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Classic Touring Bike

Old 12-26-10, 06:49 AM
  #1  
tarmenel
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Classic Touring Bike

Looking for Idea's of Touring bikes to look into. Really would like to start touring and would like some input of firstly what bikes to look into, classic steel of course and then what should I be looking for in a touring bike.
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Old 12-26-10, 06:58 AM
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Take a look at John Schubert's articles on touring bikes, and what to look for in one. Here is the link to the Adventure Cycling Association's website that features his articles. Look around the rest of the "how-to" section of the website for information. These are bicycle touring gurus.

https://www.adventurecycling.org/feat...uyersguide.cfm

In a nutshell...the more spokes the better, the more braze-ons for attaching things the better, wider tires are better (forget "skinny" racing tires), long chain stays to allow your heels to clear the rear panniers are good....
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Old 12-26-10, 07:13 AM
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2011 Touring Bike List with prices:

https://www.wasitabatisaw.com/touring-bicycles-2010

Touring Bike List:

https://www.examiner.com/bicycle-trav...uring-bicycles

Touring Bicycles (the C&V ones)

Bridgestone RB-T
Bridgestone T-500
Bridgestone T-700
Centurion Pro Tour
Fuji Touring Series IV
Fuji Touring Series V
Kuwahara Caravan
Lotus Odyssey
Miyata 610
Miyata 1000
Nishiki Continental
Nishiki Cresta GT
Nishiki International
Nishiki Riviera GT
Nishiki Seral
Novara Randonee
Panasonic PT-3500
Panasonic PT-5000
Raleigh Alyeska
Raleigh Kodiak
Raleigh Portage
Raleigh Super Tourer
Raleigh Touring 18
Schwinn Le Tour Luxe (1985)
Schwinn Paramount P15-9 Tourer
Schwinn Passage
Schwinn Voyageur/Voyageur SP
Specialized Expedition
Takara Overland
Trek 520
Trek 620
Trek 720
Univega Gran Tourismo
Univega Specialisima
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Old 12-26-10, 07:22 AM
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Cycleheimer thank you for the link, very informative.
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Old 12-26-10, 07:25 AM
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Reply to OP, you may want to consider a Cannondale Touring model, startes with a "T" e.g. T1200. The touring models use a steel fork which minimizes the vibrations, while the main triangle is the large diameter Al tubes. Just a thought.
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Old 12-26-10, 07:32 AM
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To this (overly-Asian) list should be added some more: Raleigh International, Mercian, Bob Jackson, Woodrup, Jack Taylor, Peugeot UO-8. The Peug might stick out like a sore thumb (most examples will) but for what they are they are pretty light, and have the roominess to accommodate what you'll need to carry. Plus they can accept modern drivetrains if you're creative about it.

Might even want to include the Schwinn Superior and the Super Sport?
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Old 12-26-10, 07:32 AM
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Add Lotus Eclaire to the list.
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Old 12-26-10, 07:38 AM
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Originally Posted by Road Fan View Post
Plus they can accept modern drivetrains if you're creative about it.
This would spark up another fork to this debate but what are the limitations of putting on new component's on these older frames?
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Old 12-26-10, 08:03 AM
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If you have the rear-ends cold-set to 130 mm, they can accept modern 10 or 11-speed road wheels. French frames have different bottom bracket threading from more-common modern British and Italian-threaded BBs. There are only a few options for modernizing the crankset in a vintage French frames: a V-O French bottom bracket, a PhilWoods?, a threadless replacement BB (look on Niagara), or a late-model spindle BB running in the original French BB cups. Some other creative solutions may exist, or vintage parts may cross your path, like a set of French-threaded cups for a vintage Campy Record BB.

In caliper brakes the biggest limitations are reach and the mounting bolt style, recessed versus nutted.

French frames often need unique seatposts - save your old ones, even if they are steel. French forks often require a 22.0 mm quill diameter rather than the much more common 22.2 mm used everywhere else. New stems can be sanded down, but basically, just don't trash the old ones, and watch them for the beginnings of cracks. Good quality French stems can often be found on Ebay, but not in the $5.00 range.

Rear derailleurs often need some kind of claw hangar. Some of them are specific to the brand of derailleur, or there can be incompatibilities.

Dropouts are thinner on older Peugs, being stamped. This means wheel axles, if you're using quick release, can have stubs that are too long to enable a modern QR to seat with proper pressure. This can be real important if the frame is not aligned well enough to properly position the wheel.

Hopefully I've hit all the biggest points, and forestalled a significant thread forking (bent forks can be straightened, btw!).
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Old 12-26-10, 08:29 AM
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I have a question or ten (like always). what kind of touring? "loaded" with camping gear and few days worth of food and clothing? or "credit card" touring with 1 or 2 days clothing and sleepig in motels and buying food along the way?

I used to ride with a group that all had real nice Fuji tourers, you know the Americas, touring series, and Saratogas. the heaviest thing anyone ever carried was a video camera.

so if you not going to burden the bike with alot of weight your options are slightly larger for a type of bike.

for credit card or weekend touring I would even consider something like the early 'sport touring' road triples and maybe even a older steel Volpe.

however I do sometimes find myself lusting over a nice Fuji tourer.
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Old 12-26-10, 08:37 AM
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We have some nice hills here in Wisconsin and on a loaded bike I have always preferred cantilever brakes. I see my bike is on cycleheimers list and you could do a lot worse then the Nishiki Cresta GT. The price on the Nishiki will not brake (<---pun) the bank.
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Old 12-26-10, 08:44 AM
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What kind of touring do you see yourself doing? That effects the model.
Credit card touring aka light touring where you are hotelling it requires a lot less of a bike then full on unsupported touring where you are lugging your shelter, cooking gear and food. Trek 420 and 520 are shorter chain stays and "light touring bikes" where as the 620 and 720 have longer chain stays and more of the heavy loaded touring bikes.

I'm pretty fond of my Fuji on the vintage side. They were built to handle the riggers of the road. 40 spoke rear wheels were standard on the T IV and t V. My T III was built for Lurch came with a 48 spoke back wheel on a Tandum hub.

Cannondales first bike was a Touring bike in the mid 80's. Cannondales roots is in touring bags and dates back to the 70's. I'd still say you would want a 90's Cannondale more then the 80's.

One of the best regarded 80's touring bikes are the Miyata 1000 and its little brother the six ten. The Bridgstones (designed by Grant Peterson who is now Rivendel Bike) were pretty nice as well.

Look around there is a couple Touring bike threads on here including one titled something like "Show us your vintage touring bike" that has 100's of photos to look at.
Edit:
Link to the vintage thread.
https://www.bikeforums.net/showthread...-Touring-bikes
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Old 12-26-10, 10:01 AM
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For what it's worth, I recently acquired a 1988 Voyageur for loaded touring. It's a solid ride and handles the test loads well. My only real complaint relates to my being a tall rider (6' 2") and I'm not thrilled with the length of the top tube. I've got a 100mm stem and I'm going to need to look at a 120 (or possibly even 130mm) stem to get my body geometry oriented more to my personal level of riding comfort. I prefer a flatter, more spread out riding position ... which is not necessarily the ideal touring position by the way. I do like that the Voyageur can handle the lowrider front racks and feels pretty stable under load. All that said, I'm not certain the touring rig will best meet my own needs: I am probably better suited to a randonneur-style bike (long, continuous, unsupported riding vs. day-after-day, stop-to-camp-and-sleep riding) and may ultimately wind up with a bike whose geometry supports riding with a front handlebar bag rather than loaded down with tent and sleeping bag.
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Old 12-26-10, 10:09 AM
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Motobecane Mirage!
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Old 12-26-10, 10:15 AM
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Originally Posted by Road Fan View Post
To this (overly-Asian) list should be added some more: Raleigh International, Mercian, Bob Jackson, Woodrup, Jack Taylor, Peugeot UO-8. The Peug might stick out like a sore thumb (most examples will) but for what they are they are pretty light, and have the roominess to accommodate what you'll need to carry. Plus they can accept modern drivetrains if you're creative about it.

Might even want to include the Schwinn Superior and the Super Sport?
The Raleigh International is NOT a touring bike you should consider. It's more of a sport touring bike/all day rider, doesn't have the braze ones, has 531DB tubing not designed for full touring and would require extenesive upgrades, like a triple crank, to be used for touring. The Pug also isn't ideally suited for touring. The Bob Jacksons and Jack Taylors are going to cost double what a good Japanese tourer will cost (or more) and not really provide much substantive advantage.
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Old 12-26-10, 10:19 AM
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Originally Posted by john hawrylak View Post
Reply to OP, you may want to consider a Cannondale Touring model, startes with a "T" e.g. T1200. The touring models use a steel fork which minimizes the vibrations, while the main triangle is the large diameter Al tubes. Just a thought.
A thought that I second.
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Old 12-26-10, 10:31 AM
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Dawes Galaxy and Dawes Super Galaxy.

IMHO you can tour on anything, you just have to decide what is suitable for you.

Here are three of my "tour" bikes.

Aaron



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Old 12-26-10, 10:35 AM
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@Bianchigirll and Grim - agreed. I bought a fully loaded touring bike (Schwinn Voyageur) which I am happy with...but will probably not use for fully loaded touring anytime soon. A sportier touring bike would probably be a little more fun and responsive to ride if you don't need to lug a hundred pounds around on it.

Originally Posted by KonAaron Snake View Post
The Raleigh International is NOT a touring bike you should consider. It's more of a sport touring bike/all day rider, doesn't have the braze ones, has 531DB tubing not designed for full touring and would require extenesive upgrades, like a triple crank, to be used for touring. The Pug also isn't ideally suited for touring. The Bob Jacksons and Jack Taylors are going to cost double what a good Japanese tourer will cost (or more) and not really provide much substantive advantage.
Agreed. I'm all for vintage European class, but for the price-to-quality ratio, I'll take standardized Japanese steel anyday.

Another few to add - I believe on C&V member has a Shogun tourer with centerpulls, and I'd also like to add this to the list Maruishi (now Jamis) https://www.johnpiazza.net/maruishi.htm. Solid rides made with Ishiwata 022 or EXO mostly. The Wanderer (https://www.johnpiazza.net/mybike.htm) is a good tourer example. I believe (but am not sure) that a lot of lesser-known Japanese brands (Suteki, Takara, etc) made solid tourers back in the day as well.

For a set of good rules for touring bikes, go for lots of braze-ons, clearances, long wheelbase (so panniers don't bump your feet), strong tubing (that handles well under load), canti brakes (stronger braking, gives big clearances), and relaxed geometry.

For simple rules, if you can find canti brakes or lots of braze-ons on a 27" or 700c vintage bike, it'll probably have most of the other qualities of a good tourer.
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Old 12-26-10, 10:41 AM
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Originally Posted by dashuaigeh View Post
@Bianchigirll and Grim - agreed. I bought a fully loaded touring bike (Schwinn Voyageur) which I am happy with...but will probably not use for fully loaded touring anytime soon. A sportier touring bike would probably be a little more fun and responsive to ride if you don't need to lug a hundred pounds around on it.



Agreed. I'm all for vintage European class, but for the price-to-quality ratio, I'll take standardized Japanese steel anyday.

Another few to add - I believe on C&V member has a Shogun tourer with centerpulls, and I'd also like to add this to the list Maruishi (now Jamis) https://www.johnpiazza.net/maruishi.htm. Solid rides made with Ishiwata 022 or EXO mostly. The Wanderer (https://www.johnpiazza.net/mybike.htm) is a good tourer example. I believe (but am not sure) that a lot of lesser-known Japanese brands (Suteki, Takara, etc) made solid tourers back in the day as well.

For a set of good rules for touring bikes, go for lots of braze-ons, clearances, long wheelbase (so panniers don't bump your feet), strong tubing (that handles well under load), canti brakes (stronger braking, gives big clearances), and relaxed geometry.

For simple rules, if you can find canti brakes or lots of braze-ons on a 27" or 700c vintage bike, it'll probably have most of the other qualities of a good tourer.
I could see modifying a Supercourse for the job.
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Old 12-26-10, 10:48 AM
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This thread should be a sticky, over at the Touring Forum.
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Old 12-26-10, 11:36 AM
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Originally Posted by Barrettscv View Post
This thread should be a sticky, over at the Touring Forum.
Uhhh well he is looking for a bike that is more then 6 months old, is not titanium or has any titanium, custom one off build on it and doesn't say Surely or Novara on it anywhere.

This thread is a better fit here with people that appreciate older bikes. The Touring forum seems to be "latest and greatest" driven.

Dont get me wrong, that forum is a wealth of information and I do go read a lot of threads. It lacks the appreciation of C&V bikes.
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Old 12-26-10, 11:43 AM
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Originally Posted by Grim View Post

Dont get me wrong, that forum is a wealth of information and I do go read a lot of threads. It lacks the appreciation of C&V bikes.
You miss the point. Spreading the wealth of information from this forum (where the information is held) to the touring forum (where the information may be applied) would improve the value and utility of the thread.
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Old 12-26-10, 12:34 PM
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Originally Posted by dashuaigeh View Post
For a set of good rules for touring bikes, go for lots of braze-ons, clearances, long wheelbase (so panniers don't bump your feet), strong tubing (that handles well under load), canti brakes (stronger braking, gives big clearances), and relaxed geometry.

For simple rules, if you can find canti brakes or lots of braze-ons on a 27" or 700c vintage bike, it'll probably have most of the other qualities of a good tourer.
My Univega Viva Touring frame has most of the above attributes. The chainstays could stand to be a little longer.
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Old 12-26-10, 12:45 PM
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Originally Posted by cycleheimer View Post
2011 Touring Bike List with prices:

https://www.wasitabatisaw.com/touring-bicycles-2010

Touring Bike List:

https://www.examiner.com/bicycle-trav...uring-bicycles

Touring Bicycles (the C&V ones)

Bridgestone RB-T
Bridgestone T-500
Bridgestone T-700
Centurion Pro Tour
Fuji Touring Series IV
Fuji Touring Series V
Kuwahara Caravan
Lotus Odyssey
Miyata 610
Miyata 1000
Nishiki Continental
Nishiki Cresta GT
Nishiki International
Nishiki Riviera GT
Nishiki Seral
Novara Randonee
Panasonic PT-3500
Panasonic PT-5000
Raleigh Alyeska
Raleigh Kodiak
Raleigh Portage
Raleigh Super Tourer
Raleigh Touring 18
Schwinn Le Tour Luxe (1985)
Schwinn Paramount P15-9 Tourer
Schwinn Passage
Schwinn Voyageur/Voyageur SP
Specialized Expedition
Takara Overland
Trek 520
Trek 620
Trek 720
Univega Gran Tourismo
Univega Specialisima
Here is my example of the bike in bold underline. A good choice IMO, as it is a good value and has most features of what any touring bike has. Also, is built Columbus Tenax tubes.


Last edited by Roger M; 12-26-10 at 01:02 PM.
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Old 12-26-10, 12:55 PM
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Another thumbs-up for Shogun. I have a 1983 1500 and briefly owned a beautiful 1989 Alpine GT which killed me to sell, but it was a tad small for me. The 1500 is like a Cadillac going down the road. Being early-80s it is a little short on braze-ons (only 2 bottle locations and no low-rider on the fork) but that is why they make P-clips. Came with Shimano Deer-Head, cartridge-bearing hubs and 40-spoke rear wheel. It's off the radar so it didn't command the price of a Miyata.
Late 80s steel Japanese tourers are classically styled, designed to function for the purpose and dead reliable.
Also second the Trek 520/620/720... never a bad choice.

Last edited by BluesDaddy; 12-26-10 at 01:01 PM.
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