Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Classic & Vintage This forum is to discuss the many aspects of classic and vintage bicycles, including musclebikes, lightweights, middleweights, hi-wheelers, bone-shakers, safety bikes and much more.

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 07-29-14, 05:52 PM   #101
Shinkers 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Utah
Bikes: '88 Trek 1200, '91 Trek 1400
Posts: 631
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 80 Post(s)
Okay, sorry I have one more dumb question then I'll stop!

Is rubbing alcohol okay to use on raw aluminum just for general cleaning? I had a couple of marks on it (for placing a decal) and then wiped the marks off with rubbing alcohol.

Thanks.
Shinkers is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-29-14, 08:37 PM   #102
Jeff Wills
Insane Bicycle Mechanic
 
Jeff Wills's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: other Vancouver
Bikes:
Posts: 8,365
Mentioned: 13 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 200 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shinkers View Post
Okay, sorry I have one more dumb question then I'll stop!

Is rubbing alcohol okay to use on raw aluminum just for general cleaning? I had a couple of marks on it (for placing a decal) and then wiped the marks off with rubbing alcohol.

Thanks.
Yes.
__________________
Jeff Wills

Comcast nuked my web page. It will return soon..
Jeff Wills is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-29-14, 08:42 PM   #103
Jeff Wills
Insane Bicycle Mechanic
 
Jeff Wills's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: other Vancouver
Bikes:
Posts: 8,365
Mentioned: 13 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 200 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shinkers View Post
Okay, here's another question. Since my frame is already brushed aluminum., what would the effect of only Mothers polish be do you think?

Not much. Maybe make a little shinier. If it's "brushed" , you need to work up to "polished" in stages. That means progressively finer grits. If you want to attack it, go to the local auto parts store and get some red rubbing compound and white polishing compound. Go after your frame with the red first. Use lots of rags- old t-shirts work well. Expect to make a mess. Follow the red with the white. Expect more mess. Follow the white with the Mothers. Expect to be locked out of the house because of the mess you made. You'll be homeless, but your bike will be shiny.
__________________
Jeff Wills

Comcast nuked my web page. It will return soon..
Jeff Wills is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-29-14, 10:07 PM   #104
gaucho777
Senior Member
 
gaucho777's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Berkeley, CA
Bikes: '72 Cilo Pacer • '72 Peugeot PX10 • '73 Speedwell Ti • '74 Nishiki Competition • '74 Peugeot UE-8 • '86 Look Equipe 753 • '86 Look KG86 • '89 Parkpre Team Road • '90 Parkpre Team MTB • '90 Merlin
Posts: 6,044
Mentioned: 32 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 262 Post(s)
^ these help with the mess:
Amazon.com: Gojo 1432 Large Hi-Tactile Glove: Automotive

You can usually find something similar at auto parts stores. I wouldn't pay more than $8 though. (Retail price is listed at $28!?, but on sale for $7.47.) Not long ago I got a 6-pack of the Gojo Hi Tactile gloves linked above from my local Costco for a ridiculously low price, but their inventory changes frequently. Highly recommended for polishing work.

Last edited by gaucho777; 07-29-14 at 10:12 PM.
gaucho777 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-25-15, 09:55 PM   #105
Senior Ryder 00
Old bikes, Older guy
 
Senior Ryder 00's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: Left Coast USA - Oregon
Bikes: A few modern, Several vintage, All ridden when weather allows.
Posts: 273
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 37 Post(s)
I realize that this is an old and ongoing post, but I just had to comment on how well this process works. I've done a pair of hubs, a rim and a crankset. While now show car quality, they certainly look great an a refurbished bike.
Senior Ryder 00 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-16, 12:43 PM   #106
bikemig 
Senior Member
 
bikemig's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Middle Earth (aka IA)
Bikes: A bunch of old bikes and a few new ones
Posts: 13,048
Mentioned: 58 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2541 Post(s)
This is a great thread,
bikemig is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-24-16, 02:03 AM   #107
Michael Angelo 
Senior Member
 
Michael Angelo's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Hurricane Alley , Florida
Bikes: Treks (USA), Schwinn Paramount, Schwinn letour,Raleigh Team Professional, Gazelle GoldLine Racing, 2 Super Mondias, Carlton Professional.
Posts: 3,874
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 54 Post(s)
Just used this again
Michael Angelo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-24-16, 09:59 AM   #108
ApolloSoyuz1975
Senior Member
 
ApolloSoyuz1975's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: NW Ohio flatlander
Bikes: Cannondale SR400 (3.0). Phat t00bs!
Posts: 196
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 42 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeff Wills View Post
Not much. Maybe make a little shinier. If it's "brushed" , you need to work up to "polished" in stages. That means progressively finer grits. If you want to attack it, go to the local auto parts store and get some red rubbing compound and white polishing compound. Go after your frame with the red first. Use lots of rags- old t-shirts work well. Expect to make a mess. Follow the red with the white. Expect more mess. Follow the white with the Mothers. Expect to be locked out of the house because of the mess you made. You'll be homeless, but your bike will be shiny.
Since this is a necro-bump, someone may as well quote the best post in the thread.
ApolloSoyuz1975 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-27-17, 09:34 AM   #109
specialmonkey
Fillet-Brazed Member
 
specialmonkey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: Brooklyn, New York
Bikes: ⊕
Posts: 163
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 62 Post(s)
Another Bump

I was referred to this thread and had some pretty good luck starting on these Specialites T.A. Pro 5 Vis cranks. Thanks so much for the details. Does anyone know the best place to acquire Norton Black Ice Waterproof Sandpaper? Amazon has 50-sheet packs, it's $40-50 each, I might want a bit less, maybe 25 sheets, but more than 5 or 10.





More here: https://www.flickr.com/photos/specia...57681452632972
specialmonkey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-27-17, 09:53 AM   #110
Salamandrine 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: Los Angeles
Bikes: 78 Masi Criterium, 68 PX10, 2016 Mercian King of Mercia, Rivendell Clem Smith Jr
Posts: 2,948
Mentioned: 47 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 845 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by specialmonkey View Post
I was referred to this thread and had some pretty good luck starting on these Specialites T.A. Pro 5 Vis cranks. Thanks so much for the details. Does anyone know the best place to acquire Norton Black Ice Waterproof Sandpaper? Amazon has 50-sheet packs, it's $40-50 each, I might want a bit less, maybe 25 sheets, but more than 5 or 10.
Try an auto parts store. They will always have wet or dry sandpaper of one brand or another. Is there some particular reason you want Norton "Black Ice"?
Salamandrine is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-27-17, 10:04 AM   #111
Salamandrine 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: Los Angeles
Bikes: 78 Masi Criterium, 68 PX10, 2016 Mercian King of Mercia, Rivendell Clem Smith Jr
Posts: 2,948
Mentioned: 47 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 845 Post(s)
As long as this thread is bumped, this might be a good time to point out that there are several competing sandpaper numbering systems. For wet or dry papers, these days they are usually graded on the European P scale. For practical purposes, this can usually be assumed with wet or dry finishing paper, but not always. The old US system was CAMI, which is similar in the lower grades, and is still used. Micromesh has their own system which is totally different than everyone else's.

Look here for conversion.

Last edited by Salamandrine; 05-27-17 at 10:08 AM.
Salamandrine is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-27-17, 10:15 AM   #112
specialmonkey
Fillet-Brazed Member
 
specialmonkey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: Brooklyn, New York
Bikes: ⊕
Posts: 163
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 62 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Salamandrine View Post
Try an auto parts store. They will always have wet or dry sandpaper of one brand or another. Is there some particular reason you want Norton "Black Ice"?

Thanks for the info.

I like the way it sounds

Just kidding, it's what the author recommended on page 3.

I have used normal wet dry "SandWet" Norton 220 recently, and it's pretty good.

I'm going on the author's recommendation. I think Norton is trusted in the automotive industry.



Quote:
Originally Posted by khatfull View Post

As of late I’ve become absolutely SOLD on Norton Black Ice waterproof sandpaper. I simply love the stuff. It lasts a VERY long time, it sands beautifully, and cuts fast:

You’ll probably need to find a local auto paint/finishing store to find this…or online. This paper will not be a typical big box store or hardware store item. It is more expensive, be prepared, but I honestly don’t think there’s a comparison between this and the other papers I've used.

For sanding out flaws I’ve been using the 320 grit Black Ice paper and the Norton dual density sanding pad:


Once the flaws are gone, or as gone as I dare make them, I switch to the new grit progression I use since using the Black Ice paper: 600, 1200, 2500. Yep, three grades. I can’t do this with paper other than the Black Ice because of how evenly and quickly it cuts. Wet sanded of course.

I’ll use the sanding pad with the 600 but the 1200 and 2500 I’ll use by hand. The 1200 and 2500 when wet become very flexible, it’s almost like wiping the part with an abrasive rag. The 2500 especially. Regarding the 2500 grit. If you take enough time with it this could be your final finish. The more time you take with it the less you'll take with your polish.
specialmonkey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-27-17, 10:38 AM   #113
Salamandrine 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: Los Angeles
Bikes: 78 Masi Criterium, 68 PX10, 2016 Mercian King of Mercia, Rivendell Clem Smith Jr
Posts: 2,948
Mentioned: 47 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 845 Post(s)
Oh, i see. Clearly I missed that post.

Seems to me that Black Ice is most likely Norton's answer to Micromesh. IOW a super premium sandpaper. I haven't used it. FWIW Rockler stocks Micromesh. Frankly for something like this it isn't that critical, IMO. 3M, Norton, Mirka - they all seem about the same to me. Good tools do save time though.

I rarely sand higher than P1000 when polishing aluminum - if sanding is necessary. Unlike with lacquer, fine sanding scratches on aluminum will polish out easily once you get to the compound.
Salamandrine is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-27-17, 11:56 PM   #114
Wildwood
Senior Member
 
Wildwood's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Seattle area
Bikes: Bikes??? Thought this was social media?!?
Posts: 6,034
Mentioned: 80 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 805 Post(s)
I always love to see this thread come around.
Then I never practice the lesson on seatposts, handlebars, crank arms, etc.

come back @KHAtful
Wildwood is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-28-17, 09:05 AM   #115
Centaurious
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Pensacola FL
Bikes: 1984 Raleigh Kodiak , KHS Sierra Something
Posts: 134
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
Something I have used for polishing small parts is a 4-way nail buffer for doing finger nails. The one I use looks like a flat 2 blade propeller with Emery and 3 buffing pads. Their cheap and available in grocery or drug stores.

I just used one to polish the spindle on a Micrometer I was servicing and thought I would share.
Centaurious is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-29-17, 11:35 AM   #116
specialmonkey
Fillet-Brazed Member
 
specialmonkey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: Brooklyn, New York
Bikes: ⊕
Posts: 163
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 62 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wildwood View Post
I always love to see this thread come around.
Then I never practice the lesson on seatposts, handlebars, crank arms, etc.

come back @KHAtful
It's not too late to turn your hands metallic gray and make your parts shine. Get some sand paper and Mothers!
specialmonkey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-29-17, 11:40 AM   #117
Wildwood
Senior Member
 
Wildwood's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Seattle area
Bikes: Bikes??? Thought this was social media?!?
Posts: 6,034
Mentioned: 80 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 805 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by specialmonkey View Post
It's not too late to turn your hands metallic gray and make your parts shine. Get some sand paper and Mothers!

Next winter - summer has arrived in the PacificMoistWest - I have new tires to wear out first before worrying about polishing.
Wildwood is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-07-17, 03:11 PM   #118
khatfull
FBoD Member at Large
Thread Starter
 
khatfull's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Woodbury, MN
Bikes:
Posts: 6,246
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 27 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wildwood View Post
I always love to see this thread come around.
Then I never practice the lesson on seatposts, handlebars, crank arms, etc.

come back @KHAtful
Who me?! Or that other KHatfull who mysteriously disappeared?

I've got a new project (1974 Crescent Pepita Professional DeLuxe) and I thought of my thread here as I violated a prime directive:

Is the part anodized or not?

Yep, went to muck with a set of handlebars, started in with the scuff ball in the drill press, and quickly found out that I wore through anodizing and had to strip and polish the whole blessed thing. Nothing like an 11:00p trip to the grocery store for one can of Easy-Off!

ALWAYS check for anodizing

You might see me post a little more often going forward.
khatfull is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-07-17, 03:17 PM   #119
Roll-Monroe-Co
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Bikes:
Posts: 2,255
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 38 Post(s)
Shiver me timbers.
Roll-Monroe-Co is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-07-17, 03:37 PM   #120
khatfull
FBoD Member at Large
Thread Starter
 
khatfull's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Woodbury, MN
Bikes:
Posts: 6,246
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 27 Post(s)
And, just an update:

I still do all the things I posted from the very beginning, with one minor exception...

I've always had a drill press in the house. I worked by hand mostly because I enjoyed it and it was fun using nothing but sandpaper, steel wool, rags, and Mothers to bring out the shining gems in these otherwise dull parts.

Now, almost seven years older than when I first posted this, eh, a little laziness has crept in I do now use the drill press for most polishing tasks...several different sizes and shapes of cloth wheels (round, mushroom, conical, etc.) and Mothers but honestly, I let the motor do most of the work now.

As long as you have the room you can go to Harbor Freight and get a tabletop press that will do 99% of what you'd ever need with a bike part for $70. I just looked at my CL, saw them as cheap as $50. YOu can sometime find a floorstander for $100 on CL if someone's trying to move one. I have a tabletop I've had for 30ish years.

While it somewhat violates the spirit of the post I made initially some technology isn't a bad thing. I just cleaned and polished a pair of AVA tubular rims in two evenings. Took a whole evening to clean off all the old glue and another evening to polish. Had I not used the drill press on the polish part I'd still be there. I always do a final polish by hand with a nice soft cloth and a little Mothers but the bulk of the work can be done with the press.

So if you don't have room, live in an apartment, etc. all the "by hand" techniques will work just fine. If you have the means, by all means, look at a cheap or used drill press if you polish parts with any regularity.

Rims below. Still a few flaws but how aggressive do you want to be on rims? (43 years of old, hard, fossilized glue...ugh.)

Before.jpg

After1.jpg

After2.jpg
khatfull is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-07-17, 04:03 PM   #121
Wildwood
Senior Member
 
Wildwood's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Seattle area
Bikes: Bikes??? Thought this was social media?!?
Posts: 6,034
Mentioned: 80 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 805 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by khatfull View Post
And, just an update:

I still do all the things I posted from the very beginning, with one minor exception...

Now, almost seven years older than when I first posted this, eh, a little laziness has crept in I do now use the drill press for most polishing tasks...several different sizes and shapes of cloth wheels (round, mushroom, conical, etc.) and Mothers but honestly, I let the motor do most of the work now.

As long as you have the room you can go to Harbor Freight and get a tabletop press that will do 99% of what you'd ever need with a bike part for $70.
Not just back, but with new tips.
Wildwood is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-07-17, 04:35 PM   #122
khatfull
FBoD Member at Large
Thread Starter
 
khatfull's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Woodbury, MN
Bikes:
Posts: 6,246
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 27 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wildwood View Post
Not just back, but with new tips.
Hah, the drill press has always been an option but as I sat and looked at those rims last night I thought to myself...

NAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAHHHHHHHHHHHH!

khatfull is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-07-17, 08:16 PM   #123
Bianchigirll 
Bianchi Goddess
 
Bianchigirll's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Camp Hill, PA
Bikes: Too many to list here check my signature.
Posts: 23,898
Mentioned: 45 Post(s)
Tagged: 2 Thread(s)
Quoted: 537 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by khatfull View Post
Who me?! Or that other KHatfull who mysteriously disappeared?

I've got a new project (1974 Crescent Pepita Professional DeLuxe) and I thought of my thread here as I violated a prime directive:

Is the part anodized or not?

Yep, went to muck with a set of handlebars, started in with the scuff ball in the drill press, and quickly found out that I wore through anodizing and had to strip and polish the whole blessed thing. Nothing like an 11:00p trip to the grocery store for one can of Easy-Off!

ALWAYS check for anodizing

You might see me post a little more often going forward.
Welcome back!!
__________________
Bianchis '87 Sport SX, '90 Proto, '90 Campione del Fausto Giamondi Specialisma Italiano Mundo, '91 Boarala 'cross, '93 Project 3, '86 Volpe, '97 Ti Megatube, , '90 something Vento 603,

Others but still loved,; '80 RIGI, '80 Batavus Professional, '87 Cornelo, '09 Motobecane SOLD, '?? Jane Doe (still on the drawing board), '90ish Haro Escape
Bianchigirll is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 01:28 AM.


 
  • Ask a Question
    get answers from real people!
Click to start entering your question.
I HAVE A QUESTION