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How to restore Gios Torino Super Record?

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How to restore Gios Torino Super Record?

Old 05-31-10, 04:41 PM
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anthony691
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How to restore Gios Torino Super Record?

A year ago I purchased a Gios Torino Super Record at a flea market. It is a beautiful bike with a panto chainring, seatpost, and stem and Campy SR. A year later, it still has no brake cables, hoods, or barrel adjusters. The rims are mismatched. The bars are wrapped in filthy, ratty, red cloth tape. The saddle's leather is cracked and torn. It is such a nice bike that I've been afraid to do anything to it (least of all ride it).

I'm curious as to how various restoration efforts affect a bike's value. Touching up the paint? Having the entire frame repainted/applying new decals? Recovering the saddle? Having the hubs built up to Open Pros?

Would a beautifully restored (resprayed, fresh decals) Super Record be worth more or less than a completely original one in so-so condition?
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Old 05-31-10, 04:55 PM
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Originally Posted by anthony691 View Post

Would a beautifully restored (resprayed, fresh decals) Super Record be worth more or less than a completely original one in so-so condition?
No - though it depends on the definition of so-so. The key element is that you're very unlikely to get your money out of a restoration - leave that to the next guy/gal.
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Old 05-31-10, 05:06 PM
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Originally Posted by anthony691 View Post
A year ago I purchased a Gios Torino Super Record at a flea market. It is a beautiful bike with a panto chainring, seatpost, and stem and Campy SR. A year later, it still has no brake cables, hoods, or barrel adjusters. The rims are mismatched. The bars are wrapped in filthy, ratty, red cloth tape. The saddle's leather is cracked and torn. It is such a nice bike that I've been afraid to do anything to it (least of all ride it).

I'm curious as to how various restoration efforts affect a bike's value. Touching up the paint? Having the entire frame repainted/applying new decals? Recovering the saddle? Having the hubs built up to Open Pros?

Would a beautifully restored (resprayed, fresh decals) Super Record be worth more or less than a completely original one in so-so condition?

If you even touch up a bit of the paint, if it has original paint, you would lose about half of the value of the frame. Cables, brake hoods, mismatched rims and nasty saddle and bar tape are nothing to worry about. If you put Open pro's on the bike (or a new saddle), you will not get your money back. What size is it?
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Old 05-31-10, 05:09 PM
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If you want restore/repaint then flip it, no, you will come out behind or at best break even. If you want to keep and ride it, then do what you think suits your level of commitment and aesthetic.
I usually live with the paint chips, replace or clean the cool period parts, and wing it with less critical (to me) parts, such as tires, chains, etc.
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Old 05-31-10, 05:44 PM
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Originally Posted by anthony691 View Post
A year ago I purchased a Gios Torino Super Record at a flea market. It is a beautiful bike with a panto chainring, seatpost, and stem and Campy SR. A year later, it still has no brake cables, hoods, or barrel adjusters. The rims are mismatched. The bars are wrapped in filthy, ratty, red cloth tape. The saddle's leather is cracked and torn. It is such a nice bike that I've been afraid to do anything to it (least of all ride it).

I'm curious as to how various restoration efforts affect a bike's value. Touching up the paint? Having the entire frame repainted/applying new decals? Recovering the saddle? Having the hubs built up to Open Pros?

Would a beautifully restored (resprayed, fresh decals) Super Record be worth more or less than a completely original one in so-so condition?
First it helps to know what is going on with it as it is. For example:

As you state that it has pantographed parts, first, are they correct for the time the frame was made? Gios pantographing evolved, so first the panto should be time correct. If so great. If not sell it off and go sans panto, use the $ for regular parts which are also "correct".

There is a range of acceptable looks to paint and graphics. In general original even botched up graphics will have more value than fresh reproductions. As Gios transfers were not protected with clear, age and flaws are more tolerated. Gios had often thick brittle paint that chipped when hit and often left small deep blemishes. If you can get a good match, go, if not NO.

Assuming Campagnolo brakes, current production Campagnolo adjusters are made that look 90% the part, and function 100%. Or pay the big ebay price, on ebay sometimes Complete calipers go for less than adjusters! Buy new cables and housing, the original 1.8 mm cables are long gone, but the 1.6 mm cables do the job.

Hoods are less of a problem now, there are reproductions, but they are not cheap. They are longer lived than new aging stock. Or do like I did and look for Modolos or A'ME "ergo" hoods a modification from the day.

Recovering a saddle can be done, I have done it, the leather of the correct thickness is not cheap, there is some sewing required, peeling off the old cover is risky, gluing is a challenge and the result will have less actual value. Locate a better existing example. Saddle graphics can be recreated but not easily some were silk screened, some foil or hot stamped, all require set up costs that are not sensible for a one off.

Almost forgot about the rims, get a matching pair of Nisi's, tubular of course, of match to an existing Nisi. Other Italian rims accepted too.

Last edited by repechage; 05-31-10 at 05:45 PM. Reason: more infi
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Old 05-31-10, 06:34 PM
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Thank you all for the advice!

I have attached a photo of the bike. I apologize for the poor photo quality in advance.

The biggest chip in the paint is about .5" in diameter (On the downtube under the shifter because of the shifters being on backwards! At least I didn't do it!).

Does anyone recognize the saddle? There is writing on either side, but it is completely illegible.
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Old 05-31-10, 06:47 PM
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Very nice bike!



The pantographed chain rings are (correct) NR and not SR rings. Great looking original bike, around 1979 or 1980. Here is a picture from the '81 catalog. Notice the single difference (other than the wheelset and chain) :

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Old 05-31-10, 07:19 PM
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Very nice. Everyone has given you very good advice. The panto'd parts are difficult to source and are expensive if found. If keeping it to ride I would disassemble, clean the parts, clean and wax the frame, and purchase what is needed to complete the build, including matching rims. The hubs look like they match--are they campy high flange?

I think it may be a '78 - '79 model given the nutted brakes. In researching Gios Super Records (I have one myself) the best that I determined is that there were a couple changes made between '79 and '80. One was the change from nutted to recessed brakes, necessitating a change in the shape of the brake bridge (cylindrical to square center piece). Another apparent change was in the medallions in the fork crown-- Early versions say "Creazione Italia" while the later versions say "Creazioni Italia." (Has anyone else seen this?) What do your medallions say?

Stan

Last edited by retrofit; 05-31-10 at 07:58 PM.
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Old 05-31-10, 07:28 PM
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The hubs are matching Campy high flange.

My fork medallions read "Creazione Italia."

Thanks for more great information!
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Old 05-31-10, 07:41 PM
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Originally Posted by Picchio Special View Post
No - though it depends on the definition of so-so. The key element is that you're very unlikely to get your money out of a restoration - leave that to the next guy/gal.
Yeah - it will probably be worth more, but it will probably not be worth more than you spent.
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Old 05-31-10, 08:28 PM
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Originally Posted by anthony691 View Post
Thank you all for the advice!

I have attached a photo of the bike. I apologize for the poor photo quality in advance.

The biggest chip in the paint is about .5" in diameter (On the downtube under the shifter because of the shifters being on backwards! At least I didn't do it!).

Does anyone recognize the saddle? There is writing on either side, but it is completely illegible.
Saddle appears to be a Concor from this image. Remove the pump clip on the top tube, this bike was made to have a white frame fit Silca. Looks good from here, paint is not assessable from this shot, but at this point I would say no repaint. Matching this color is really hard for a full bike's worth, I am working on it. I am hoping the House of Color stuff will get me there for my project. You might be able to dye the saddle back to an acceptable color. I think this will be a terrific project when done. Document if fully before so you can remember what it was. And go with natural sidewall tires too. I would go bright non annodized rims, but that is my personal opinion.
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Old 05-31-10, 08:49 PM
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I haven't had an easy time deciding whether or not to keep the Gios (that's why my restoration efforts have been slow moving). I'm not sure that I would feel comfortable riding such a fancy bike.

My current bike has a rack and fenders, gets ridden 6k miles/year, and cost me $400 new. I find that it suits my needs excellently well. When checking out bikes, I often find myself thinking "it is a shame that it doesn't have clearance/braze-ons!" That said, I think if I could choose to own any C/V bike, it would probably be the Gios...
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