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Old 04-20-10, 02:27 PM   #1
klasextas
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Crankset replacement for 1991 Bridgestone RB-2

Hi! I have a Bridgestone RB-2, that I bought new some 18 years ago. Took it to the local repairman who told me it needed a new drivetrain...but, as he said, he wasn't sure it would be possible to replace it because the crankset could be threaded in an obsolete way...so I figure I might try to investigate and do it myself. But ofcourse I have no idea if the thread is Italian, English or French, and if you can find a replacement for it...

Anyone know about this? Can it be replaced, and with what?
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Old 04-20-10, 03:04 PM   #2
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It's Japanese. Your repairman should know that Japanese means British threads. I put a Sugino XD600 and a Shimano cartridge bottom bracket on my MB-2.
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Old 04-20-10, 03:52 PM   #3
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Did your repairman offer to take the bike off your hands at the same time, it being obsolete and all? I have an '89 RB-1, and I just put an English threaded Shimano BB into it. Amazingly, it works just fine...;-)
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Old 04-20-10, 03:54 PM   #4
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Try and find a bike shop with an actual bike mechanic.
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Old 04-20-10, 04:34 PM   #5
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Try and find a bike shop with an actual bike mechanic.
+1 Local repairman must be a newb. You have a pretty typical nice Japanese bike. Finding parts is as easy as it gets.
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Old 04-20-10, 04:53 PM   #6
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Yup, you can put a brand new Hollowtech II BB in it like I did with my Bridgestone.
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Old 04-20-10, 05:01 PM   #7
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...so I figure I might try to investigate and do it myself.
This is how it all starts - just a little sip...
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Old 04-20-10, 05:08 PM   #8
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Sheesh. Steer clear of that shop in the future; that's a spectacular display of cluelessness. The bike assemblers at Wal mart might be more qualified to work on a bike.
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Old 04-20-10, 10:54 PM   #9
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Thanks guys for your answers! This was just what I needed, I was ready to throw the bike away at first...I'm glad I checked with the real experts first!
Now, the plan is to repair it myself and, if that goes as it might , take the bike to another repairman!
Thanks again for giving me hope to save my old friend!
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Old 04-22-10, 02:33 PM   #10
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Well, I managed to remove the cranks today and am now facing the bottom brackets lock rings (?)...am I right guessing it is not a cartridge bottom bracket, but a "loose cup bracket"? I learned on a tutorial on You Tube that you would first remove the drive side of the bracket, or the fixed lock ring? So...if that is correct, is this lock ring then loosened by turning it clockwise, like I think the bracket itself will be? As I understand from your answers above, I can replace it with a new cartridge bottom bracket?
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Old 04-22-10, 02:54 PM   #11
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The non-drive side, the one with the lock ring, is normally threaded, so the lock ring loosens counter clockwise, as does the adjustable cup.

The drive side, with the fixed cup, is reverse threaded, so loosens clockwise.

Bicycle Tutor has a clear video demonstrating the process. And another for installing the cartridge.
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Old 04-22-10, 03:09 PM   #12
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Perfect, great stuff. Seems I need some new tools to do this properly (and a new storage room for my new tools...)
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Old 04-22-10, 03:17 PM   #13
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You're toast, man. Welcome to the club.
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Old 04-22-10, 08:01 PM   #14
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Old 04-22-10, 08:19 PM   #15
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I hope it doesn't, but that fixed cup could turn out to be your worst nightmare.
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Old 04-22-10, 11:33 PM   #16
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I hope it doesn't, but that fixed cup could turn out to be your worst nightmare.
Because it might be stuck? But with the right sized wrench and a hammer everythings possible, no? And perhaps a spray of that oil...wish me luck!
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Old 04-22-10, 11:37 PM   #17
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That is a mighty fine bike to be starting out on. I wish you the best of luck though. I will also recommend spending lots of time on sheldonbrown.com to get the basics down. The park tools website is also excellent as is their big blue book.
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Old 04-22-10, 11:41 PM   #18
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But with the right sized wrench and a hammer everythings possible, no?
I've turned a wrench into high speed shrapnel with that line of thinking.

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And perhaps a spray of that oil...wish me luck!
One day I will try letting it soak and see if that helps. Good luck.
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Old 04-24-10, 07:22 AM   #19
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It worked! I sprayed and sprayed and all of a sudden the lock ring came off. Same with the fixed cup on the other side. So now I'll go to a shop (another shop than in post one) and show them what I got and ask for a replacement. And before assembling the new bb the frame needs some cleaning, of course.
This is getting fun!
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Old 04-24-10, 07:33 AM   #20
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How often did you ride this bike in the 18 years? We've established the individual you originally brought it to has questionable competence. Why did he suggest you replace the entire drivetrain? At worst, you would probably only need to replace chainrings, freewheel/cassette and chain - and that's if it was ridden several thousand (probably 10 thousand for freewheel and chainrings) miles/kilometers. Those replacement parts should be fairly easy to find.

No worries that you removed the BB assembly. It probably needed new grease. You should be able to reuse it if the bearing surfaces are not pitted or gouged. Admittedly, though, the adjustment of a loose cup BB is probably the most difficult maintenance repair, especially if it's a low end unit.
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Old 04-24-10, 08:35 AM   #21
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Hmm...it sure needed new grease, and the interiors of the frame was a little bit rusty, so I think the removal was not a waste of time. Now I wonder what are the pros and cons of the two alternatives keeping the loose cup BB and replacing it with a cartridge BB? The cartridge I think I can install myself, but the loose cup I would have to have a professional help me with. If I replace, will I have to get new crank arms, or can I fit the old ones and only replace the chain rings? The spindle has square ends. And wouldn't a modern cartridge BB last better?
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Old 04-24-10, 09:06 AM   #22
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Look at the bearing races on the BB that you have. If they're okay, I'd just buy a $2 tube or tub of grease and try to repack and adjust myself. It's a little tricky, but I enjoy doing that. Just put on a pot of coffee and take your time. It helps if you have the proper tools, though.

In fact, since the one side is fixed, I find the BB adjustment to be much easier than the hub adjustment.

As to whether or not your chainrings can be replaced separately, it would help if you posted a picture. They may not even need to be replaced at all.
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Old 04-24-10, 10:23 AM   #23
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OK, good idea: here are pictures of the chain rings!
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File Type: jpg DPP_0002..jpg (17.6 KB, 11 views)
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Old 04-24-10, 12:24 PM   #24
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The rings look slightly worn, but it looks to me they have plenty left. Is there's a way you can measure your chain (if you kept it?). You should be able to count 12 links in 12 inches (center of pin to center of pin). Unfortunately, not sure there's a simply equivalent in the metric system. See here for some explanation of chain stretch: http://sheldonbrown.com/chains.html

You've owned the bike from new. Do you know how much you've ridden it?

Did the 'mechanic' you brought the bike to justify his opinion on your drivetrain?
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Old 04-24-10, 12:58 PM   #25
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The rings look slightly worn, but it looks to me they have plenty left. Is there's a way you can measure your chain (if you kept it?). You should be able to count 12 links in 12 inches (center of pin to center of pin). Unfortunately, not sure there's a simply equivalent in the metric system. See here for some explanation of chain stretch: http://sheldonbrown.com/chains.html

You've owned the bike from new. Do you know how much you've ridden it?

Did the 'mechanic' you brought the bike to justify his opinion on your drivetrain?
No, I don't have the chain left, so there's no way I can check it.
A wild guess on how much i've ridden the bike would be 5000 kilometers, but, again, a wild guess at best!
And finally, no, he didn't justify the need to change the drivetrain. I've had thoughts on it myself, thinking the chain rings looked worn out and also that the chain sometimes "slipped" on the chain ring when pushing hard, if you see what I mean...
I think I'll take it to another shop, to get a second opinion on what to change on it, if anything. I want it to feel as new when I start cykling again, so if the parts are worn but with some life left I'll probably get new ones (having taking them apart and all...).
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