Flying Pigeon, 1967 Dunelt 3 Speed

Mentioned: 57 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1030 Post(s)
Liked 445 Times in 288 Posts
Central Park NYC (OT)
Central Park, despite being man made, is a good example of
the original topography of Manhattan Island.
When the original street grid was laid out,(1811, north of Houston) land owners were
obliged to either raise or lower their properties to grade.
Here's a great photo of Hell's Kitchen showing a property that
had not yet been graded.
gster is offline  
Old 04-27-19, 10:44 AM
  #20130  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2018
Location: Brooklyn, NY
Posts: 660

Bikes: 1983 Trek 600, 1972 Raleigh Sports Step Thru, 1963 Rudge Sports, 2007 Dahon MuP8, Dahon Speed, Public Mixte 8-speed IGH, mid-70s Peugeot Mixte AW conversion, Riv Platypus

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 350 Post(s)
Liked 24 Times in 17 Posts
Originally Posted by gster
Central Park NYC (OT)
Central Park, despite being man made, is a good example of
the original topography of Manhattan Island.
When the original street grid was laid out,(1811, north of Houston) land owners were
obliged to either raise or lower their properties to grade.
Here's a great photo of Hell's Kitchen showing a property that
had not yet been graded.
Good old photo. It's a natural thing to wonder how the island got so uniformly flat.
paulb_in_bkln is offline  
Old 04-27-19, 05:31 PM
  #20131  
Senior Member
 
ascherer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Manhattan & Woodstock NY
Posts: 2,781

Bikes: 1987 Mercian Pro, 1985 Shogun 500, early '70s Falcon San Remo, 1972 Peugeot PX-10, 1972 Schwinn Paramount P13-9, 1971 Raleigh International, 1971 Peugeot PX-10, 1970 Raleigh Professional Mk1

Mentioned: 114 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 948 Post(s)
Liked 3,043 Times in 1,001 Posts
Originally Posted by gster
Central Park NYC (OT)
Central Park, despite being man made, is a good example of
the original topography of Manhattan Island.
When the original street grid was laid out,(1811, north of Houston) land owners were
obliged to either raise or lower their properties to grade.
Here's a great photo of Hell's Kitchen showing a property that
had not yet been graded.
What a cool photo! Most of Central Park's current topography was created when it was built. From the Central Park site: "The building of Central Park was one of nineteenth-century New York's most massive public works projects. Some 20,000 workers--Yankee engineers, Irish laborers, German gardeners, and native-born stonecutters--reshaped the site's topography to create the pastoral landscape. After blasting out rocky ridges with more gunpowder than was later fired at the Battle of Gettysburg, workers moved nearly 3 million cubic yards of soil and planted more than 270,000 trees and shrubs."

I've read that Olmstead and Vaux designed the park to take advantage of some of the topography. Much of it is slightly below street level so as to block seeing the busy streets from the park sight lines. My apartment faces one of the highest points in the Park, known as The Great Hill, a 4-story high rocky outcrop topped by a beautiful spot called the Children's Glade. During the spring and summer we can't see the rocks.



Manhattan has been completely recreated almost from the beginning of colonization. save for the northwest tip at Inwood Hill Park "...a living piece of old New York. Evidence of its prehistoric roots exists as dramatic caves, valleys, and ridges left as the result of shifting glaciers. Evidence of its uninhabited state afterward remains as its forest and salt marsh (the last natural one in Manhattan), and evidence of its use by Native Americans in the 17th century continues to be discovered. Much has occurred on the land that now composes Inwood Hill Park since the arrival of European colonists in the 17th and 18th centuries, but luckily, most of the park was largely untouched by the wars and development that took place."

And they are both great places to ride English 3-speed bikes!
__________________
1987 Mercian Pro, 1985 Shogun 500, 197? Falcon San Remo, 1972 Peugeot PX-10, 1972 Schwinn Paramount P13-9, 1971 Peugeot PX-10, 1971 Raleigh International, 1970 Raleigh Professional Mark I
Curator/Team Mechanic: 2016 Dawes Streetfighter, 1984 Lotus Eclair, 1975 Motobecane Jubile Mixte, 1974 Raleigh Sports, 1973 Free Spirit Ted Williams, 1972 Raleigh Super Course, 1971 Philips Sport





ascherer is offline  
Old 04-27-19, 08:01 PM
  #20132  
Senior Member
 
gster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Toronto
Posts: 2,572

Bikes: 1971 Hercules, 1978 Raleigh Superbe, 1978 Raleigh Tourist, 1964 Glider 3 Speed, 1967 Raleigh Sprite 5 Speed, 1968 Hercules AMF 3 Speed, 1972 Raleigh Superbe, 1976 Raleigh Superbe, 1957 Flying Pigeon, 1967 Dunelt 3 Speed

Mentioned: 57 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1030 Post(s)
Liked 445 Times in 288 Posts
Originally Posted by ascherer
What a cool photo! Most of Central Park's current topography was created when it was built. From the Central Park site: "The building of Central Park was one of nineteenth-century New York's most massive public works projects. Some 20,000 workers--Yankee engineers, Irish laborers, German gardeners, and native-born stonecutters--reshaped the site's topography to create the pastoral landscape. After blasting out rocky ridges with more gunpowder than was later fired at the Battle of Gettysburg, workers moved nearly 3 million cubic yards of soil and planted more than 270,000 trees and shrubs."

I've read that Olmstead and Vaux designed the park to take advantage of some of the topography. Much of it is slightly below street level so as to block seeing the busy streets from the park sight lines. My apartment faces one of the highest points in the Park, known as The Great Hill, a 4-story high rocky outcrop topped by a beautiful spot called the Children's Glade. During the spring and summer we can't see the rocks.



Manhattan has been completely recreated almost from the beginning of colonization. save for the northwest tip at Inwood Hill Park "...a living piece of old New York. Evidence of its prehistoric roots exists as dramatic caves, valleys, and ridges left as the result of shifting glaciers. Evidence of its uninhabited state afterward remains as its forest and salt marsh (the last natural one in Manhattan), and evidence of its use by Native Americans in the 17th century continues to be discovered. Much has occurred on the land that now composes Inwood Hill Park since the arrival of European colonists in the 17th and 18th centuries, but luckily, most of the park was largely untouched by the wars and development that took place."

And they are both great places to ride English 3-speed bikes!
Good history.
My first time in NYC was 1970 with my Mother (Midnight Cowboy, Taxi driver..).
As an adult, my wife and I visit at least once a year and search out some of our favourite
places (Fanelli's etc)
and to look for some new ones.
Last November we spent a pleasant and expensive afternoon at
the Campbell Apartments in Grand Central Station.
We didn't see the ghost...
Never ridden a bike though.
gster is offline  
Old 04-27-19, 08:41 PM
  #20133  
Senior Member
 
BigChief's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Posts: 3,240
Mentioned: 103 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1299 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 103 Times in 85 Posts
All these years later and we're still scorching!
BigChief is offline  
Old 04-27-19, 09:29 PM
  #20134  
Senior Member
 
ascherer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Manhattan & Woodstock NY
Posts: 2,781

Bikes: 1987 Mercian Pro, 1985 Shogun 500, early '70s Falcon San Remo, 1972 Peugeot PX-10, 1972 Schwinn Paramount P13-9, 1971 Raleigh International, 1971 Peugeot PX-10, 1970 Raleigh Professional Mk1

Mentioned: 114 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 948 Post(s)
Liked 3,043 Times in 1,001 Posts
Originally Posted by gster
Good history.
My first time in NYC was 1970 with my Mother (Midnight Cowboy, Taxi driver..).
As an adult, my wife and I visit at least once a year and search out some of our favourite
places (Fanelli's etc)
and to look for some new ones.
Last November we spent a pleasant and expensive afternoon at
the Campbell Apartments in Grand Central Station.
We didn't see the ghost...
Never ridden a bike though.
Next time you're here, let me know!
__________________
1987 Mercian Pro, 1985 Shogun 500, 197? Falcon San Remo, 1972 Peugeot PX-10, 1972 Schwinn Paramount P13-9, 1971 Peugeot PX-10, 1971 Raleigh International, 1970 Raleigh Professional Mark I
Curator/Team Mechanic: 2016 Dawes Streetfighter, 1984 Lotus Eclair, 1975 Motobecane Jubile Mixte, 1974 Raleigh Sports, 1973 Free Spirit Ted Williams, 1972 Raleigh Super Course, 1971 Philips Sport





ascherer is offline  
Old 04-28-19, 05:35 AM
  #20135  
Senior Member
 
gster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Toronto
Posts: 2,572

Bikes: 1971 Hercules, 1978 Raleigh Superbe, 1978 Raleigh Tourist, 1964 Glider 3 Speed, 1967 Raleigh Sprite 5 Speed, 1968 Hercules AMF 3 Speed, 1972 Raleigh Superbe, 1976 Raleigh Superbe, 1957 Flying Pigeon, 1967 Dunelt 3 Speed

Mentioned: 57 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1030 Post(s)
Liked 445 Times in 288 Posts
Originally Posted by ascherer
Next time you're here, let me know!
Will do,
probably in the fall.
gster is offline  
Old 04-28-19, 05:47 AM
  #20136  
Senior Member
 
gster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Toronto
Posts: 2,572

Bikes: 1971 Hercules, 1978 Raleigh Superbe, 1978 Raleigh Tourist, 1964 Glider 3 Speed, 1967 Raleigh Sprite 5 Speed, 1968 Hercules AMF 3 Speed, 1972 Raleigh Superbe, 1976 Raleigh Superbe, 1957 Flying Pigeon, 1967 Dunelt 3 Speed

Mentioned: 57 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1030 Post(s)
Liked 445 Times in 288 Posts
They're Still Out There

A Triumph Ladies 3 Speed (early '70's ?)
for sale here in Toronto.
$100.00 OBO.
Looks to be fairly clean and complete.

1930 Hercules Update.
I've taken the NOS rim and hub to a bike shop (Riders)
near me to have a front wheel built.
I thought I might do it myself but this way
I know it will:
a- get done
b-be built properly
Should be ready for Tuesday...
These rod brakes/brackets etc are a real devil to
install and set up....
gster is offline  
Old 04-28-19, 08:36 AM
  #20137  
Phyllo-buster
 
clubman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Nova Scotia
Posts: 8,857

Bikes: roadsters, club bikes, fixed and classic

Mentioned: 133 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2299 Post(s)
Liked 2,061 Times in 1,258 Posts
Originally Posted by gster

Toronto Bike shop,
year unknown
It has a certain symmetry with that contraption in front of the store. 1941, made by Williams, a 3/16" gauge and 180mm arm. Could be NOS.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg
20190428_112400.jpg (193.2 KB, 238 views)
clubman is offline  
Old 04-28-19, 03:15 PM
  #20138  
Senior Member
 
gster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Toronto
Posts: 2,572

Bikes: 1971 Hercules, 1978 Raleigh Superbe, 1978 Raleigh Tourist, 1964 Glider 3 Speed, 1967 Raleigh Sprite 5 Speed, 1968 Hercules AMF 3 Speed, 1972 Raleigh Superbe, 1976 Raleigh Superbe, 1957 Flying Pigeon, 1967 Dunelt 3 Speed

Mentioned: 57 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1030 Post(s)
Liked 445 Times in 288 Posts
Originally Posted by clubman
It has a certain symmetry with that contraption in front of the store. 1941, made by Williams, a 3/16" gauge and 180mm arm. Could be NOS.
Nice.
Maybe post on the CCM forum as there's a guy
looking for stuff for a project bike.
gster is offline  
Old 04-28-19, 04:32 PM
  #20139  
Senior Member
 
BigChief's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Posts: 3,240
Mentioned: 103 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1299 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 103 Times in 85 Posts
Originally Posted by gster
They're Still Out There

A Triumph Ladies 3 Speed (early '70's ?)
for sale here in Toronto.
$100.00 OBO.
Looks to be fairly clean and complete.

1930 Hercules Update.
I've taken the NOS rim and hub to a bike shop (Riders)
near me to have a front wheel built.
I thought I might do it myself but this way
I know it will:
a- get done
b-be built properly
Should be ready for Tuesday...
These rod brakes/brackets etc are a real devil to
install and set up....
Are those the old style short rod brake handlebar grips I see? Where did you find them?
BigChief is offline  
Old 04-28-19, 05:00 PM
  #20140  
Senior Member
 
gster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Toronto
Posts: 2,572

Bikes: 1971 Hercules, 1978 Raleigh Superbe, 1978 Raleigh Tourist, 1964 Glider 3 Speed, 1967 Raleigh Sprite 5 Speed, 1968 Hercules AMF 3 Speed, 1972 Raleigh Superbe, 1976 Raleigh Superbe, 1957 Flying Pigeon, 1967 Dunelt 3 Speed

Mentioned: 57 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1030 Post(s)
Liked 445 Times in 288 Posts
Originally Posted by BigChief
Are those the old style short rod brake handlebar grips I see? Where did you find them?
The complete bar set came from a company in Owen Sound (Canada)
that mainly does motorcycle salvage but must have bought out an
old bicycle shop.
Lot's of NOS stock.
Hoop Rider
https://www.hoopriderparts.com/category/bicycle%20parts
worth checking out.
Check the drop down menu

Last edited by gster; 04-28-19 at 06:06 PM.
gster is offline  
Old 04-28-19, 05:28 PM
  #20141  
Senior Member
 
gster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Toronto
Posts: 2,572

Bikes: 1971 Hercules, 1978 Raleigh Superbe, 1978 Raleigh Tourist, 1964 Glider 3 Speed, 1967 Raleigh Sprite 5 Speed, 1968 Hercules AMF 3 Speed, 1972 Raleigh Superbe, 1976 Raleigh Superbe, 1957 Flying Pigeon, 1967 Dunelt 3 Speed

Mentioned: 57 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1030 Post(s)
Liked 445 Times in 288 Posts
Originally Posted by BigChief
Are those the old style short rod brake handlebar grips I see? Where did you find them?
I've had to take some liberties with this bike as
some of the plated parts were too far gone.
Wheels, tires, cranks, Chain ring, bars, chain are all new or NOS.
The frame, fork, seat post and brake linkage, original.
I've probably spent more on this one than any other bike but
hope it will be worthwhile.

Bike-$75.00 (delivered)
Back wheel NOS -$20.00
SA Freewheel-free
Chain-$15.00
Pedals-$25.00
Cotters-$4.00
Half link-$5.00
Bar set (used)-$35.00
Saddle-from stock
Front rim NOS -$20
Front spindle - $16.00
Wheel Build -$100.00
New Tyres/tubes -free
New brake pads-free
Rust remover-$35.00
Paint/grease /bearings/supplies -$15.00
Time spent -Priceless

Still looking for a rear reflector and a
front fender emblem.
I'd like to finish this one up as I've pulled the
old boat of the garage today....

Last edited by gster; 04-28-19 at 05:43 PM.
gster is offline  
Old 04-28-19, 06:42 PM
  #20142  
Senior Member
 
3speedslow's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Jacksonville, NC
Posts: 9,360

Bikes: A few

Mentioned: 117 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1950 Post(s)
Liked 1,095 Times in 648 Posts
Damn! I was wondering when it would show up again! Hoot!!
3speedslow is offline  
Old 04-28-19, 09:26 PM
  #20143  
Full Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: middle of the Great Corn Desert
Posts: 444
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 125 Post(s)
Liked 159 Times in 92 Posts
Originally Posted by gster
That's the right answer.
I'm just impatient and cheap.
I'll have access to some free welding/favours next month.
A proper fix would be brass brazing. Most lugged frames were brass brazed, not welded.
rickpaulos is offline  
Old 04-29-19, 03:01 AM
  #20144  
Senior Member
 
PeterLYoung's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Southport, North Carolina, USA & Pevensey, East Sussex, UK
Posts: 309

Bikes: 1)1992 Trek 970, 2)2010 Trek 6500, 3)1973 Colnago Super, 4)1955 Freddie Grubb Meteor. 5)1993 Airborne Ti-Hag Titanium. 6)1936 BSA 602DX Roadster. 7)1957 Philips P2 Sports. 8)1955 Dayton Roadmaster. 9)1948 Humber Clubman. 10) 1949 Sunbeam WA3 Wayfarer

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 157 Post(s)
Liked 85 Times in 34 Posts
Restoration of 1948 Humber Beeston Clubman

I have mentioned before I have acquired a 1948 Humber Beeston Clubman bicycle from it original owner who bought it new in 1948. This Clubman was one of a trio of versions produced by Raleigh ie. Rudge, Raleigh and Humber, I have read on Sheldon that the Humber version is the rarest of the three. I am already working on the restoration of a Dayton Roadmaster so the Humber is waiting next in line, while it sits and waits I am acquiring the parts I want to get it back to original specification (or as close as possible). One item I needed was a correct period shifter for the Sturmey Archer AM 3 Speed hub, I guess that when the owner could no longer cope with dropped bars and he converted it to straight bars, the SA shifter was replaced with a modern one also the pedals were changed from Rat Trap to rubber treaded ones. I searched for the period shifter I needed having referred to Martin Hanczyc's very helpful Sturmey Archer Shifter Timeline, to my great surprise the one I wanted turned up on eBay (for a very high price I might add), these are pretty rare as far as I can determine so I took a deep breath and purchased it. Here it is, it looks it might never had been installed on a bicycle, the mechanism is tight, no wear apparent, externally it is almost like new with very few blemishes. It was only produced in this form from 1948 to 1953 as it has the old patent number after 1953 the patent number was replaced by the new one. For me this is a great find. Only Pedals, Brake Levers and Mudguards (Fenders) left to find.
I will be getting Mercian to refinish the frame in correct original colour (the paintwork is original). Transfers/Decals are unobtainable so I have an artist producing the artwork for Lloyds to produce a set for me.
I have promised the original owner who is well into his eighties that I will show him the bike when it is completed.


1948 Humber Beeston Clubman. Originally had dropped handlebars with Stem held by Pinch Clamp. A Blog member in USA has kindly supplied a correct Stem (Pinch Clamp type) & Bars so I can put it back to original configuration.



Sturmey Archer GC2 1948/53.



Sturmey Archer GC2 1948/53.



Sturmey Archer GC2 1948/53.




Extract from Martin Hanczyc's web page on SA shifters.

Last edited by PeterLYoung; 04-29-19 at 03:05 AM.
PeterLYoung is offline  
Old 04-29-19, 03:12 AM
  #20145  
Senior Member
 
PeterLYoung's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Southport, North Carolina, USA & Pevensey, East Sussex, UK
Posts: 309

Bikes: 1)1992 Trek 970, 2)2010 Trek 6500, 3)1973 Colnago Super, 4)1955 Freddie Grubb Meteor. 5)1993 Airborne Ti-Hag Titanium. 6)1936 BSA 602DX Roadster. 7)1957 Philips P2 Sports. 8)1955 Dayton Roadmaster. 9)1948 Humber Clubman. 10) 1949 Sunbeam WA3 Wayfarer

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 157 Post(s)
Liked 85 Times in 34 Posts
Originally Posted by gster
I've had to take some liberties with this bike as
some of the plated parts were too far gone.
Wheels, tires, cranks, Chain ring, bars, chain are all new or NOS.
The frame, fork, seat post and brake linkage, original.
I've probably spent more on this one than any other bike but
hope it will be worthwhile.

Bike-$75.00 (delivered)
Back wheel NOS -$20.00
SA Freewheel-free
Chain-$15.00
Pedals-$25.00
Cotters-$4.00
Half link-$5.00
Bar set (used)-$35.00
Saddle-from stock
Front rim NOS -$20
Front spindle - $16.00
Wheel Build -$100.00
New Tyres/tubes -free
New brake pads-free
Rust remover-$35.00
Paint/grease /bearings/supplies -$15.00
Time spent -Priceless

Still looking for a rear reflector and a
front fender emblem.
I'd like to finish this one up as I've pulled the
old boat of the garage today....
STUNNING BOAT: Love that style of speedboat. It will be beautiful when finished. One comment, is that rust creeping through lower bow, should be copper nails, if screws 316 stainless works.
PeterLYoung is offline  
Old 04-29-19, 04:37 AM
  #20146  
Senior Member
 
BigChief's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Posts: 3,240
Mentioned: 103 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1299 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 103 Times in 85 Posts
Originally Posted by gster
The complete bar set came from a company in Owen Sound (Canada)
that mainly does motorcycle salvage but must have bought out an
old bicycle shop.
Lot's of NOS stock.
Hoop Rider
https://www.hoopriderparts.com/category/bicycle%20parts
worth checking out.
Check the drop down menu
So they came on the handlebars.They must be quite old. What a stroke of luck. Funny how after you look at old bikes long enough small details stand out. My eye wants to see them on pre war rod brake roadsters. I don't know the thinking behind this, but all of the English manufacturers seemed to use the short grips on rod brake bikes and longer ones on caliper brake bikes. Not sure when this changed. My 1970 DL-1 came with the same full length Dare grips as the Sports.
BigChief is offline  
Old 04-29-19, 05:04 AM
  #20147  
Senior Member
 
gster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Toronto
Posts: 2,572

Bikes: 1971 Hercules, 1978 Raleigh Superbe, 1978 Raleigh Tourist, 1964 Glider 3 Speed, 1967 Raleigh Sprite 5 Speed, 1968 Hercules AMF 3 Speed, 1972 Raleigh Superbe, 1976 Raleigh Superbe, 1957 Flying Pigeon, 1967 Dunelt 3 Speed

Mentioned: 57 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1030 Post(s)
Liked 445 Times in 288 Posts
Originally Posted by PeterLYoung
I have mentioned before I have acquired a 1948 Humber Beeston Clubman bicycle from it original owner who bought it new in 1948. This Clubman was one of a trio of versions produced by Raleigh ie. Rudge, Raleigh and Humber, I have read on Sheldon that the Humber version is the rarest of the three. I am already working on the restoration of a Dayton Roadmaster so the Humber is waiting next in line, while it sits and waits I am acquiring the parts I want to get it back to original specification (or as close as possible). One item I needed was a correct period shifter for the Sturmey Archer AM 3 Speed hub, I guess that when the owner could no longer cope with dropped bars and he converted it to straight bars, the SA shifter was replaced with a modern one also the pedals were changed from Rat Trap to rubber treaded ones. I searched for the period shifter I needed having referred to Martin Hanczyc's very helpful Sturmey Archer Shifter Timeline, to my great surprise the one I wanted turned up on eBay (for a very high price I might add), these are pretty rare as far as I can determine so I took a deep breath and purchased it. Here it is, it looks it might never had been installed on a bicycle, the mechanism is tight, no wear apparent, externally it is almost like new with very few blemishes. It was only produced in this form from 1948 to 1953 as it has the old patent number after 1953 the patent number was replaced by the new one. For me this is a great find. Only Pedals, Brake Levers and Mudguards (Fenders) left to find.
I will be getting Mercian to refinish the frame in correct original colour (the paintwork is original). Transfers/Decals are unobtainable so I have an artist producing the artwork for Lloyds to produce a set for me.
I have promised the original owner who is well into his eighties that I will show him the bike when it is completed.


1948 Humber Beeston Clubman. Originally had dropped handlebars with Stem held by Pinch Clamp. A Blog member in USA has kindly supplied a correct Stem (Pinch Clamp type) & Bars so I can put it back to original configuration.



Sturmey Archer GC2 1948/53.



Sturmey Archer GC2 1948/53.



Sturmey Archer GC2 1948/53.




Extract from Martin Hanczyc's web page on SA shifters.
That is a nice trigger.
I applaud your dedication to originality.
Good to know that Lloyd's will make custom
transfers from your artwork.
Please keep us updated on the progress.
gster is offline  
Old 04-29-19, 05:06 AM
  #20148  
Senior Member
 
PeterLYoung's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Southport, North Carolina, USA & Pevensey, East Sussex, UK
Posts: 309

Bikes: 1)1992 Trek 970, 2)2010 Trek 6500, 3)1973 Colnago Super, 4)1955 Freddie Grubb Meteor. 5)1993 Airborne Ti-Hag Titanium. 6)1936 BSA 602DX Roadster. 7)1957 Philips P2 Sports. 8)1955 Dayton Roadmaster. 9)1948 Humber Clubman. 10) 1949 Sunbeam WA3 Wayfarer

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 157 Post(s)
Liked 85 Times in 34 Posts
Originally Posted by BigChief
So they came on the handlebars.They must be quite old. What a stroke of luck. Funny how after you look at old bikes long enough small details stand out. My eye wants to see them on pre war rod brake roadsters. I don't know the thinking behind this, but all of the English manufacturers seemed to use the short grips on rod brake bikes and longer ones on caliper brake bikes. Not sure when this changed. My 1970 DL-1 came with the same full length Dare grips as the Sports.
https://www.hoopriderparts.com/Cyclo..._17463464.aspx
They have lots of interesting stuff including a NOS Benelux Derailleur click above, early pattern, where would you find one!!!!
I bought a set of NOS Bluemels 27" Fenders.
PeterLYoung is offline  
Old 04-29-19, 05:06 AM
  #20149  
Senior Member
 
BigChief's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Posts: 3,240
Mentioned: 103 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1299 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 103 Times in 85 Posts
Originally Posted by PeterLYoung
I have mentioned before I have acquired a 1948 Humber Beeston Clubman bicycle from it original owner who bought it new in 1948. This Clubman was one of a trio of versions produced by Raleigh ie. Rudge, Raleigh and Humber, I have read on Sheldon that the Humber version is the rarest of the three. I am already working on the restoration of a Dayton Roadmaster so the Humber is waiting next in line, while it sits and waits I am acquiring the parts I want to get it back to original specification (or as close as possible). One item I needed was a correct period shifter for the Sturmey Archer AM 3 Speed hub, I guess that when the owner could no longer cope with dropped bars and he converted it to straight bars, the SA shifter was replaced with a modern one also the pedals were changed from Rat Trap to rubber treaded ones. I searched for the period shifter I needed having referred to Martin Hanczyc's very helpful Sturmey Archer Shifter Timeline, to my great surprise the one I wanted turned up on eBay (for a very high price I might add), these are pretty rare as far as I can determine so I took a deep breath and purchased it. Here it is, it looks it might never had been installed on a bicycle, the mechanism is tight, no wear apparent, externally it is almost like new with very few blemishes. It was only produced in this form from 1948 to 1953 as it has the old patent number after 1953 the patent number was replaced by the new one. For me this is a great find. Only Pedals, Brake Levers and Mudguards (Fenders) left to find.
I will be getting Mercian to refinish the frame in correct original colour (the paintwork is original). Transfers/Decals are unobtainable so I have an artist producing the artwork for Lloyds to produce a set for me.
I have promised the original owner who is well into his eighties that I will show him the bike when it is completed.


1948 Humber Beeston Clubman. Originally had dropped handlebars with Stem held by Pinch Clamp. A Blog member in USA has kindly supplied a correct Stem (Pinch Clamp type) & Bars so I can put it back to original configuration.



Sturmey Archer GC2 1948/53.



Sturmey Archer GC2 1948/53.



Sturmey Archer GC2 1948/53.




Extract from Martin Hanczyc's web page on SA shifters.
Actually, yours is the second style trigger shifter which is a good thing. This one has the far superior design with an internal spring and uses the same sausage cable end as modern triggers. Good find. The first style uses a lolly pop type cable end, has a longer lever and an external spring which tends to get lost.


BigChief is offline  
Old 04-29-19, 05:13 AM
  #20150  
Senior Member
 
gster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Toronto
Posts: 2,572

Bikes: 1971 Hercules, 1978 Raleigh Superbe, 1978 Raleigh Tourist, 1964 Glider 3 Speed, 1967 Raleigh Sprite 5 Speed, 1968 Hercules AMF 3 Speed, 1972 Raleigh Superbe, 1976 Raleigh Superbe, 1957 Flying Pigeon, 1967 Dunelt 3 Speed

Mentioned: 57 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1030 Post(s)
Liked 445 Times in 288 Posts
Originally Posted by 3speedslow
Damn! I was wondering when it would show up again! Hoot!!
The boat spent the winter in the garage above the car.
I did buy a vintage (1965) Mercury 500 (50hp) motor.

The motor is currently at a Marine shop in Bracebridge and I've been collecting
hardware and cleats over the winter.


Hopefully in the water buy July.
gster is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service -

Copyright © 2024 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.