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Modern classic / classic in the making

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Modern classic / classic in the making

Old 04-07-10, 09:48 AM
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Monkey Face
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Modern classic / classic in the making

Hi.

Which bike of the last 10 years do you think is a modern classic?

Reason for asking is that I'd like a 'second' bike that I can take out in wet, muddy conditions and not have to be too precious about it - preferably alloy or carbon ... don't ban me from the Forum!

I guess some people might call it a winter bike, but I don't want a 20 year old heap of iron, like a Mercian (sorry Mercian fans).
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Old 04-07-10, 10:50 AM
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If you're riding in the wet you want a bike you can fit fenders on and you're going to be riding through puddles with hidden holes which means you need wider tires with more air volume. There are very few carbon or aluminum road bikes with that kind of clearance. Carbon fork designers like to flow the shape of the fork from the headset down to a narrow split. A steel fork can have a broad, square shouldered crown that can handle anything.

Aluminum frames with their oversize tubes run out of space to maneuver in the area right behind the bottom bracket leaving space tight for fitting both fenders and wider tires.

Funny you should mention Mercian. I was on a big two-day ride and when a little tiny amount of percipitation floated down out of the sky cell phone calls were made by numerous c-f owners to come rescue them. At the next rest stop I found an old Mercian and a Bob Jackson, both with fenders, still being ridden the distance by their owners in the rain.

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Old 04-07-10, 11:16 AM
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There's a dude who rides a super fancy Trek CF bike who's always got it in the shop at my LBS. Owner says he trains for TT in any weather and he regularly brings that bike in after rain storms to be disassembled and drained lest the CF get sogged out.
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Old 04-07-10, 11:17 AM
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As for a "classic bike" that you can use for wet rides, nothing wrong with hunting down something like a Specialized Allez CF framed bike from the 90's, if you can get one that was not abused. The later CF framed Vitus Carbones from up to the mid 90's might work well too. There were definitel some of these that might have had tube/lug connection loosening problems, but there are many more that are still on the road with no problems of such at all. I suspect it was more of a factory QC problem that caused some of these older CF frames to discombobulate on their owners.
You do have to ba careful though as corrosion can develop between the CF tubes and the Al lugs of these bikes as electrolysis is a common problem with CF and metals. Just make sure that it had not developed yet and watch those juctions if you do plan to ride the bike in the wet very much and not let the bike sit wet for long periods of time.

When you say "Classic" I personally take that to be more of an aesthetic assesment on a bike. I'm biased towards classic 80's to early 90's racing bicycle aesthetics, so it's hard for me to look at these newer bikes and see classics in the making as many of them just have chracteristics that I just can't seem to get to like.....Uhmmm humongous/ugly Brifters, less than hadsome looking "tail dragger" frames (that mostly come only in just S, M, L sizes), Ho-hum looking cranksets that have forms that look like chocolate left in the sun too long, very boring saddle shapes, brakesets that look just like every other out there, bladed/radial spoked deep V rimmed wheelsets....that look just like every other one out there. lugless composite, Ti and Al frames that do not have anything interesting happeneing at the tube junctions, contorted looking "anatomic " bend, skyward angled bars, too many cables/casings up front............Post 80's and 90's bike are just too ugly for me to ever consider as "classic" bikes......You ask a C&Ver, and unfortunately, this could be a common answer to this question.
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Old 04-07-10, 11:26 AM
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Generally, I can't see how "modern classic" will apply to any alloy or carbon frame made in the last 10 years. Maybe some current, hi-zoot, carbon space-goop machines will become classic but that doesn't fit your non-precious criteria. I don't think you can have it both ways. .
You sir, are a tough customer to please...or a troll? A Mercian is exactly the kind of "heap of iron" I'd want for my B-bike.
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Old 04-07-10, 11:27 AM
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Classic in the making

https://www.bikeforums.net/showthread...wal-mart-fixie....
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Old 04-07-10, 11:28 AM
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Originally Posted by Monkey Face View Post
Reason for asking is that I'd like a 'second' bike that I can take out in wet, muddy conditions and not have to be too precious about it - preferably alloy or carbon ... don't ban me from the Forum!
With the need to ride in wet, muddy conditions as your primary requirement, I'd be looking for a titanium or stainless (953, XCr) frameset. Personally, I'd avoid aluminum, but that's just me.
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Old 04-07-10, 11:35 AM
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Yeah, you'll not find much CF or Al love here.
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Originally Posted by bragi "However, it's never a good idea to overgeneralize."
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Old 04-07-10, 11:37 AM
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Originally Posted by clubman View Post
Generally, I can't see how "modern classic" will apply to any alloy or carbon frame made in the last 10 years. Maybe some current, hi-zoot, carbon space-goop machines will become classic but that doesn't fit your non-precious criteria. I don't think you can have it both ways. .
You sir, are a tough customer to please...or a troll? A Mercian is exactly the kind of "heap of iron" I'd want for my B-bike.
I did not notice that "heap of Iron" comment from the OP.....where the heck did that come from!
Does he think that newer "heaps" of materials are for some reason that much better??
For me myself, I could consider a "basic" 80's 531 framed Peugeot to be a nice classic second bike that should never fail anyone in all conditions. Or a 600 or 700 series Trek too. Tough but fast and light enough and definitely not "heaps"!


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Old 04-07-10, 11:43 AM
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I think those Team Chance MTBs are VERY classic. I agree with Scoop about titanium...some of the ti builds are going to be considered timeless. I really like what Bilenky does and I LOVE a lot of the Independent Fabrications bikes.
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Old 04-07-10, 12:00 PM
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Originally Posted by KonAaron Snake View Post
I think those Team Chance MTBs are VERY classic. I agree with Scoop about titanium...some of the ti builds are going to be considered timeless. I really like what Bilenky does and I LOVE a lot of the Independent Fabrications bikes.
To echo and add to that, I've seen Ultegra-equipped Litespeeds and Deans in the $500-600 range which, given the timeless nature, is a lot of bike for the money.
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Old 04-07-10, 12:04 PM
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Originally Posted by Chombi View Post
I did not notice that "heap of Iron" comment from the OP.....where the heck did that come from!
I thought I'd challenge the notion that 'classic' has to be steel and has to be older than, say 1990's. Seems only a few share that view (wrong forum maybe?). I don't really see the prejudice against modern materials as long as the bike has a certain 'mojo'.

For instance, I regret selling my brushed alloy Cannondale CAAD8 - I think that will turn out to be a classic... one of the last made in USA Cannondales, TdF bike, stiff but comfy frame and a fairly traditional geometry. Will take Crud racing style mudguards. (Sold to purchase a 'precious' Tommasini... I guess no complaints about that one!)

Maybe the Cannondale answers my own question.
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Old 04-07-10, 12:05 PM
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I'm keeping my eye out for one of these:

Lemond Tete de Course titanium
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Old 04-07-10, 12:07 PM
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It's modern. It's a classic. The fork is a little weird.



Or if I had the cash:

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Old 04-07-10, 12:10 PM
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If you are looking for a wet and muddy condition bike, you might want to look into a cyclocross bike (as far as modern bikes go) or an early 90s hybrid/MTB. Lots of price differential in those 2 extreme options
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Old 04-07-10, 12:28 PM
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I, too, view the concept of "vintage and classis" to be, like the study of history, a sliding scale taking into consideration change and innovation.

Now, with that,

1995 Land Shark X Shark:



2000 Litespeed Appalachian cyclocross bike:

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Old 04-07-10, 12:39 PM
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There is no way on Earth RFC's bikes aren't classics.
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Old 04-07-10, 01:37 PM
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I'd second that Binachi, or go Litespeed. Except I wouldn't put a purse on the back of the Litepseed.

When I buy a new bike it will be a Litespeed or some other Ti bike.
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Old 04-07-10, 01:44 PM
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Originally Posted by Monkey Face View Post
I thought I'd challenge the notion that 'classic' has to be steel and has to be older than, say 1990's. Seems only a few share that view (wrong forum maybe?). I don't really see the prejudice against modern materials as long as the bike has a certain 'mojo'.

For instance, I regret selling my brushed alloy Cannondale CAAD8 - I think that will turn out to be a classic... one of the last made in USA Cannondales, TdF bike, stiff but comfy frame and a fairly traditional geometry. Will take Crud racing style mudguards. (Sold to purchase a 'precious' Tommasini... I guess no complaints about that one!)

Maybe the Cannondale answers my own question.
It's just my opinion and not prejudice against material. Bikes can't really be defined as classics 10 years after they've been made, can they? We all think we're futurists and speculate that our favourite rides will be classics. I don't want a Surly Cross Check but it may become a classic.

Merlin, Chance, Litespeed, C-dale, Klein, Rocky Mtn, Specialized, Serottas, Ritchey, Brodie, Kona and many, many others have all been around for at least 20 years and all are accepted as (North American) classics and many aren't steel....I'd like one of each.

I've sold 2 C-dales and regret losing both has well.
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Old 04-07-10, 03:13 PM
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Originally Posted by clubman View Post
Bikes can't really be defined as classics 10 years after they've been made, can they?
I think so. I mean, what's the definition of classic? My wife drives a Porsche Boxster... I thought that was a classic the day it was launched.

Maybe classic is something that breaks new ground. Maybe it's something that harks back to a bygone age. Maybe it's something ubiquitous, or something that has - over time - become generic.

Just questioning what's classic and why; seems too narrow a view to say it's something of a certain age and of a certain make. (That's not a personal attack on anyone's opinion.)

Maybe it's a discussion for another thread.
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Old 04-07-10, 03:36 PM
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I think we're in the right thread but it's become more about semantics and defining the word classic. In the context of this forum, you mention "classic bike" and most members think Masi/Raleigh/Peugeot/Vitus or whatever marque they put on the pedestal regardless of frame material.. Modern bikes built in traditional ways are "keepers of the flame". Late model modern carbon and alloy bikes don't really belong in either of those categories...yet.

I'm off the soapbox! Gotta go.
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Old 04-07-10, 03:37 PM
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The Orbea Orca

My choice would be Orbea Orca! It is considered the closest to steel frame bike for everything, with exceptional acceleration, superb hill climbing and stable down hill speeds! I have it's sibling Orbea Onix and it's great. I love the lines and functionality of the Orbea Orca, would consider it a future classic! Cheers, Gioscinelli
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Old 04-07-10, 03:51 PM
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classic in the making?
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Old 04-07-10, 03:59 PM
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Originally Posted by gioscinelli View Post
My choice would be Orbea Orca! It is considered the closest to steel frame bike for everything, with exceptional acceleration, superb hill climbing and stable down hill speeds! I have it's sibling Orbea Onix and it's great. I love the lines and functionality of the Orbea Orca, would consider it a future classic! Cheers, Gioscinelli
"Orca"...funny how model names had changed so much too. We were so used to names sounding like Superissimo, PX10, Professionel, San Cristobal, Limited, Criterium, Sprint, Giro, Competizione, Premier, Arabesque, Mockba 80,,...etc...etc..... so serious sounding these names were.... "Orca" sounds so "animated" and much more fun for some reason, in comparison.

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Old 04-07-10, 04:02 PM
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Originally Posted by EjustE View Post
If you are looking for a wet and muddy condition bike, you might want to look into a cyclocross bike (as far as modern bikes go) or an early 90s hybrid/MTB. Lots of price differential in those 2 extreme options
+1 to what E said. If you're really concerned with wet and muddy condition maybe a Sala La Cruz, Lemond Poprad or Soma Double Cross DC. All of these have disc brakes. No need to worry about mud or water for stopping at least. All of these will be classics someday in the future. He is my Soma
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