Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Classic & Vintage
Reload this Page >

For the love of English 3 speeds...

Notices
Classic & Vintage This forum is to discuss the many aspects of classic and vintage bicycles, including musclebikes, lightweights, middleweights, hi-wheelers, bone-shakers, safety bikes and much more.

For the love of English 3 speeds...

Old 10-05-20, 01:22 PM
  #23201  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 2,336
Mentioned: 35 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 767 Post(s)
Liked 1,895 Times in 889 Posts
Originally Posted by nlerner
Had the 1950 Lenton Tourist out yesterday to participate in the 3-speed October 2020 Challenge. Intended to commute on it to work this morning, but after packing the saddlebag, I looked down to see that the rear tire was flat. Urp. Didn't have time to repair, but I'll do that this evening (took a different, non-3-speed bike).

Hey, nice bike!
And thanks for the link!
BFisher is offline  
Old 10-05-20, 03:57 PM
  #23202  
Phyllo-buster
 
clubman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Nova Scotia
Posts: 8,824

Bikes: roadsters, club bikes, fixed and classic

Mentioned: 133 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2284 Post(s)
Liked 2,013 Times in 1,238 Posts
Originally Posted by FBOATSB
I am puzzled. I have two of those Sunlite quill extenders installed on two different bikes and have had no issues like you describe. I'm planning to get a third one for my Raleigh Sports. Maybe back it out about 1/4 inch so the taper is not wedged against the top nut. Should not have to tighten it any more than the stem itself. Assuming you greased every thing up pryor to assembly.
I agree, there shouldn't be friction turning the headset so it's got to be the taper. Loosen and pull it up and adjust the headset. And it shouldn't take two hands to set the wedge.
clubman is offline  
Old 10-06-20, 04:03 AM
  #23203  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: Near Pottstown, PA: 30 miles NW of Philadelphia
Posts: 2,169

Bikes: 2 Trek Mtn, Cannondale R600 road, 6 vintage road bikes

Mentioned: 83 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 463 Post(s)
Liked 992 Times in 391 Posts
You folks have helped a lot. Yesterday I had a Columbia 3 spd to service. No big deal except the IGH was no-op. The hub looked black painted and grungy. But I gently scraped the grunge and found a (thanks to youse teaching me how to read them) 1972 SA AW. "OK! They said 3 drops of 30wt in the oil hole." Did that. Then found it would not shift. Indicator chain stuck in high. So a drop or so of 30wt down the shaft, lay the wheel on the floor then on to other projects. Many distractions later I set to changing the tires and tubes (bye bye original tires). While doing them I gently pulled on the chain a few times. Wiggle, wiggle. Then a snitch of movement. Wiggle, wiggle. More movement. After a while it was moving and seemed to be OK. I'd lubed the shifter too and the cable housing. I put it all together and adjusted things then test rode it. AOK?

After almost 50 years of neglect and grimy storage the SA came to life and promised many miles of service, a long future. Not my cuppa but a great bit of kit. You folks know of what you speak. Thanks.
Prowler is online now  
Likes For Prowler:
Old 10-06-20, 07:23 AM
  #23204  
Senior Member
 
Road Fan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Ann Arbor, MI
Posts: 16,846

Bikes: 1980 Masi, 1984 Mondonico, 1984 Trek 610, 1980 Woodrup Giro, 2005 Mondonico Futura Leggera ELOS, 1967 PX10E, 1971 Peugeot UO-8

Mentioned: 49 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1850 Post(s)
Liked 653 Times in 497 Posts
Originally Posted by 1989Pre
Thanks, Gster.
I was going to clean it up and put it back on the road, but then decided to go a bit further. I just bought a cotter pin press (the cotters are original) and a Raleigh fixed cup tool, so will give the heart of the bicycle a look later next week and get it re-lubed with new bearings. I think everything is original on it, including the brake pads and Regency tires. Even the Dyno Hub works!
The saddle is dated 1961, and seems to be just fine! I think I got lucky for $75.00. The seller even delivered it for me. The Dyno-Hub is dated 1961 and the rear Sturmey February of 1962. I hope to have some nice, outdoor pics of it in a couple of weeks.
How do you tell the month?
Road Fan is offline  
Old 10-06-20, 07:31 AM
  #23205  
Old Boy
 
DQRider's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: Minnesota
Posts: 2,390

Bikes: Mostly 1st-generation, top-of-the-line, non-unicrown MTBs/ATBs: All 1984 models: Dawes Ranger, Peugeot Canyon Express, Ross Mt. Whitney (chrome), Schwinn High Sierra, and a 1983 Trek 850.

Mentioned: 134 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 984 Post(s)
Liked 1,715 Times in 611 Posts
Victory at the ABCE

I've been away from this thread for awhile. Other bikes, English and French, have captured my attentions at the moment. The following post is about a bike that I've posted here before, even though it is not (yet?) a 3-speed. It met with enthusiastic approval, so I thought you might be interested in what happened at the All British Cycling Event last month. I could tell you about it, but this thread from Gentleman Cyclists explains it better:




An enthusiastic group of Nutters proved the heart and soul of English cycling continues to thrive and, in fact, grow during these difficult times. A hearty group of 10 gathered for the Friday reception and glasses were clicked well into the evening. Many compared notes of projects that were in progress or completed during the summer shutdown.

The Gentleman’s Tour on Saturday was a remote event as before and we had many tales of adventure for that day; some visited Minnehaha Falls as in years past and some stayed close to the trails along the Mississippi river. Some pre-rode the route of the Gravity Race and found it to be in fine condition for the anticipated challenge.

Sunday events started with the Cycle Jumble and all did quite well with a good balance of buyers and sellers with quality goods in abundance.

Next up was the overly-anticipated Gravity Race and Day-Old Pastry Joust. A howling south wind held most riders back so the distances were short with many not making it to the pastry line. Rest assured, all the competitors enjoyed a good doughnut. The overall winner was Gary riding a Pashley and his mark was so far beyond everyone else that we have placed him under investigation pending review.

The rest of the day was a blur of chatter, pizza, Silver Knight Ale, tails both true and otherwise and, thanks to Steve, it all concluded with enough prizes to ensure everyone went home gifted.

This odd cycling path we have chosen is indeed a difficult cross to bear but certainly not a burden and we have proven yet again the way forward is the humble, durable and dignified English bicycle.

Best along the Path,
Jon Sharratt, Shirt-Tail Organiser

To which I replied:

A Shift in the Wind!


Oh dear... did I forget to bribe someone?

I would call Juston Anderson as a technical expert witness in my defense, but I haven't bribed him yet either.

Suffice to say that the headwind had just turned around for a moment when I jumped on the opportunity to launch. Then, I used the Tour de France aero-descent technique of sitting on my top-tube and leaning forward over the bars. It was that awkward position that caused me to drop my donut when I streaked past the pastry joust station. I had enough momentum to make the second left turn, where I found another tailwind awaiting me, and heard the rapid footsteps of our STO as he pursued me to make the pastry-handoff! I owe you a beer, Jon, at the very least.

The tailwind carried Pepper and I (Pashley Path Racer = PPR = Pepper) past the intersection to the first driveway on the left, where we finally came to a stop. Those Sturmey-Archer drum-brake hubs run on sealed bearings, and it is to that our Mr. Anderson attributed my success, even predicting the outcome before the race. No motors, no voodoo assisted me - I give you my word as a Gentleman Cyclist and Enthusiastic Nutter. Simply a serendipitous shift in wind direction, combined with those hubs and an avant-garde riding technique allowed me to leave all the rest of you in my dust.

And on that, I rest my case.

The Verdict:

Sir Gary,
Rest assured, the investigation has long since been closed and you have been cleared of any wrongdoing.
Now, about that beer...
STO
__________________

Roulez pour la joie, jamais pour la douleur.


USMC 1981-1991 Semper Fi!

Last edited by DQRider; 10-06-20 at 07:37 AM.
DQRider is offline  
Likes For DQRider:
Old 10-06-20, 07:45 AM
  #23206  
Standard Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Brunswick, Maine
Posts: 4,194

Bikes: 1948 P. Barnard & Son, 1962 Rudge Sports, 1963 Freddie Grubb Routier, 1980 Manufrance Hirondelle, 1983 F. Moser Sprint, 1989 Raleigh Technium Pre, 2001 Raleigh M80

Mentioned: 25 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1268 Post(s)
Liked 865 Times in 458 Posts
Originally Posted by Road Fan
How do you tell the month?
The number on the rear hub that comes after the year indication.
(For example 58 8.)
1989Pre is offline  
Old 10-06-20, 07:48 AM
  #23207  
aka Tom Reingold
 
noglider's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: New York, NY, and High Falls, NY, USA
Posts: 40,561

Bikes: 1962 Rudge Sports, 1971 Raleigh Super Course, 1971 Raleigh Pro Track, 1974 Raleigh International, 1975 Viscount Fixie, 1982 McLean, 1996 Lemond (Ti), 2002 Burley Zydeco tandem

Mentioned: 505 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7210 Post(s)
Liked 2,240 Times in 1,319 Posts
Well done, @Prowler. Not everyone will agree, but you did what I would do. If oil gets it to work, then don't do anything else.

If, however, you decide to disassemble the hub, you'll find it easy and educational. You need a bench vise. But it won't be easy if you need to replace the pawl springs. That requires dexterity and patience.
__________________
Tom Reingold, tom@noglider.com
New York City and High Falls, NY
Blogs: The Experienced Cyclist; noglider's ride blog

“When man invented the bicycle he reached the peak of his attainments.” — Elizabeth West, US author

Please email me rather than PM'ing me. Thanks.
noglider is offline  
Likes For noglider:
Old 10-06-20, 08:49 AM
  #23208  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: Near Pottstown, PA: 30 miles NW of Philadelphia
Posts: 2,169

Bikes: 2 Trek Mtn, Cannondale R600 road, 6 vintage road bikes

Mentioned: 83 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 463 Post(s)
Liked 992 Times in 391 Posts
Originally Posted by noglider
If, however, you decide to disassemble the hub, you'll find it easy and educational. You need a bench vise. But it won't be easy if you need to replace the pawl springs. That requires dexterity and patience.
Maybe someday, but not yet.
Prowler is online now  
Old 10-06-20, 12:23 PM
  #23209  
2 wheeled enthusiast
 
threespeedmafia's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2020
Location: Mississippi
Posts: 27

Bikes: More than a few but less than a gross

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7 Post(s)
Liked 33 Times in 16 Posts
Originally Posted by DQRider
I've been away from this thread for awhile. Other bikes, English and French, have captured my attentions at the moment. The following post is about a bike that I've posted here before, even though it is not (yet?) a 3-speed. It met with enthusiastic approval, so I thought you might be interested in what happened at the All British Cycling Event last month. I could tell you about it, but this thread from Gentleman Cyclists explains it better:




An enthusiastic group of Nutters proved the heart and soul of English cycling continues to thrive and, in fact, grow during these difficult times. A hearty group of 10 gathered for the Friday reception and glasses were clicked well into the evening. Many compared notes of projects that were in progress or completed during the summer shutdown.

The Gentleman’s Tour on Saturday was a remote event as before and we had many tales of adventure for that day; some visited Minnehaha Falls as in years past and some stayed close to the trails along the Mississippi river. Some pre-rode the route of the Gravity Race and found it to be in fine condition for the anticipated challenge.

Sunday events started with the Cycle Jumble and all did quite well with a good balance of buyers and sellers with quality goods in abundance.

Next up was the overly-anticipated Gravity Race and Day-Old Pastry Joust. A howling south wind held most riders back so the distances were short with many not making it to the pastry line. Rest assured, all the competitors enjoyed a good doughnut. The overall winner was Gary riding a Pashley and his mark was so far beyond everyone else that we have placed him under investigation pending review.

The rest of the day was a blur of chatter, pizza, Silver Knight Ale, tails both true and otherwise and, thanks to Steve, it all concluded with enough prizes to ensure everyone went home gifted.

This odd cycling path we have chosen is indeed a difficult cross to bear but certainly not a burden and we have proven yet again the way forward is the humble, durable and dignified English bicycle.

Best along the Path,
Jon Sharratt, Shirt-Tail Organiser

To which I replied:

A Shift in the Wind!


Oh dear... did I forget to bribe someone?

I would call Juston Anderson as a technical expert witness in my defense, but I haven't bribed him yet either.

Suffice to say that the headwind had just turned around for a moment when I jumped on the opportunity to launch. Then, I used the Tour de France aero-descent technique of sitting on my top-tube and leaning forward over the bars. It was that awkward position that caused me to drop my donut when I streaked past the pastry joust station. I had enough momentum to make the second left turn, where I found another tailwind awaiting me, and heard the rapid footsteps of our STO as he pursued me to make the pastry-handoff! I owe you a beer, Jon, at the very least.

The tailwind carried Pepper and I (Pashley Path Racer = PPR = Pepper) past the intersection to the first driveway on the left, where we finally came to a stop. Those Sturmey-Archer drum-brake hubs run on sealed bearings, and it is to that our Mr. Anderson attributed my success, even predicting the outcome before the race. No motors, no voodoo assisted me - I give you my word as a Gentleman Cyclist and Enthusiastic Nutter. Simply a serendipitous shift in wind direction, combined with those hubs and an avant-garde riding technique allowed me to leave all the rest of you in my dust.

And on that, I rest my case.

The Verdict:

Sir Gary,
Rest assured, the investigation has long since been closed and you have been cleared of any wrongdoing.
Now, about that beer...
STO
Congratulations on your victory, Sir Gary! The ABCE and Lake Pepin 3 Speed event are on my list of things to do. I just have to find my long way up the river as i'm in Mississippi.
threespeedmafia is offline  
Old 10-06-20, 02:59 PM
  #23210  
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 122
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 70 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 29 Times in 14 Posts
'52 Raleigh Headset Adjustment is getting funky

I noticed the other day that the headset is binding when I turn the handlebars over to the side. However, when I loosen the headset, I can see the play between the race on top of the fork and the bottom of the headtube when I hold the front brake and rock the bike back and forth. Once I tighten it to stop that visible play, it binds on the sides again. The five degrees or so off center rotate smoothly.

I get the feeling it is one of those issues I would have been better off never noticing.

And yes, I rebuilt the whole thing with new bearings when I was rebuilding the bike a year and a half ago.

So, I keep wondering and adjusting - is it better to have it a little bit loose, but visibly rocking between the fork and the headtube, or is it better to have it a little bit tight and binding when the handlebars are turned to the side?

I'll attach a photo, though, of course, in this case, it has no bearing on my question.
Thanks everyone! I've been riding it about 65 miles per week, and it's by far my favorite daily commuter.
carfreefamily is offline  
Old 10-06-20, 03:01 PM
  #23211  
Senior Member
 
Salubrious's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: St. Paul, MN
Posts: 1,588

Bikes: Too many 3-speeds, Jones Plus LWB

Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 352 Post(s)
Liked 254 Times in 113 Posts
Originally Posted by DQRider
I've been away from this thread for awhile. Other bikes, English and French, have captured my attentions at the moment. The following post is about a bike that I've posted here before, even though it is not (yet?) a 3-speed. It met with enthusiastic approval, so I thought you might be interested in what happened at the All British Cycling Event last month. I could tell you about it, but this thread from Gentleman Cyclists explains it better:


Next up was the overly-anticipated Gravity Race and Day-Old Pastry Joust. A howling south wind held most riders back so the distances were short with many not making it to the pastry line. Rest assured, all the competitors enjoyed a good doughnut. The overall winner was Gary riding a Pashley and his mark was so far beyond everyone else that we have placed him under investigation pending review.

The rest of the day was a blur of chatter, pizza, Silver Knight Ale, tails both true and otherwise and, thanks to Steve, it all concluded with enough prizes to ensure everyone went home gifted.

This odd cycling path we have chosen is indeed a difficult cross to bear but certainly not a burden and we have proven yet again the way forward is the humble, durable and dignified English bicycle.

Best along the Path,
Jon Sharratt, Shirt-Tail Organiser

To which I replied:

A Shift in the Wind!


Oh dear... did I forget to bribe someone?

I would call Juston Anderson as a technical expert witness in my defense, but I haven't bribed him yet either.

Suffice to say that the headwind had just turned around for a moment when I jumped on the opportunity to launch. Then, I used the Tour de France aero-descent technique of sitting on my top-tube and leaning forward over the bars. It was that awkward position that caused me to drop my donut when I streaked past the pastry joust station. I had enough momentum to make the second left turn, where I found another tailwind awaiting me, and heard the rapid footsteps of our STO as he pursued me to make the pastry-handoff! I owe you a beer, Jon, at the very least.

The tailwind carried Pepper and I (Pashley Path Racer = PPR = Pepper) past the intersection to the first driveway on the left, where we finally came to a stop. Those Sturmey-Archer drum-brake hubs run on sealed bearings, and it is to that our Mr. Anderson attributed my success, even predicting the outcome before the race. No motors, no voodoo assisted me - I give you my word as a Gentleman Cyclist and Enthusiastic Nutter. Simply a serendipitous shift in wind direction, combined with those hubs and an avant-garde riding technique allowed me to leave all the rest of you in my dust.

And on that, I rest my case.

The Verdict:

Sir Gary,
Rest assured, the investigation has long since been closed and you have been cleared of any wrongdoing.
Now, about that beer...
STO
I'm very much convinced that the wider tires didn't hurt either! There's a lot of studies that have shown that narrow tires are often slower, unless on a smooth board track. So much for my sew-ups- I'll have to be content with 2nd place in that contest.
Salubrious is offline  
Old 10-06-20, 03:03 PM
  #23212  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2019
Location: Portland Oregon
Posts: 976
Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 452 Post(s)
Liked 441 Times in 261 Posts
Its likely wear/pitting of the lower headset races, I have had this issue with several Raleighs over the years. I just adjust the headset for no slop when the bars are straight and it all works fine, a bit of binding on tight corners is far better than having the loose headset feeling whenever you are going straight.
jackbombay is offline  
Old 10-06-20, 03:13 PM
  #23213  
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 122
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 70 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 29 Times in 14 Posts
Originally Posted by jackbombay
Its likely wear/pitting of the lower headset races, I have had this issue with several Raleighs over the years. I just adjust the headset for no slop when the bars are straight and it all works fine, a bit of binding on tight corners is far better than having the loose headset feeling whenever you are going straight.
Thanks, I'll keep it adjusted as I have it now, rather than loosen it up a bit.
carfreefamily is offline  
Old 10-06-20, 07:16 PM
  #23214  
aka Tom Reingold
 
noglider's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: New York, NY, and High Falls, NY, USA
Posts: 40,561

Bikes: 1962 Rudge Sports, 1971 Raleigh Super Course, 1971 Raleigh Pro Track, 1974 Raleigh International, 1975 Viscount Fixie, 1982 McLean, 1996 Lemond (Ti), 2002 Burley Zydeco tandem

Mentioned: 505 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7210 Post(s)
Liked 2,240 Times in 1,319 Posts
@carfreefamily you may want to check it out. See if it's the headset or something worse like a bent steerer tube, though unlikely.
__________________
Tom Reingold, tom@noglider.com
New York City and High Falls, NY
Blogs: The Experienced Cyclist; noglider's ride blog

“When man invented the bicycle he reached the peak of his attainments.” — Elizabeth West, US author

Please email me rather than PM'ing me. Thanks.
noglider is offline  
Old 10-08-20, 07:11 PM
  #23215  
Senior Member
 
campngolf's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: NorCal
Posts: 197

Bikes: 70's Raleigh Sports, '12 Specialized Secteur

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 13 Post(s)
Liked 4 Times in 4 Posts
So now that I'm no longer punching a time clock, I've finally started cruising the neighborhood in my early 70's Raleigh Sports. Overall, she's in pretty good shape, but dang, I forgot how heavy she was. I plan to replace the old Brooks with a new B67 and hope to replace the shifter since I think that's what's contributing to the auto shift between 1st and 2nd. The shifter has been buggered up a bit when I bought the bike.

I've read that swapping out the rims for something lighter can greatly improve the ride so I believe that may be my winter project. I've only undertaken minor bike repairs/projects so not sure I'm ready to tackle building wheels, but hey, I've got lots of time now and what's the worst that can happen.

Looking for thoughts/suggestions/tips or cautionary tales.

Thanks,

Camp
campngolf is offline  
Old 10-08-20, 08:37 PM
  #23216  
Old Boy
 
DQRider's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: Minnesota
Posts: 2,390

Bikes: Mostly 1st-generation, top-of-the-line, non-unicrown MTBs/ATBs: All 1984 models: Dawes Ranger, Peugeot Canyon Express, Ross Mt. Whitney (chrome), Schwinn High Sierra, and a 1983 Trek 850.

Mentioned: 134 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 984 Post(s)
Liked 1,715 Times in 611 Posts
Originally Posted by threespeedmafia
Congratulations on your victory, Sir Gary! The ABCE and Lake Pepin 3 Speed event are on my list of things to do. I just have to find my long way up the river as i'm in Mississippi.
That's a long way to go, for sure. And with the uncertain weather in these parts, you risk a miserable vacation experience. However, I'm sure the folks of Gentleman Cyclists, both Ladies and Gents BTW, would do their best to welcome you and show you a good time. If you have to choose between the two events, I would encourage you to go for the Lake Pepin tour. For the past 6 years, this has been the highlight of my riding season. SO MUCH FUN! Here are some of the photos I have taken on previous rides:















So, if that motivates you enough to drag yourself up here, we will do our best to make it worth the trip.

Cheers!

.
__________________

Roulez pour la joie, jamais pour la douleur.


USMC 1981-1991 Semper Fi!
DQRider is offline  
Likes For DQRider:
Old 10-11-20, 03:03 PM
  #23217  
Junior Member
 
Dewey101's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: Arlington, VA
Posts: 134

Bikes: '73 Raleigh Sports; 2017 Breezer Downtown 8 ST converted to ebike

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 34 Post(s)
Liked 20 Times in 19 Posts
Didn’t work

Originally Posted by FBOATSB
I am puzzled. I have two of those Sunlite quill extenders installed on two different bikes and have had no issues like you describe. I'm planning to get a third one for my Raleigh Sports. Maybe back it out about 1/4 inch so the taper is not wedged against the top nut. Should not have to tighten it any more than the stem itself. Assuming you greased every thing up pryor to assembly.
Thanks, I did as you suggested and took the handlebar off, loosened the extender, tightened the headset again, greased the extender outside, raised it up 1/4”, hand tightened it, reinstalled the handlebar, but the same thing happened turning the headset and loosening the extender. I’ve removed it and reinstalled the handlebars. Are there any good 1” long stems I can use? I read Nitto are well regarded. I understand this means replacing the handlebar as well.

Last edited by Dewey101; 10-12-20 at 05:29 AM.
Dewey101 is offline  
Old 10-11-20, 09:25 PM
  #23218  
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 6
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
I love that Pashley!
What style!
michaelcummings is offline  
Old 10-11-20, 09:44 PM
  #23219  
Newbie
 
Mikier's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 61

Bikes: 1974 Falcon Olympic ,1982 Trek 710(both all Reynolds 531), 1974 Raleigh Sports, the'Keep Portland Weird'Montgomery Ward Open Road 10sp with basement sourced modern parts, 1989 TREK 400, 1980s Nishiki mixte, 1981 VINER Special Professional,Rockhopper

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 13 Post(s)
Liked 11 Times in 4 Posts
Help... loose front wheel bearings

I had my first front tire flat on my 1974 Raleigh Sports. As I pulled the front wheel from the fork, bearings started falling out. The bearings have nothing retaining them other than the fork?
Mikier is offline  
Old 10-11-20, 10:13 PM
  #23220  
www.theheadbadge.com
 
cudak888's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Southern Florida
Posts: 28,471

Bikes: https://www.theheadbadge.com

Mentioned: 121 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2392 Post(s)
Liked 4,248 Times in 2,056 Posts
Originally Posted by carfreefamily
I noticed the other day that the headset is binding when I turn the handlebars over to the side...
The crown race definitely looks to be an replacement for the original. I'd start there - and just to be on the safe side, I'd face the crown race too before installing a correct, original replacement.

-Kurt
__________________












cudak888 is offline  
Old 10-12-20, 12:09 PM
  #23221  
Senior Member
 
Salubrious's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: St. Paul, MN
Posts: 1,588

Bikes: Too many 3-speeds, Jones Plus LWB

Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 352 Post(s)
Liked 254 Times in 113 Posts
Originally Posted by Mikier
I had my first front tire flat on my 1974 Raleigh Sports. As I pulled the front wheel from the fork, bearings started falling out. The bearings have nothing retaining them other than the fork?
Certainly not!

A Raleigh front hub has two cones, one of which is adjustable and the other is not- the latter is simply tightened securely at the end of the inside threads on the axle. In this manner you really only have to set up one cone rather than both. If the bearings were falling out and given that the fork is from a 1974, the most likely thing to be happening is that the front wheel was replaced. Some less expensive wheels in the old days didn't have locknuts on the cones, so the installation in the fork was the only way to lock the cones on such a hub (my 1940 Columbia is set up this way). Raleigh didn't make anything like this. The reason I think your wheel was replaced is that if it was a Raleigh hub for the cones to be so loose as to lose bearings you wouldn't have been able to remove the wheel from the fork and it would have had a terrible amount of play!!
Salubrious is offline  
Old 10-12-20, 12:38 PM
  #23222  
Phyllo-buster
 
clubman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Nova Scotia
Posts: 8,824

Bikes: roadsters, club bikes, fixed and classic

Mentioned: 133 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2284 Post(s)
Liked 2,013 Times in 1,238 Posts
Originally Posted by Dewey101
Thanks, I did as you suggested and took the handlebar off, loosened the extender, tightened the headset again, greased the extender outside, raised it up 1/4”, hand tightened it, reinstalled the handlebar, but the same thing happened turning the headset and loosening the extender. I’ve removed it and reinstalled the handlebars. Are there any good 1” long stems I can use? I read Nitto are well regarded. I understand this means replacing the handlebar as well.
One more thing to check before investing in a stem is the steerer tube. Perhaps it's bent. Or worse, cracked.

Last edited by clubman; 10-12-20 at 02:09 PM.
clubman is offline  
Likes For clubman:
Old 10-12-20, 03:19 PM
  #23223  
Full Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2018
Posts: 210
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 116 Post(s)
Liked 87 Times in 49 Posts
Mongrel Lenton

I am sending pics of my latest folly.

I bought this bike on eBay. According to my research, the frame is clearly set up for a 10 speed deraileur, but it has ea1 wheels, a 55 AW rear hub laced 3 cross, the front wheel is laced radial. Both wheels have wingnuts on the axles. The jockey wheel clamp partly covers the 531 decal(no braze on for the jockey wheel).

It has an elegant willams style single ring crankset. There are no obvious marks from either a front or rear deraileur on the frame. It has a serial number on the bottom bracket xy and 4 digits.

I assume this was put together from two or more bikes, unless raleigh assembled a bunch of bikes from old inventory for export to generate cash flow.


bluesteak is offline  
Likes For bluesteak:
Old 10-12-20, 03:25 PM
  #23224  
Full Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2018
Posts: 210
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 116 Post(s)
Liked 87 Times in 49 Posts
Lenton

Front wheel 32 spokes
bluesteak is offline  
Old 10-12-20, 03:25 PM
  #23225  
Full Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2018
Posts: 210
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 116 Post(s)
Liked 87 Times in 49 Posts
Rear wheel 40 spokes
bluesteak is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service -

Copyright © 2024 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.