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Scored a Cinelli, but not what you'd think...

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Scored a Cinelli, but not what you'd think...

Old 08-09-10, 11:28 AM
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special_k
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Scored a Cinelli, but not what you'd think...

Just bought this Cinelli Rampachino in almost mint condition. I couldn't find much information on it, except it's the first Italian mountain bike, produced in 1985. I emailed Cinelli and they sent me an old catalogue page. (it's an adobe file and I'm not sure how to upload it here, so I'll just copy the text here)

Columbus CROMOR OR main tubes
chromoly unicrown fork
sloping top tube
Complete Shimano EXAGE 500 LX 21 speed group, featuring SIS hyperglide rear derailleur and STI system
Biopace crankset
Shimano EXAGE 500 LX headset
ARAYA VP20 rims, silver anodized
Grip tires 26X1.9
Chinelli chromoly stem
inner cable
Brooks for Cinelli saddle
Sizes: S (16.5"), M(18") , L(20")

Here are some pics:




Plans to turn it into a touring/randonneuring type of ride. Drops and barcons?
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Old 08-09-10, 11:34 AM
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ColonelJLloyd 
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Beautiful color.
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Old 08-09-10, 11:44 AM
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Originally Posted by special_k View Post
I couldn't find much information on it, except it's the first Italian mountain bike, produced in 1985.
The source of that claim is the Cinelli website. I find it questionable. The first Cinelli MTB, perhaps, but the first Italian MTB? Probably not. Mass-marketed, maybe.

-Kurt
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Old 08-09-10, 11:52 AM
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Its so pristene, I wouldn't change it at all.
Do you like mountain biking, do you already have a good off-road bike?
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Old 08-09-10, 12:34 PM
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Originally Posted by ColonelJLloyd View Post
Beautiful color.
I'd have to agree. It also came with a matching handlebar in the same colour.
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Old 08-09-10, 12:36 PM
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special_k
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Originally Posted by PDXaero View Post
Its so pristene, I wouldn't change it at all.
Do you like mountain biking, do you already have a good off-road bike?
I'm not much of a off-road person, but would like to do some light touring...
I'll definitely keep all the components together even if I do convert to drops.
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Old 08-09-10, 12:53 PM
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Looks like new! +1 on the color.
Just swapping on smooth tread tires transform these rigid hardtails to neat street rides. If you do go drop bar, then consider the overall length of reach you'll need. As MTBs tend to have long top tubes. Add a drop bar, you'll be stretched forward. I'd measure against one of your road bikes that is set up comfortably, and use that as a target....you may need a short stem.
Also, I don't know how available 7 spd SIS bar-ends would be. That is if you wish to preserve the indexing.
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Old 08-09-10, 01:47 PM
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I really don think that EXAGE 500 LX parts were being produced in 1985, even top of the line road bikes didnt have indexing 7-speed that early. This looks more like a bike from about 1990. If it has a chromor tube sticker it might actually be an itialian built bike but overall looks more like a mid/lower end generic tiawanese factory MTB that they slapped cinelli decals on in order to sell a few bikes at a low price point.

Note that 8-speed barcons will work fine with 7-speed casette, they share the same spacing but the shifters will have one extra unused "ghost" shift.
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Old 08-09-10, 03:01 PM
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there was a cinelli mtn. frame on craigslist in my area for awhile that was some generic old mtn frame that someone bought stickers for. the last going price i saw for it was $80.
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Old 08-09-10, 04:50 PM
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boy... you guys are making me nervous. Any way to tell if this is a real cinelli or not?
Here are more pics.



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Old 08-09-10, 05:02 PM
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Might as well be a 'real' Cinelli but it certainly isn't from 1985. They make some lower-end bikes these days, they may have in the past as well.

Exage 500 LX is a low-mid range (high low-range?) component group from the early '90s. XTR -> XT -> DX -> LX -> 500 LX.
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Old 08-09-10, 07:59 PM
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Nice shape!. Biopace was introduced about 1983 and was pretty much out by 1990. Seven speed shimano was introduced pretty early as well (1982?). Exage would push it toward the later end of that time frame. Look for a date code on the parts (the date code is probably a year older than the bike):



A 1976 2002 A January

B 1977 2003 B February

C 1978 2004 C March

D 1979 2005 D April

E 1980 E May

F 1981 F June

G 1982 G July

H 1983 H August

I 1984 I September

J 1985 J October

K 1986 K November

L 1987 L December

M 1988

N 1989

O 1990

P 1991

Q 1992

R 1993

S 1994

T 1995

U 1996

V 1997

W 1998

X 1999

Y 2000

Z 2001
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Old 08-09-10, 08:10 PM
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Originally Posted by cudak888 View Post
The source of that claim is the Cinelli website. I find it questionable. The first Cinelli MTB, perhaps, but the first Italian MTB? Probably not. Mass-marketed, maybe.

-Kurt
Cinelli WAS the first Italian company to offer a MTB in Italy. They named it a "Rampichino" or "little climber" and even trade-marked the name. Some of the bikes in teh range were very nice, while others were very forgettable. You have to remember that Campagnolo and other Italian companies did not believe in MTB's at all, so Cinelli's move was quite audacious.
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Old 08-10-10, 06:29 AM
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Originally Posted by WNG View Post
As MTBs tend to have long top tubes. Add a drop bar, you'll be stretched forward. I'd measure against one of your road bikes that is set up comfortably, and use that as a target....you may need a short stem.
+1 my experience exactly with a Stumpjumper conversion. Even with a fairly short stem, drop bars left me way too stretched so I went with a set of Porteur bars from Velo Orange.

OP - regarding authenticity - does the .pdf they sent have a picture, and if so, is it good enough to compare with your frame? That color seems like it would be fairly difficult to match.
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