Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Classic & Vintage
Reload this Page >

For the love of English 3 speeds...

Notices
Classic & Vintage This forum is to discuss the many aspects of classic and vintage bicycles, including musclebikes, lightweights, middleweights, hi-wheelers, bone-shakers, safety bikes and much more.

For the love of English 3 speeds...

Old 06-20-19, 03:59 PM
  #20701  
Senior Member
 
markk900's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Ontario
Posts: 2,643
Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 474 Post(s)
Liked 624 Times in 330 Posts
I had made a press out of a large C clamp and a socket that worked pretty well for “normal”
situations; I bought a bikesmith press and it worked “better” - ie more easily and with less chance of messing up - but it was not night and day better; it also has trouble with slim cranks as it’s quite a substantial tool.
markk900 is offline  
Old 06-20-19, 05:06 PM
  #20702  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 17,075
Mentioned: 476 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3761 Post(s)
Liked 6,409 Times in 2,539 Posts
Good price on a matching set of mid-70s Sports in southeastern MA:

https://boston.craigslist.org/gbs/bi...916156615.html
nlerner is offline  
Old 06-20-19, 06:04 PM
  #20703  
Junior Member
 
BocaJr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: Thibodaux, LoUiSiAna
Posts: 93

Bikes: '71 Peugeot UO-8, '83 Trek 720, '81 Trek 412, '83 Trek 620, '72 Atala Competizione, '51 Raleigh Sports 'C' Tourist, '58 Raleigh Sports, '91 Bridgestone MB-1, '94 Specialized StumpJumper

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 45 Post(s)
Liked 64 Times in 19 Posts
Originally Posted by dweenk
Some where on this forum there are instructions for making a cotter press from a Harbor Freight chain breaker. I made one a few years ago and have been successful with all of the extractions except one where the crank profile was so slim that there was not enough space to align with the pin.
Thanks for the info, found it here:

$16 Cotter Press
BocaJr is offline  
Old 06-20-19, 08:41 PM
  #20704  
Senior Member
 
gster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Toronto
Posts: 2,567

Bikes: 1971 Hercules, 1978 Raleigh Superbe, 1978 Raleigh Tourist, 1964 Glider 3 Speed, 1967 Raleigh Sprite 5 Speed, 1968 Hercules AMF 3 Speed, 1972 Raleigh Superbe, 1976 Raleigh Superbe, 1957 Flying Pigeon, 1967 Dunelt 3 Speed

Mentioned: 57 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1027 Post(s)
Liked 419 Times in 283 Posts
Originally Posted by 3speedslow
My feeble take: torquing on the crankside makes those a little more harder to drive out. Mine are of the nonR-nut variety. They were also driven in quite deep. The NDS cotter slide right out so I think it had something to do with the placement or torque on the pin. BTW, the tool used was the old Park cotter one and both sides had 2 days of soaking before the operation.

I so wanted to find a sock!

The part number on the crank spindle facing up was just PURE luck!
Better luck next time on the sock.
They're like the Willy Wonka chocolate bars.
gster is offline  
Old 06-20-19, 08:44 PM
  #20705  
Senior Member
 
gster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Toronto
Posts: 2,567

Bikes: 1971 Hercules, 1978 Raleigh Superbe, 1978 Raleigh Tourist, 1964 Glider 3 Speed, 1967 Raleigh Sprite 5 Speed, 1968 Hercules AMF 3 Speed, 1972 Raleigh Superbe, 1976 Raleigh Superbe, 1957 Flying Pigeon, 1967 Dunelt 3 Speed

Mentioned: 57 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1027 Post(s)
Liked 419 Times in 283 Posts
Originally Posted by BigChief
I've given some thought to this issue, but I still have more questions than answers. Even in this case, you can see from the picture that unlike aluminum stems and seat posts in steel frames, corrosion wasn't the cause. Even in the LBS where I worked, mechanics in the day would just hammer cotters in. For a long time, I guessed stuck cotters were just the result of being hammered in too hard. But now I wondering if perhaps the alloy they are made from is involved somehow. I've removed many cotters over the years. Probably not enough to be of any real statistical value, but enough to get an impression. I too have noticed that cotters from bikes from the 50s seem to pop out without much fuss and the only time I've had to resort to plan B was on later models. I have also noticed that the alloy of the old cotters...and Bike Smith cotters as well... looks different than more modern cotters. There's no finish on them. They're not very hard and are highly rust resistant. Just a thought.
Good notes.
I suspect the older cotters had some soft lead in them...
gster is offline  
Old 06-21-19, 04:22 AM
  #20706  
Senior Member
 
BigChief's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Posts: 3,240
Mentioned: 103 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1299 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 103 Times in 85 Posts
I suppose it will remain a mystery. It is an interesting question of why people are sometimes forced into extreme measures to remove cotters when there doesn't seem to be any rusting involved and other times cotters that hold the crank arm on just as securely press out easily. The alloy may be a factor, maybe not, but knowing what I do about Raleighs, it wouldn't surprise me one bit if the bean counters at Nottingham in the 70s could have saved 2 cents by using cheaper cotters, they would have done it.
__________________
Inflate Hard
BigChief is offline  
Old 06-21-19, 04:34 AM
  #20707  
Senior Member
 
gster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Toronto
Posts: 2,567

Bikes: 1971 Hercules, 1978 Raleigh Superbe, 1978 Raleigh Tourist, 1964 Glider 3 Speed, 1967 Raleigh Sprite 5 Speed, 1968 Hercules AMF 3 Speed, 1972 Raleigh Superbe, 1976 Raleigh Superbe, 1957 Flying Pigeon, 1967 Dunelt 3 Speed

Mentioned: 57 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1027 Post(s)
Liked 419 Times in 283 Posts
Originally Posted by BigChief
I suppose it will remain a mystery. It is an interesting question of why people are sometimes forced into extreme measures to remove cotters when there doesn't seem to be any rusting involved and other times cotters that hold the crank arm on just as securely press out easily. The alloy may be a factor, maybe not, but knowing what I do about Raleighs, it wouldn't surprise me one bit if the bean counters at Nottingham in the 70s could have saved 2 cents by using cheaper cotters, they would have done it.
Aye Laddie.
A penny saved is a penny earned.
gster is offline  
Old 06-21-19, 06:47 AM
  #20708  
Senior Member
 
Alloyboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2019
Location: Guelph.Canada. 43.54N 80.25W
Posts: 50

Bikes: Empire 3 speed. Resolution Get away mtb. 10 speed.Sekine. No rco. Mountaineer SL.

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 17 Post(s)
Liked 4 Times in 4 Posts
Originally Posted by Johno59
Slacken off the nut a few turns, offer up the frame horizontal and place in the vice. Place one jaw of the vice against the crank opposite the stuck pin, place a socket over the pin top so it clears the pin and presses on the crank body. Place the other jaw directly on the slackened cotter pin nut opposite and press the pin out.
We must be twins, sometimes a hammer on the slackened nut and another below to take the force. Also a 1/2 inch nut with the hammer below fits over the head of the cotter nicely.

Last edited by Alloyboy; 06-21-19 at 10:08 AM. Reason: I can't spell. I'm such a nut, typed "h" instead of "n" originally.
Alloyboy is offline  
Old 06-21-19, 07:30 AM
  #20709  
Senior Member
 
Road Fan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Ann Arbor, MI
Posts: 16,846

Bikes: 1980 Masi, 1984 Mondonico, 1984 Trek 610, 1980 Woodrup Giro, 2005 Mondonico Futura Leggera ELOS, 1967 PX10E, 1971 Peugeot UO-8

Mentioned: 49 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1850 Post(s)
Liked 653 Times in 497 Posts
Originally Posted by 3speedslow


Little oil, drill, punch and repeat.


All nice and clean!


Still ready to do the job after 40 years!
Success! Fighting all the way but the cotter finally came out. All BB parts shiny and free of wear. I found chunks of old grease and a petrified wasp but no sock. The Teflon spray was helping it but new grease is what it needs.

The drill bit stayed mostly in the pin but towards the bottom drifted out into the crank. I can see a little divot out of the wall. Both openings are still round. I will be getting new pins, most likely from Mark.
I had to use a similar method of last resort on my Rudge. The Mark press took out the non-drive cotter instantly, like butter. I don't know how they were doing things in 1952! The drive-side was rather narrow and the Mark press did not squarely hit the threaded end, so it bent. I pushed it back up straight to try hammering with a drift, but that just collapsed the stud and it broke off. I then tried driving it with a ¼ punch, which only deformed and expanded the end, tightening the fit - made it worse. I then took a pin punch, located a drilling point and started with a pilot drilling. Progressively going through my drills, I cut out the inside of the cotter until I felt I could not control the cutting so as to protect the spindle and the chainset. But still no budging of the pin!

I decided the only hope now was to cut out the cotter from the inside - round files. Thin the remaining cotter wall until it was "very" thin, then re-attach NDS arm temporarily and use that leverage to crush the thin-wall cotter. I tried several round mill bastard files, with not much success. What REALLY worked were the various sizes of chain-saw sharpening files - they're also cheap! It still took maybe 10 hours of filing to thin it down, but the strategy worked!

I'm quite disgusted with the whole cotter-removal adventure and intend to ultimately rebuild the Rudge with a TA spindle in the original cups and a vintage TA 5-pin. But I think my first build will be to re-use the original chainset, spindle, and wheels. I now have a lot of hot-rodding parts (alloy rims, an alloy FM, the TA chainset parts, English threaded Berthet pedals), but I'm gonna ride it before I take on the bigger jobs.

One of the bigger jobs is to get a granny capability. The stumbling block is to maintain chain tension. Chain alignment may be an issue as well. It is theoretically possible to shim the Raleigh BB cups to jink a TA double chainset to the right, but I have no clue if such shims (properly fitting) are available. this relationship is generally (I assume) the responsibility of the bike manufacturer, and we owner/tinkerers are left with the "simple" task of managing chainline and chain selection.

I may go to a rear derailleur of the era. There are a few out there designed for owner installation, but I'm not sure I see yet if a claw under the wheel attachment bolt can well-secure a rear mech and allow the indicator window to be used.

So my first shot is going to be to clean out all of the bearings (the original AW seems to be in pretty decent shape), dabble in touching up some of the rust, and see how she pedals!
Road Fan is offline  
Old 06-21-19, 09:46 AM
  #20710  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2018
Location: Brooklyn, NY
Posts: 660

Bikes: 1983 Trek 600, 1972 Raleigh Sports Step Thru, 1963 Rudge Sports, 2007 Dahon MuP8, Dahon Speed, Public Mixte 8-speed IGH, mid-70s Peugeot Mixte AW conversion, Riv Platypus

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 350 Post(s)
Liked 24 Times in 17 Posts
Originally Posted by BocaJr
Thanks for the info, found it here:

$16 Cotter Press
Get my drill press out.... Uhhhh
paulb_in_bkln is offline  
Old 06-21-19, 02:23 PM
  #20711  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2019
Location: Ontario
Posts: 52

Bikes: Miele Latina, Worksman INB, Rapido Eska Folder, Raleigh Superbe, Raleigh Sprite, Soma Stanyan 650b, VeloSolex 3800, Raleigh Competition GS, CTC Supercycle, Raleigh Sports

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 25 Post(s)
Liked 9 Times in 6 Posts
Originally Posted by paulb_in_bkln
Get my drill press out.... Uhhhh



The modified Harbor Freight chain breaker does work. I used it to remove and replace the existing cotters on 3 bikes so far. A worthwhile addition is a brass screw inserted into the end of the press to prevent scoring marks on the ends of the cotters.
Bomarc is offline  
Old 06-21-19, 04:28 PM
  #20712  
Senior Member
 
BigChief's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Posts: 3,240
Mentioned: 103 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1299 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 103 Times in 85 Posts
Originally Posted by Road Fan
I had to use a similar method of last resort on my Rudge. The Mark press took out the non-drive cotter instantly, like butter. I don't know how they were doing things in 1952! The drive-side was rather narrow and the Mark press did not squarely hit the threaded end, so it bent. I pushed it back up straight to try hammering with a drift, but that just collapsed the stud and it broke off. I then tried driving it with a ¼ punch, which only deformed and expanded the end, tightening the fit - made it worse. I then took a pin punch, located a drilling point and started with a pilot drilling. Progressively going through my drills, I cut out the inside of the cotter until I felt I could not control the cutting so as to protect the spindle and the chainset. But still no budging of the pin!

I decided the only hope now was to cut out the cotter from the inside - round files. Thin the remaining cotter wall until it was "very" thin, then re-attach NDS arm temporarily and use that leverage to crush the thin-wall cotter. I tried several round mill bastard files, with not much success. What REALLY worked were the various sizes of chain-saw sharpening files - they're also cheap! It still took maybe 10 hours of filing to thin it down, but the strategy worked!

I'm quite disgusted with the whole cotter-removal adventure and intend to ultimately rebuild the Rudge with a TA spindle in the original cups and a vintage TA 5-pin. But I think my first build will be to re-use the original chainset, spindle, and wheels. I now have a lot of hot-rodding parts (alloy rims, an alloy FM, the TA chainset parts, English threaded Berthet pedals), but I'm gonna ride it before I take on the bigger jobs.

One of the bigger jobs is to get a granny capability. The stumbling block is to maintain chain tension. Chain alignment may be an issue as well. It is theoretically possible to shim the Raleigh BB cups to jink a TA double chainset to the right, but I have no clue if such shims (properly fitting) are available. this relationship is generally (I assume) the responsibility of the bike manufacturer, and we owner/tinkerers are left with the "simple" task of managing chainline and chain selection.

I may go to a rear derailleur of the era. There are a few out there designed for owner installation, but I'm not sure I see yet if a claw under the wheel attachment bolt can well-secure a rear mech and allow the indicator window to be used.

So my first shot is going to be to clean out all of the bearings (the original AW seems to be in pretty decent shape), dabble in touching up some of the rust, and see how she pedals!
Well, if you're looking for a good home for that Ulster Hand crank....
__________________
Inflate Hard
BigChief is offline  
Old 06-22-19, 06:06 AM
  #20713  
Senior Member
 
Road Fan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Ann Arbor, MI
Posts: 16,846

Bikes: 1980 Masi, 1984 Mondonico, 1984 Trek 610, 1980 Woodrup Giro, 2005 Mondonico Futura Leggera ELOS, 1967 PX10E, 1971 Peugeot UO-8

Mentioned: 49 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1850 Post(s)
Liked 653 Times in 497 Posts
Originally Posted by BigChief
Well, if you're looking for a good home for that Ulster Hand crank....
It's not the Red Hand of Ulster, sorry! The bike is a 1952 Rudge Aero Special, clone of the Raleigh Super Lenton of the same year. Raleigh used a more plain chainset on the Raleigh, Rudge, and Humber siblings. Previous years used chainsets with brand insignia, but not in 1952 on the 27, 127, and 327. The Rudge is Model 127.

And my plan is to build initially with the original parts.
Before teardown.
Road Fan is offline  
Old 06-22-19, 06:10 AM
  #20714  
Senior Member
 
gster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Toronto
Posts: 2,567

Bikes: 1971 Hercules, 1978 Raleigh Superbe, 1978 Raleigh Tourist, 1964 Glider 3 Speed, 1967 Raleigh Sprite 5 Speed, 1968 Hercules AMF 3 Speed, 1972 Raleigh Superbe, 1976 Raleigh Superbe, 1957 Flying Pigeon, 1967 Dunelt 3 Speed

Mentioned: 57 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1027 Post(s)
Liked 419 Times in 283 Posts
Good News
The Toronto Vintage Bicycle Show has been approved by the City!

All Systems are Go!
gster is offline  
Old 06-22-19, 06:13 AM
  #20715  
Senior Member
 
gster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Toronto
Posts: 2,567

Bikes: 1971 Hercules, 1978 Raleigh Superbe, 1978 Raleigh Tourist, 1964 Glider 3 Speed, 1967 Raleigh Sprite 5 Speed, 1968 Hercules AMF 3 Speed, 1972 Raleigh Superbe, 1976 Raleigh Superbe, 1957 Flying Pigeon, 1967 Dunelt 3 Speed

Mentioned: 57 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1027 Post(s)
Liked 419 Times in 283 Posts
Originally Posted by Road Fan
It's not the Red Hand of Ulster, sorry! The bike is a 1952 Rudge Aero Special, clone of the Raleigh Super Lenton of the same year. Raleigh used a more plain chainset on the Raleigh, Rudge, and Humber siblings. Previous years used chainsets with brand insignia, but not in 1952 on the 27, 127, and 327. The Rudge is Model 127.

And my plan is to build initially with the original parts.
Before teardown.
That's a handsome machine.
gster is offline  
Old 06-22-19, 06:35 AM
  #20716  
Senior Member
 
gster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Toronto
Posts: 2,567

Bikes: 1971 Hercules, 1978 Raleigh Superbe, 1978 Raleigh Tourist, 1964 Glider 3 Speed, 1967 Raleigh Sprite 5 Speed, 1968 Hercules AMF 3 Speed, 1972 Raleigh Superbe, 1976 Raleigh Superbe, 1957 Flying Pigeon, 1967 Dunelt 3 Speed

Mentioned: 57 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1027 Post(s)
Liked 419 Times in 283 Posts
OT
A friend of mine is looking for another bike.
She already has a nice 3 speed Hercules that I
gave her as a gift last year.
This German Hercules Estrella is for sale up the street.

It's a good lookin' bike but I don't know
much about them.
gster is offline  
Old 06-22-19, 09:55 AM
  #20717  
Senior Member
 
BigChief's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Posts: 3,240
Mentioned: 103 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1299 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 103 Times in 85 Posts
Originally Posted by gster
That's a handsome machine.
Sure is. These bikes have always been sort of a Grail to me. In all my years of bike hunting, I have yet to find a neglected club machine that needed rescue. I still have time left in me. Maybe it will come along. This story does put a hole in my older cotters theory. Still, I think the answer to removing a cotter once it bends is to center punch, drill down until you have a centered counter sink, support the crank and drive with a punch. I think supporting the crank is crucial.
__________________
Inflate Hard

Last edited by BigChief; 06-22-19 at 10:01 AM.
BigChief is offline  
Old 06-22-19, 01:11 PM
  #20718  
Senior Member
 
Road Fan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Ann Arbor, MI
Posts: 16,846

Bikes: 1980 Masi, 1984 Mondonico, 1984 Trek 610, 1980 Woodrup Giro, 2005 Mondonico Futura Leggera ELOS, 1967 PX10E, 1971 Peugeot UO-8

Mentioned: 49 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1850 Post(s)
Liked 653 Times in 497 Posts
Originally Posted by BigChief
Sure is. These bikes have always been sort of a Grail to me. In all my years of bike hunting, I have yet to find a neglected club machine that needed rescue. I still have time left in me. Maybe it will come along. This story does put a hole in my older cotters theory. Still, I think the answer to removing a cotter once it bends is to center punch, drill down until you have a centered counter sink, support the crank and drive with a punch. I think supporting the crank is crucial.
It's not the supporting or punching part, it's the hammer part - anxiety about bashing the frame!!
Road Fan is offline  
Old 06-22-19, 03:30 PM
  #20719  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2019
Location: Portland Oregon
Posts: 976
Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 452 Post(s)
Liked 441 Times in 261 Posts
Originally Posted by Road Fan
It's not the supporting or punching part, it's the hammer part - anxiety about bashing the frame!!
Know any blue collar guys that swing a hammer regularly? Have them do it!

I've swung hammers for so long that hitting the frame wouldn't be the slightest concern to me, same should be true of anyone doing it for a decade or more.
jackbombay is offline  
Old 06-22-19, 05:09 PM
  #20720  
Senior Member
 
Road Fan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Ann Arbor, MI
Posts: 16,846

Bikes: 1980 Masi, 1984 Mondonico, 1984 Trek 610, 1980 Woodrup Giro, 2005 Mondonico Futura Leggera ELOS, 1967 PX10E, 1971 Peugeot UO-8

Mentioned: 49 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1850 Post(s)
Liked 653 Times in 497 Posts
Originally Posted by jackbombay
Know any blue collar guys that swing a hammer regularly? Have them do it!

I've swung hammers for so long that hitting the frame wouldn't be the slightest concern to me, same should be true of anyone doing it for a decade or more.
Great! I don't use them very much. Besides, now the cotters are out.
Road Fan is offline  
Old 06-22-19, 05:11 PM
  #20721  
Senior Member
 
Alloyboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2019
Location: Guelph.Canada. 43.54N 80.25W
Posts: 50

Bikes: Empire 3 speed. Resolution Get away mtb. 10 speed.Sekine. No rco. Mountaineer SL.

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 17 Post(s)
Liked 4 Times in 4 Posts
Originally Posted by jackbombay
Know any blue collar guys that swing a hammer regularly? Have them do it!

I've swung hammers for so long that hitting the frame wouldn't be the slightest concern to me, same should be true of anyone doing it for a decade or more.
I was a striker in the blacksmith shop at one time.
"When I nod my head hit it."
I went through three blacksmiths before they gave me a job in the welding shop. Giggle.
Alloyboy is offline  
Likes For Alloyboy:
Old 06-22-19, 05:36 PM
  #20722  
Senior Member
 
3speedslow's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Jacksonville, NC
Posts: 9,334

Bikes: A few

Mentioned: 117 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1936 Post(s)
Liked 1,039 Times in 624 Posts
Originally Posted by gster
Better luck next time on the sock.
They're like the Willy Wonka chocolate bars.
RIP Gene Wilder!
3speedslow is offline  
Old 06-22-19, 05:46 PM
  #20723  
Senior Member
 
3speedslow's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Jacksonville, NC
Posts: 9,334

Bikes: A few

Mentioned: 117 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1936 Post(s)
Liked 1,039 Times in 624 Posts





First peek. Fresh off the truck. The guy got it from his aunt, didn’t want it. I went to look at it at an asked price of 50. After explaining about English 3 speeds, Phillips history and particulars to watch out for he stops me and says i’m The man for this bike. I made him take 20.

1967 8. Phillips Summer of Love, baby!
3speedslow is offline  
Likes For 3speedslow:
Old 06-22-19, 05:54 PM
  #20724  
Senior Member
 
3speedslow's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Jacksonville, NC
Posts: 9,334

Bikes: A few

Mentioned: 117 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1936 Post(s)
Liked 1,039 Times in 624 Posts
Rust has started to take hold but not too much on most surfaces. The worse area is on the handle bars and test removal with brass brush gets most of it gone. I’m confident the chrome will come out shiny. The paint is solid but rough. Seems to have bumps all over it. Polish and wax will see.

Tires hold air, gears shift through all 3 and the crank turns freely. Brakes grab hard. It’s all only gonna get better as the love goes back into this bike...Groovy man!
3speedslow is offline  
Old 06-22-19, 05:55 PM
  #20725  
Senior Member
 
Alloyboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2019
Location: Guelph.Canada. 43.54N 80.25W
Posts: 50

Bikes: Empire 3 speed. Resolution Get away mtb. 10 speed.Sekine. No rco. Mountaineer SL.

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 17 Post(s)
Liked 4 Times in 4 Posts
I like the chrome on the fork crown. Fenders and bell and carrier. Twenty bucks! You are my kind of shopper.
Alloyboy is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service -

Copyright © 2024 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.