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Probably the wrong forum, but can anyone advise on titanium to titanium contact?

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Probably the wrong forum, but can anyone advise on titanium to titanium contact?

Old 09-01-10, 07:11 AM
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KonAaron Snake 
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Probably the wrong forum, but can anyone advise on titanium to titanium contact?

I know this isn't the ideal forum, but I also know that there are folks here who will be able to answer. I just switched to a titanium seatpost in my titanium bike and I was wondering if ti has bonding issues like aluminum to aluminum and steel to steel. Do I need to add anything (google searches seem to indicate I do) and if so, how frequently? I think a lot of this sort of advice is given by people who want to sell a product so I wanted to ask here before trusting it.
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Old 09-01-10, 07:13 AM
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Anti-seize compound should work just fine.
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Old 09-01-10, 07:19 AM
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I believe the copper never size works the best. Roger
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Old 09-01-10, 07:24 AM
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How often do I need to reapply?
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Old 09-01-10, 07:37 AM
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Originally Posted by KonAaron Snake View Post
How often do I need to reapply?
Practically never. Any significant application of any grease will have the intended results for a lifetime, unless you live on an ocean coast and leave it outside, but then you'll wish you would have dipped the every piece in grease; not for the titanium, but for all the other aluminum components and steel fasteners.
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Old 09-01-10, 07:50 AM
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PERFECT...thanks for the help. Sites I was looking at were talking about monthly and annual treatments...which did not make sense.

Also...for those who complain about the old Campy two bolt NR post, the Moots post I just installed was about 10x worse and more frustrating. I don't know who designed this thing, but man it's a nightmare to get a saddle in there. On the plus side, once it;s in, the adjustability is fantastic.
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Old 09-01-10, 08:24 AM
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Originally Posted by KonAaron Snake View Post
PERFECT...thanks for the help. Sites I was looking at were talking about monthly and annual treatments...which did not make sense.

Also...for those who complain about the old Campy two bolt NR post, the Moots post I just installed was about 10x worse and more frustrating. I don't know who designed this thing, but man it's a nightmare to get a saddle in there. On the plus side, once it;s in, the adjustability is fantastic.
Did you use the post that has the screws on the back of the clamp? You need a stem spreader for those, it makes life so much easier.
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Old 09-01-10, 08:29 AM
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It does have screws on the back...it has a hollow circle enclosure on the top with two plates that hold the rails inside of it. I'll try and take a photo later, but it was a serious nightmare...took at least half an hour. I eventually pried the rail section open on one side and tapped with a hammer until it slid in.
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Old 09-01-10, 08:31 AM
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Yup, definitely need a stem spreader. I also find that they make putting on quill stems very easy as well.

You'll be happy with your MOOTS quality, I swear. I just hope you didn't buy it from their site.
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Old 09-01-10, 08:38 AM
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Originally Posted by DRietz View Post
Yup, definitely need a stem spreader. I also find that they make putting on quill stems very easy as well.

You'll be happy with your MOOTS quality, I swear. I just hope you didn't buy it from their site.
Nahhh...bought it used. Still outrageously priced...sort of an impulse buy and I really already regret it a bit.
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Old 09-01-10, 08:53 AM
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Notes on greasing contact sufaces:
Due to the proliferation of recommendations by gleaned from professional team mechanics who are paid to scrupulously inspect/maintain team bikes, there's a lot of maintenance overkill out there, but precautions to limit typical/galvanic corrosion is too simple to be discouraged.
For instance, nitro-burning top fuel drag race engines are rebuilt by their mechanics between runs, because their livelyhood is on the line if an unobserved bearing is spun, cylinder is scratched, or a rod is bent.
We'd all like to inspect and monitor wear of everything and anything mechanical, but it gets to a point of excessive impracticality very quickly. Your vehicle engine would love to have a continual supply of virgin oil, but it would be excessive and obsessive to even attempt to clean out the dirty residual oil that doesn't drain due to surface tension (which immediate "contaminates" the fresh oil after an oil change).
Keep in mind, the alloys of mating metal parts would need to be precisely identical to eliminate galvanic corrosion, so, unless you could verify the alloy content in your titanium seatpost exactly matches the alloy content of the seat tube. Greasing mating surfaces is cheap insurance; greasing them often is still cheap, just unnecessary and borderline obsessive for most of us not priveledged to hire a full-time mechanic.
If, however, you switch to a carbon-fiber seatpost, ask the manufacturer what they recommend since their chosen epoxy and/or carbon compound may be gradually degraded by components of conventional (hydrocarbon) greases. C&V owners have it easy; obsolete replacement parts notwithstanding.
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Old 09-01-10, 08:54 AM
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Hmmm. I've used ti fasteners into ti parts for years without any type of anti-seize. And certainly none was recommended by the manufacturer.
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Old 09-01-10, 10:44 AM
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When I worked for a certain importer of cheap chinese Ti frames, we recommended Finish Line "Ti-Prep" when doing a Ti post in a Ti frame. Also to remove the seatpost at least once a year. Of course they also sold dented and misaligned frames at full price, so it's possible they didn't know anything.
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Old 09-01-10, 11:18 AM
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I'm so glad I have the ti frame I have...I'm of the biased opinion that it doesn't get much better than a Mass. produced Merlin.

I still remember the first time I rode one...it was magical. Owning one has been one of life's few nostalgia/major expectations that hasn't disappointed at all.
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Old 09-01-10, 11:45 AM
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As an aside: I work with the sister of Mike Augsperger, one of the founders of Merlin. He's now creating some very cool hand-powered, off-road titanium cycles for disabled riders. Check it out if you are interested:

https://www.oneoffhandcycle.com/

https://www.titaniumarts.com/

P.s. I always coveted a Merlin frame. As a teenager, I worked delivering pizzas. I saved up for a long time until I finally could afford a Merlin frame, but then couldn't pull the trigger. The $1700 or $1800 for a frame (or whatever it was they cost at the time) was simply too much for me as a 17 year old to blow at one time for something I didn't actually need, but I still lust after them.
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Old 09-01-10, 11:57 AM
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That is seriously cool! I know that Merlin did a lot of wheel chairs and specialty devices for the disabled when they first started.
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Old 09-01-10, 02:31 PM
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Originally Posted by over1 View Post
Greasing mating surfaces is cheap insurance; greasing them often is still cheap, just unnecessary and borderline obsessive for most of us not priveledged to hire a full-time mechanic.
Just wish to clarify for anyone reading this thread looking for ALU-to-steel info:

Greasing mating surfaces of aluminum to steel (seatposts, stems, pivot bolts, etc) is an absolute requirement.

-Kurt
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Old 09-01-10, 04:10 PM
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Look at https://www.neverseezproducts.com/antiseize.htm or browse the Henkel/Loctite website.

Different composition of antiseize for different metals and environments. Copper and nickel seem to be preferred in some, and to be avoided in others. Some are moly-based compounds. Some are made for nuclear power plans!

Look at the manufacturer's directions. Bike shops have some antiseize from Park or other makers; auto parts stores have others. Most common stuff is from Permatex or Loctite.

I've used the silver antiseize for decades (steel to aluminum). Far superior to any grease for sleeve-fit stuff like stems and seatposts, and superb on threaded parts you rarely undo, but will need to change eventually (freewheels and pedals spindles to cranks).
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Old 09-01-10, 04:54 PM
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Originally Posted by JML View Post
I've used the silver antiseize for decades (steel to aluminum). Far superior to any grease for sleeve-fit stuff like stems and seatposts, and superb on threaded parts you rarely undo, but will need to change eventually (freewheels and pedals spindles to cranks).
It's good for threads, but I don't concur regarding seatposts or stems. It's far too slippery. I used it for a year and gave up.

-Kurt
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Old 09-01-10, 11:59 PM
  #20  
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Originally Posted by cudak888 View Post
Just wish to clarify for anyone reading this thread looking for ALU-to-steel info:

Greasing mating surfaces of aluminum to steel (seatposts, stems, pivot bolts, etc) is an absolute requirement.

-Kurt
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