Classic & Vintage This forum is to discuss the many aspects of classic and vintage bicycles, including musclebikes, lightweights, middleweights, hi-wheelers, bone-shakers, safety bikes and much more.

Tire inflation????

Old 08-26-10, 11:33 AM
  #1  
big chainring 
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Wilmette, IL
Posts: 6,468
Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 395 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 18 Times in 14 Posts
Tire inflation????

OK, so I went from sew-ups to clinchers recently. I flat spotted my rear wheel on my tubular set-up and decided to go with a pair of clinchers that I have. I was able to get a pair of Vredestein Rocorso tires at a bargain price at Performance. The ride was horrible! Like riding solid tires or something. I rode them inflated to 100psi.

Last night I went out riding and didnt want to deal with topping of the tires, it had been about three weeks since I inflated them, so I was probably at 75-80 psi. Great ride! Didnt think that I was hindered by underinflated tires. Maybe 80-85 psi is plenty. I thought new clinchers were capable of 120 psi plus.

Any thoughts. What is typical inflation when you ride?
big chainring is online now  
Old 08-26-10, 11:42 AM
  #2  
ColonelJLloyd 
Senior Member
 
ColonelJLloyd's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Louisville
Posts: 8,371
Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 106 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
700c x 28mm Ruffy Tuffys. ~80 psi
ColonelJLloyd is offline  
Old 08-26-10, 11:44 AM
  #3  
10 Wheels
Galveston County Texas
 
10 Wheels's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: In The Wind
Posts: 30,981

Bikes: 2010 Expedition, 03 GTO

Mentioned: 15 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 709 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
700 X 28's rated for 130 psi. Front 100, rear 110
__________________
Fred "The Real Fred"
10 Wheels is offline  
Old 08-26-10, 11:54 AM
  #4  
Ex Pres
#39
 
Ex Pres's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Mountain Brook, AL
Posts: 7,122
Mentioned: 23 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 345 Post(s)
Liked 7 Times in 6 Posts
There's a nice chart out there that shows the PSI you should be using in each tire vs. your weight, graphed by tire width.

But if I tried to ride my 23's @ 80psi and my weight I'd definitely notice. On 28's, not a problem. 100 might be too high. I usually run about 115 front, 120 rear, but it varies by the brand of tire, and clicher v. tubular. Better tires [usually] = better ride at higher pressure.
Ex Pres is offline  
Old 08-26-10, 12:11 PM
  #5  
prettyshady
12345
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: south france
Posts: 1,248
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I have never pumped a tyre above 80psi, I always get scared.
I really need to get over this problem soon!
prettyshady is offline  
Old 08-26-10, 12:33 PM
  #6  
bobbycorno
Senior Member
 
bobbycorno's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 2,543
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by prettyshady View Post
I have never pumped a tyre above 80psi, I always get scared.
I really need to get over this problem soon!
Why??? What advantage is there to overinflating your tires?

SP
Bend, OR

...running my 700x35c Paselas at 50&60 psi (and I weigh 185lb)
bobbycorno is offline  
Old 08-26-10, 12:50 PM
  #7  
scozim 
Ellensburg, WA
 
scozim's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Ellensburg, WA
Posts: 3,394

Bikes: See my signature

Mentioned: 56 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 186 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Originally Posted by Ex Pres View Post
There's a nice chart out there that shows the PSI you should be using in each tire vs. your weight, graphed by tire width.

But if I tried to ride my 23's @ 80psi and my weight I'd definitely notice. On 28's, not a problem. 100 might be too high. I usually run about 115 front, 120 rear, but it varies by the brand of tire, and clicher v. tubular. Better tires [usually] = better ride at higher pressure.
I ride about the same pressure - 115 - 118 front and 120 rear with both tubular and clincher. The clinchers are definitely a tougher ride. On the bikes with 27" wheels I'm normally 90-100 psi.
__________________
1984 Gitane Sprint; 1984 Gitane Tour de France; 1982 Trek 610; 1968 Peugeot PL8; 1982 Nishiki Marina 12; 1972 Peugeot PX-10; 1987 Trek 800 Antelope (touring/commuting set up); 1993 Trek 950 mtb; 1997 Klein Pulse Comp mtb; 1989 Peugeot Limestone hybrid (for touring); 1975 Gitane Olympic; 1983 Vitus 979; 1989 Spectrum Titanium:
scozim is offline  
Old 08-26-10, 01:01 PM
  #8  
OldRoadman
Senior Member
 
OldRoadman's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Menomonee Falls, Wi.
Posts: 196

Bikes: 82 Trek 613 Sport Touring, 84 Lotus Classique

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
I'm riding Michelin City 28mm tires. The inflation range is 57-87 lbs. I'm 220 lbs. and the best riding is between 70-80 lbs.
OldRoadman is offline  
Old 08-26-10, 01:15 PM
  #9  
Ex Pres
#39
 
Ex Pres's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Mountain Brook, AL
Posts: 7,122
Mentioned: 23 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 345 Post(s)
Liked 7 Times in 6 Posts
Here's a link to a chart very similar to the one I refered to in post #4. Note that it's weight per wheel, and add the bike's weight to your weight.
Ex Pres is offline  
Old 08-26-10, 01:33 PM
  #10  
kuso
Senior Member
 
kuso's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: winnipeg
Posts: 220
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts

A nice guide came with my michelin pro 3 race tires.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg
michelin7..jpg (71.0 KB, 20 views)
kuso is offline  
Old 08-26-10, 01:41 PM
  #11  
Zaphod Beeblebrox 
PanGalacticGargleBlaster
 
Zaphod Beeblebrox's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Smugglers Notch, Vermont
Posts: 7,536

Bikes: Upright and Recumbent....too many to list, mostly Vintage.

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 17 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
From another Bicycle Quarterly article:

Wider Tires Are Faster
In theory, wider tires offer better performance. Their contact patch is wider and shorter, thus requiring less tire deformation as the wheel rotates. However, the casings of wider tires endure greater stresses, and a wider tire requires a sturdier, less supple casing. Such a casing requires more energy to deform, and the net result often is a tire that is slower. An alternative to sturdier casings is running the wider tires at lower pressures. This solution has been adopted by some track riders, who run their 25mm tires at 10 bar (150 psi) instead of the 14 bar (200 psi) used for narrower track tires. Our real-road tests have
confirmed that very high pressures offer no significant performance benefits. However, harder tires feel faster, probably because they transmit a higher frequency of vibrations, which riders associate with higher speeds. This appears to be the reason why performance riders have gravitated toward narrower tires time and again over the history of the bicycle.

Beyond performance, wider tires allow and even encourage cyclists to ride on more scenic backroads with less traffic. They also provide better cornering adhesion, because they put more rubber on the road. (Racing cars also use wide tires to improve cornering adhesion.) On bumpy roads, the lower pressures of wider tires improve cornering adhesion further by preventing the wheel from losing contact with the road surface.
__________________
--Don't Panic.
Zaphod Beeblebrox is offline  
Related Topics
Thread
Thread Starter
Forum
Replies
Last Post
spectastic
Bicycle Mechanics
4
07-05-19 06:39 PM
superduper54
Singlespeed & Fixed Gear
8
07-03-09 01:48 PM
alwaysbefirst
Road Cycling
1
07-25-05 03:26 PM
jeff williams
Mountain Biking
0
01-12-05 09:26 PM

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

Copyright 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.