Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Classic & Vintage
Reload this Page >

Vintage Trek confusion

Notices
Classic & Vintage This forum is to discuss the many aspects of classic and vintage bicycles, including musclebikes, lightweights, middleweights, hi-wheelers, bone-shakers, safety bikes and much more.

Vintage Trek confusion

Old 08-24-10, 07:13 PM
  #1  
jonwvara 
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
jonwvara's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Washington County, Vermont, USA
Posts: 3,579

Bikes: 1966 Dawes Double Blue, 1976 Raleigh Gran Sport, 1975 Raleigh Sprite 27, 1980 Univega Viva Sport, 1971 Gitane Tour de France, 1984 Lotus Classique, 1976 Motobecane Grand Record

Mentioned: 71 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 635 Post(s)
Liked 436 Times in 233 Posts
Vintage Trek confusion

The Vintage Trek site has me unsure whether I'm coming or going. According to the serial number list, a pre-1980 serial number starting with "G" indicates a TX700 or TX 770 model--no distinction as to which. There's also a posting on the site from someone who confidently asserts that their (very nice) bike that matches that serial number description is a 1977 TX700. Fine, but according to the Trek brochures on the site, they didn't make a TX700 in 1977--the catalog lists 702, 704, 705, and 706 (the 1978.5 brochure lists a 710 and a 730, but not a 700 or a 770. Which is correct--the brochure or the serial number list?
The site also says that Trek bikes didn't have model numbers painted on them until 1984, I think. So how do people know what they have if the serial numbers cover several models, supposedly, none of which are in the catalog? Just trying to figure out what I've got here. For that matter, what are the differences, if any, between all those vague 700-ish late-1970s Treks? The catalogs somehow neglect to mention whether they're touring bikes, hard-core road racers, or what. You'd think potential buyers might have found that information kind of, you know, useful
__________________
www.redclovercomponents.com

"Progress might have been all right once, but it has gone on too long."
--Ogden Nash

Last edited by jonwvara; 08-24-10 at 07:19 PM. Reason: add information
jonwvara is offline  
Old 08-24-10, 07:32 PM
  #2  
wrk101
Thrifty Bill
 
wrk101's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Mountains of Western NC
Posts: 23,164

Bikes: 86 Katakura Silk, 87 Prologue X2, 88 Cimarron LE, 1975 Sekai 4000 Professional, 73 Paramount, plus more

Mentioned: 88 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1101 Post(s)
Liked 613 Times in 437 Posts
If you talking to sellers, most of them just make it up. I rarely find a seller that correctly identifies the model and age of a bike, even when the model number is painted on it. So getting the name and age right is really up to you to determine. Take a couple of measurements and look at the original components (if they are still there) and you will know exactly what you have.


When a bike is for sale on C/L, if you pester the owner for additional pictures, details, etc., don't be surprised when they sell it to someone else. Most sellers want the "easiest" transaction.

On early Treks I have owned, the serial numbers showed the generic model, but not the specific build. So for instance, my 1980 Trek 412 serial number lists it as a Trek 410, when it is really a 412. There actually is not even a 410 listed in the catalog. I consider the serial number as identifying the bike as a 41x. And the build determines whether it is a 412 or a 414 (their two 410 series bikes that year).

If you are talking about a fellow lister, at times, I referred to my 1980 Trek 412 as a Trek 410.

As far as the vagueness, be sure to check the geometry page in the catalog. The 71x series is different than the 73x series.

Last edited by wrk101; 08-24-10 at 08:13 PM.
wrk101 is offline  
Old 08-24-10, 07:57 PM
  #3  
jonwvara 
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
jonwvara's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Washington County, Vermont, USA
Posts: 3,579

Bikes: 1966 Dawes Double Blue, 1976 Raleigh Gran Sport, 1975 Raleigh Sprite 27, 1980 Univega Viva Sport, 1971 Gitane Tour de France, 1984 Lotus Classique, 1976 Motobecane Grand Record

Mentioned: 71 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 635 Post(s)
Liked 436 Times in 233 Posts
Originally Posted by wrk101 View Post
If you talking to sellers, most of them just make it up. I rarely find a seller that correctly identifies the model and age of a bike, even when the model number is painted on it. So getting the name and age right is really up to you to determine. Take a couple of measurements and look at the original components (if they are still there) and you will know exactly what you have.


When a bike is for sale on C/L, if you pester the owner for additional pictures, details, etc., don't be surprised when they sell it to someone else. Most sellers want the "easiest" transaction.

On early Treks I have owned, the serial numbers showed the generic model, but not the specific build. So for instance, my 1980 Trek 412 serial number lists it as a Trek 410, when it is really a 412. There actually is not even a 410 listed in the catalog. I consider the serial number as identifying the bike as a 41x. And the build determines whether it is a 412 or a 414 (their two 410 series bikes that year).

If you are talking about a fellow lister, at times, I referred to my 1980 Trek 412 as a Trek 410.
Are you saying that a 410 and a 412, for example, use the same frame? Is that true across the board--for example, there's a generic 700 frame that was used on TX770s, TX700, 702s, 704s, 706s, etc. In other words, the first number refers to the frame, and the remaining digits to the specific build? And Trek never thought that information (or any information, apparently) was worth passing along to buyers? My head hurts.
__________________
www.redclovercomponents.com

"Progress might have been all right once, but it has gone on too long."
--Ogden Nash
jonwvara is offline  
Old 08-25-10, 02:22 PM
  #4  
jonwvara 
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
jonwvara's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Washington County, Vermont, USA
Posts: 3,579

Bikes: 1966 Dawes Double Blue, 1976 Raleigh Gran Sport, 1975 Raleigh Sprite 27, 1980 Univega Viva Sport, 1971 Gitane Tour de France, 1984 Lotus Classique, 1976 Motobecane Grand Record

Mentioned: 71 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 635 Post(s)
Liked 436 Times in 233 Posts
Bump.
Not trying to be a nuisance, but I can't believe there's not a vintage Trek authority here somewhere....
__________________
www.redclovercomponents.com

"Progress might have been all right once, but it has gone on too long."
--Ogden Nash
jonwvara is offline  
Old 08-25-10, 03:15 PM
  #5  
wrk101
Thrifty Bill
 
wrk101's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Mountains of Western NC
Posts: 23,164

Bikes: 86 Katakura Silk, 87 Prologue X2, 88 Cimarron LE, 1975 Sekai 4000 Professional, 73 Paramount, plus more

Mentioned: 88 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1101 Post(s)
Liked 613 Times in 437 Posts
I guess I don't understand your question. In the example I gave, 410 is the frame. There was no 410 bike. 412 and 414 were the bikes built with 410 frames (the exact same frame). Only difference is the components. If I look up the serial number, the only thing it tells me is that I have a 410 series frame. The components on the bike tell me whether I have the 412 or the 414.

Go to the spec page on the 1980 catalog for example.

They had several versions of the 500 series bike, based on components. So you have a 515, 516, a 517, and a 518. All the exact same frame (look up the serial number database for that year, the only 500 series bikes you will see are a 510). Then you have the 715, 716, 717, and 718 all sharing the 710 frame (thus only 710 frames were listed in the serial number database). Then the 735, 736, 737, 738, all sharing the 730 frame, then the 915, 916, 917, and 918 all sharing the 910 frame. Then the 935, 936, 937, and 938 all sharing the 930 frame.

In those early years, the serial number would just tell you the FRAME, not the ultimate build out. So once components got swapped, you really would never know which version of the 71x you might have (for example).

Sophisticated buyers back then would look at the geometry page, figure out which they wanted, then look at the build out page, and see which component group they wanted, and they were ready to go. I really wish it was still that way. So you could get whichever frame material (531, SL, or whatever) with your favorite component group. Pretty nice.

Before 1980, the serial numbers were more complicated. The vintage Trek site goes through the whole mess pretty well.



Like any catalog or brochure, they were printed in advance. All the bike companies had issues with brochures. My 1987 Schwinn Prologue for instance, does not show up in the 1987 catalog, even though the bike was made in February of 1987. It only starts to show up in the 1988 catalog. But the bike is clearly a 1987. And so it goes.

So people continue to date bikes through multiple means: catalogs, component date codes, serial numbers, colors, decals, etc. We are very lucky to have the wealth of information available on Trek bikes. Most vintage brands have sketchy to no information at all.
wrk101 is offline  
Old 08-25-10, 03:24 PM
  #6  
cinco
Senior Member
 
cinco's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Colorado
Posts: 569

Bikes: Forty of them

Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 99 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 27 Times in 18 Posts
Originally Posted by jonwvara View Post
Are you saying that a 410 and a 412, for example, use the same frame? Is that true across the board--for example, there's a generic 700 frame that was used on TX770s, TX700, 702s, 704s, 706s, etc. In other words, the first number refers to the frame, and the remaining digits to the specific build? And Trek never thought that information (or any information, apparently) was worth passing along to buyers? My head hurts.
The '77 catalog lists the the TX702, TX704, TX705, and TX706 as having the TX700 frame. Vintage-trek.com says that a TX700 frame built with Columbus tubing rather than Reynolds is a TX770.
cinco is offline  
Old 08-25-10, 04:12 PM
  #7  
wrk101
Thrifty Bill
 
wrk101's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Mountains of Western NC
Posts: 23,164

Bikes: 86 Katakura Silk, 87 Prologue X2, 88 Cimarron LE, 1975 Sekai 4000 Professional, 73 Paramount, plus more

Mentioned: 88 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1101 Post(s)
Liked 613 Times in 437 Posts
+1 First TWO numbers refer to the frame. Last number tells you the components. Of course, by now, many components may have been changed.

Trek just started business in the late 70s. All in all, they did pretty good for a new company. When you compare their catalogs from that era with Schwinn for example, the Trek supplied better info. And Schwinn by then had been in business for 75 years or more.

And many bike companies marketed their bikes for various segments, regardless of whether the bike was designed for it. I see so many vintage "touring" and "racing" bikes that are anything but. I love the term "Lite Weight" applied by many manufacturers back then to really porky bikes.

Here's Schwinn's 1977 description of their Varsity (38 pound bike): "Schwinn's most popular ten speed light weight style bicycle with features usually found on bicycles costing much more. The Varsity! Its durable quality Schwinn construction makes it a best buy that will last and last. The sleek, smooth lines of the diamond style carbon steel frame, and the tasteful use of chrome make the Varsity Sport deluxe in every respect. But the ride is what counts....and the improved ten speed gears make your ride an enjoyable trip....compare feature for feature....in it's class, it's a winner." Boy, that description really helped... Let's see: its durable, its a winner, it is deluxe in every respect...

Last edited by wrk101; 08-25-10 at 06:16 PM.
wrk101 is offline  
Old 08-25-10, 04:37 PM
  #8  
jonwvara 
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
jonwvara's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Washington County, Vermont, USA
Posts: 3,579

Bikes: 1966 Dawes Double Blue, 1976 Raleigh Gran Sport, 1975 Raleigh Sprite 27, 1980 Univega Viva Sport, 1971 Gitane Tour de France, 1984 Lotus Classique, 1976 Motobecane Grand Record

Mentioned: 71 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 635 Post(s)
Liked 436 Times in 233 Posts
Originally Posted by wrk101 View Post
I guess I don't understand your question.
I didn't understand why the both the TX700 and TX770 appear on the 1978 serial number list although neither appears in the 1978.5 catalog. Your answer was helpful, though--good point about catalogs printed up in advance not always matching reality on the ground.
I still wish the catalogs had said something about the intended function of the bikes. That seems like one of the basic functions of a catalog. I'm not enough of a wonk to look at a table of frame angles and deduce that for myself. Apparently their target market--at least in the late 70s--was composed entirely of wonks.
But if anyone can tell me anything about the ride quality of a 700 frame, I'd be happy to listen.
__________________
www.redclovercomponents.com

"Progress might have been all right once, but it has gone on too long."
--Ogden Nash
jonwvara is offline  
Old 08-25-10, 05:36 PM
  #9  
23skidoo
Gone World Hepster
 
23skidoo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Lincoln, NE
Posts: 1,272
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 4 Times in 3 Posts
So, is this all a theoretical discussion, or is there an actual bike at the heart of it? If so, how about some photos or the actual serial number to further focus the thread? I have several vintage Treks and it's important to remember that many of the frames were sold to local bike shops as bare frame and fork and it was up to the buyer or the ship to determine the component mix. One of my Ishiwata 0245 TX-300's was built with Rigida rims on Shimano hubs, Dia-Compe centerpull brakes, GB stem and bars, Suntour shifters, and Bridgestone-branded cranks by a Schwinn shop in Northfield, MN. My 510 came with Ishiwata 022 tubing but had Campy dropouts which were not supposed to be on 510's that year; it wasn't a factory build because it was pretty much all Dura-Ace 1st Generation black with a Crane RD.
23skidoo is offline  
Old 08-25-10, 05:39 PM
  #10  
MetinUz
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 957
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 34 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 8 Times in 7 Posts
Originally Posted by cinco View Post
The '77 catalog lists the the TX702, TX704, TX705, and TX706 as having the TX700 frame. Vintage-trek.com says that a TX700 frame built with Columbus tubing rather than Reynolds is a TX770.
I thought TX900 series were built with Columbus tubing, not TX700.
MetinUz is offline  
Old 08-25-10, 06:51 PM
  #11  
jonwvara 
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
jonwvara's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Washington County, Vermont, USA
Posts: 3,579

Bikes: 1966 Dawes Double Blue, 1976 Raleigh Gran Sport, 1975 Raleigh Sprite 27, 1980 Univega Viva Sport, 1971 Gitane Tour de France, 1984 Lotus Classique, 1976 Motobecane Grand Record

Mentioned: 71 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 635 Post(s)
Liked 436 Times in 233 Posts
Originally Posted by 23skidoo View Post
So, is this all a theoretical discussion, or is there an actual bike at the heart of it?
There is an actual bike, but I can't tell you much about it yet. Belongs to a co-worker of a friend over in Maine--he thinks it's a late-70s 700 (head badge said to be screwed on, not glued), but isn't sure. Trying to decide whether to pursue it.
__________________
www.redclovercomponents.com

"Progress might have been all right once, but it has gone on too long."
--Ogden Nash
jonwvara is offline  
Old 08-25-10, 07:45 PM
  #12  
auchencrow
Senior Member
 
auchencrow's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Detroit
Posts: 10,327
Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 17 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 15 Times in 13 Posts
Originally Posted by jonwvara View Post
There is an actual bike, but I can't tell you much about it yet. Belongs to a co-worker of a friend over in Maine--he thinks it's a late-70s 700 (head badge said to be screwed on, not glued), but isn't sure. Trying to decide whether to pursue it.
Pursuing any late 70's Trek 700-anything is advisable!
__________________
- Auchen
auchencrow is offline  
Old 08-25-10, 08:02 PM
  #13  
23skidoo
Gone World Hepster
 
23skidoo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Lincoln, NE
Posts: 1,272
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 4 Times in 3 Posts
^^^^what he said, listen to the man^^^^

I have TX-700 I purchased from gomango and it's full Reynolds 531 with Campy dropouts. I'm slowly compiling the 1st-gen black Dura Ace parts I need to finish up the build and am only lacking a headset, hubset, and brake levers to finish the build. I've got a very nice 27" wheelset with 1st-gen silver DA hubs, but those black hubs and components on a gold frame will really sparkle!! I've had three of my listed early Treks professionally repainted with full restoration decals and to me they're priceless, so even if the one you're looking at needs a full repaint you can enjoy the ride while saving up the $$$ to ship it off to Joe Bell or Chris Kvale or Matt Assenmacher or any of a number of great bike painters. If you haven't already done so, try to get the serial number and go from there. Has an asking price been mentioned?
23skidoo is offline  
Old 08-25-10, 10:09 PM
  #14  
cinco
Senior Member
 
cinco's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Colorado
Posts: 569

Bikes: Forty of them

Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 99 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 27 Times in 18 Posts
Originally Posted by MetinUz View Post
I thought TX900 series were built with Columbus tubing, not TX700.
Yes, the stock TX700 was Reynolds, but it was available as a special-order with Columbus, making it the TX770. The main differences between the TX770 and the TX900 are that the TX900 has less fork rake and shorter stays, as well as a fastback seatcluster and some different hand-finishing.

Believe it or not, I actually prefer the early Trek model system to what they started doing in the mid-'80s. "So wait, is the (Reynolds 531) 300-series better or worse than the 400-series, which used to be the bottom of the line?" Shades of Raleigh's model name shenanigans.
cinco is offline  
Old 08-25-10, 10:46 PM
  #15  
MetinUz
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 957
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 34 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 8 Times in 7 Posts
Originally Posted by cinco View Post
Yes, the stock TX700 was Reynolds, but it was available as a special-order with Columbus, making it the TX770. The main differences between the TX770 and the TX900 are that the TX900 has less fork rake and shorter stays, as well as a fastback seatcluster and some different hand-finishing.
These must be very rare. I own a TX900, and have owned a TX930, which sounds like the same thing as a TX770. I wonder if anyone has seen a Trek TX770 with some visual proof of Columbus tubing, such as a dove imprint on the steer tube. Maybe JohnDThompson could tell us...
MetinUz is offline  
Old 08-25-10, 11:31 PM
  #16  
GMS 
Bike Dealer since 1972
 
GMS's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Eastern North Carolina
Posts: 288

Bikes: Some of the bikes I've collected: Raleighs ( about 20), Trek ( oldest 1978 770 Columbus tubes), Mercian, Condor, Bob Jackson, Falcon, Holdsworth, Jacques Anquetil, Bianchi, LeMond, Cannondale, Schwinn, Iver Johnson, Dunelt

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 18 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 70 Times in 29 Posts
I have a Columbus frame with serial number starting G4E8. This decodes to TX700 or TX770 1978. The 1978 catalog shows only 9xx bike with Columbus.

From the Vintage Trek site
*** Several frames with a leading serial letter of G have been reported with Columbus tubing stickers. TX700 frames were available as special order, with Columbus tubing instead of the specified Reynolds 531. These bikes were designated as Model TX770.
GMS is offline  
Old 08-25-10, 11:47 PM
  #17  
MetinUz
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 957
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 34 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 8 Times in 7 Posts
Do you see any indication of Columbus tubing (other than the decal)? For instance, riffled steer tube, dove outline on the steerer, etc?
MetinUz is offline  
Old 08-26-10, 05:18 AM
  #18  
jonwvara 
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
jonwvara's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Washington County, Vermont, USA
Posts: 3,579

Bikes: 1966 Dawes Double Blue, 1976 Raleigh Gran Sport, 1975 Raleigh Sprite 27, 1980 Univega Viva Sport, 1971 Gitane Tour de France, 1984 Lotus Classique, 1976 Motobecane Grand Record

Mentioned: 71 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 635 Post(s)
Liked 436 Times in 233 Posts
Originally Posted by 23skidoo View Post
...Joe Bell or Chris Kvale or Matt Assenmacher or any of a number of great bike painters.
Not to hijack my own thread, but I'm not sure I'd lump all three of those guys together. I'm still smarting over the paint job Matt Assenmacher did on my 1970 TDF. The paint itself isn't bad, actually, but it really bothers me that he put the wrong Reynolds decals on it. Took him the better part of a year to do the job and get it back to me, too.

No price has been mentioned for the possibly-a-700 in Maine, but the guy seems to have an idea that it's pretty valuable--maybe an exaggerated idea. I'll look into it.
__________________
www.redclovercomponents.com

"Progress might have been all right once, but it has gone on too long."
--Ogden Nash

Last edited by jonwvara; 08-26-10 at 07:15 AM. Reason: fix misspelling
jonwvara is offline  
Old 08-26-10, 07:03 AM
  #19  
Bianchigirll 
Bianchi Goddess
 
Bianchigirll's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Shady Pines Retirement Fort Wayne, In
Posts: 28,410

Bikes: Too many to list here check my signature.

Mentioned: 157 Post(s)
Tagged: 2 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2366 Post(s)
Liked 1,440 Times in 847 Posts
Originally Posted by jonwvara View Post
Are you saying that a 410 and a 412, for example, use the same frame? Is that true across the board--for example, there's a generic 700 frame that was used on TX770s, TX700, 702s, 704s, 706s, etc. In other words, the first number refers to the frame, and the remaining digits to the specific build? And Trek never thought that information (or any information, apparently) was worth passing along to buyers? My head hurts.

actually using the same frame across several models is quite common even today. it is hard to offer 12 or roadbikes with price points maybe $75 apart and have all the frames different. having a frame for you 400 seris bikes and then another for your 600 series make great economical sense

Bianchi commonly used the same frame, like their Formula tube bikes, across 4 or more models. then you change the component and wheel package to make you price points.
__________________
One morning you wake up, the girl is gone, the bikes are gone, all that's left behind is a pair of old tires and a tube of tubular glue, all squeezed out"

Sugar "Kane" Kowalczyk
Bianchigirll is offline  
Old 08-26-10, 10:34 AM
  #20  
JohnDThompson 
Old fart
 
JohnDThompson's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Appleton WI
Posts: 23,650

Bikes: Several, mostly not name brands.

Mentioned: 142 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3003 Post(s)
Liked 2,110 Times in 1,255 Posts
Originally Posted by jonwvara View Post
what are the differences, if any, between all those vague 700-ish late-1970s Treks? The catalogs somehow neglect to mention whether they're touring bikes, hard-core road racers, or what. You'd think potential buyers might have found that information kind of, you know, useful
700 and 710 were the same frame sport-touring geometry. 730 had shorter chainstays for "racier" performance. 770 was similar to the 730, but has fastback style seatstay attachment; the others attached the seatstays on the sides of the seat lug.

HTH...
JohnDThompson is offline  
Old 08-26-10, 10:37 AM
  #21  
JohnDThompson 
Old fart
 
JohnDThompson's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Appleton WI
Posts: 23,650

Bikes: Several, mostly not name brands.

Mentioned: 142 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3003 Post(s)
Liked 2,110 Times in 1,255 Posts
Originally Posted by cinco View Post
Vintage-trek.com says that a TX700 frame built with Columbus tubing rather than Reynolds is a TX770.
No; 7nn refers to Reynolds 531. 9nn refers to Columbus (SL for 58cm and smaller; SP for larger frames).

Last edited by JohnDThompson; 08-26-10 at 10:43 AM.
JohnDThompson is offline  
Old 08-26-10, 11:13 AM
  #22  
jonwvara 
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
jonwvara's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Washington County, Vermont, USA
Posts: 3,579

Bikes: 1966 Dawes Double Blue, 1976 Raleigh Gran Sport, 1975 Raleigh Sprite 27, 1980 Univega Viva Sport, 1971 Gitane Tour de France, 1984 Lotus Classique, 1976 Motobecane Grand Record

Mentioned: 71 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 635 Post(s)
Liked 436 Times in 233 Posts
Originally Posted by JohnDThompson View Post
700 and 710 were the same frame sport-touring geometry. 730 had shorter chainstays for "racier" performance. 770 was similar to the 730, but has fastback style seatstay attachment; the others attached the seatstays on the sides of the seat lug.

HTH...
Sport touring geometry! Aha! The information has finally leaked out despite Trek's 30+ year effort to keep it a secret! Thank you John D., with exclamation points and a clash of cybals!
__________________
www.redclovercomponents.com

"Progress might have been all right once, but it has gone on too long."
--Ogden Nash
jonwvara is offline  
Related Topics
Thread
Thread Starter
Forum
Replies
Last Post
Bruce27
Classic & Vintage
11
05-15-20 06:54 PM
thrasher9905
Classic & Vintage
11
10-09-19 12:40 PM
Bike Wolf
Classic and Vintage Bicycles: Whats it Worth? Appraisals.
9
12-17-16 04:57 PM
roger18
Classic and Vintage Bicycles: Whats it Worth? Appraisals.
13
11-16-15 08:28 PM
hunter12
Classic & Vintage
13
09-25-12 05:18 AM

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.